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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2000
The dedication of Baltimore's new Friendship International Airport on June 24, 1950, coincided with Baltimore Mayor Thomas D'Alesandro Jr.'s first airplane ride. Scheduled to fly to Baltimore from Washington, D.C. with President Harry S. Truman and his official party, the mayor made no attempt to hide his nervousness about being airborne. A week earlier, D'Alesandro told reporters that flying was "strictly for the birds" and he was making the flight only because the president had asked him to. With temperatures soaring into the high 80s by mid-morning, the expected crowd for the dedication of 150,000 was whittled down to some 10,000 because of heat and fears of massive traffic tie-ups.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2014
With beach balls, snorkels and other vacation-themed decorations festooning a section of BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport, six top Southwest Airlines executives will split off in pairs to a steel drum beat and board three flights to the Caribbean. The elaborate sendoff, planned for Tuesday morning, will mark the official entry of the largest domestic carrier in the United States into the international market. BWI officials also hope it signals the start of the growing Anne Arundel County airport's ascendance as a major hub for domestic travelers looking to hop abroad.
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NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2001
ATLANTA - On Delta Flight 731 to Atlanta - the first passenger plane out of Baltimore-Washington International Airport since Tuesday's terrorist attacks - pilots and flight attendants carefully avoided mentioning what was on everyone's mind. But the rows of empty blue seats said it all. This flight, according to Delta, had been overbooked with reservations from people marooned in Maryland since the Federal Aviation Administration shut down the nation's airports Tuesday. Yet when the Boeing 757 took off at 4:22 p.m., only 35 people were on board a plane that seats 186. And their mood was somber.
TRAVEL
By Roberta Sandler, For The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
On Saturday, March 7, 1914, George Herman Ruth planted his feet in the batter's box of the baseball diamond at the Cape Fear Fair Grounds in Fayetteville, N.C., and slammed a pitch. The confident rookie, who had just signed with the Baltimore Orioles, sent the ball soaring 350 feet, hitting his first home run as a professional baseball player. Fayetteville has never let go of that historic moment. Babe Ruth is still reverently referred to, his name inserted into local newspaper articles and spotlighted at a couple of local museums.
BUSINESS
By Julie Johnsson | October 26, 2007
SYDNEY, Australia -- They started lining up at 4:15 a.m. at deserted Singapore Changi Airport, 45 minutes before the ticket counters opened and four hours before the hulking jet would glide into the morning sky. They came from all around the world, all walks of life, drawn by the chance to be the first paying passengers to fly on the first all-new jumbo jet to be developed in decades - and maybe the last. They splurged, from Julian Hayward, who ponied up $100,380 to win the first suite auctioned on the flight, to Artemis Shamari, who paid nearly $4,000 to claim a seat made available by a late cancellation.
FEATURES
By Courtesy Barnes & Noble, children's division, Annapolis Harbour Center | May 13, 1998
Is there an airplane trip in your summer plans? If so, check out these books:* "Big Bird Flies Alone," a Sesame Street book* "Going on an Airplane," by Mr. Rogers* "First Flight," by David McPhail* "Flight," by Robert Burleigh* "Little Red Plane," by Ken Wilson-MaxPub Date: 5/13/98
SPORTS
By SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 17, 2001
Bob Lentz, backed by a four-stroke cushion, birdied the first hole and went on to a relaxed five-shot victory in the annual Fall Publinx Championship at Forest Park Golf Course yesterday. Lentz, the 1998 champion, finished with a 1-over-par 72 and a 36-hole total of 139. In a playoff for second place, Towson University freshman Chris Baloga hit a sand wedge shot to 18 inches and the ensuing birdie at the first extra hole to thwart defending champion Charlie Narciso. Each shot 71. "I knew I could not get off to a bad start," Lentz, 36, said.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 12, 2001
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Up close, the space shuttle Columbia's body shows every one of its 20 years and nearly 111 million miles of flying: pockmarked tiles, rust-colored blemishes and other stains that look like liver spots. But inside, Columbia flaunts its renewed youth. Gone are its old-fashioned gauges and dials, replaced by a control panel that uses full-color computer graphics to show what's going on. The shuttle has shed a few hundred pounds. Most of its wiring is new. The engines are the world's most advanced.
NEWS
By Bill Sizemore and Catherine Kozak and Bill Sizemore and Catherine Kozak,THE VIRGINIAN-PILOT | October 13, 2002
North Carolina wanted to celebrate being "First in Flight" in grand style. And not with just a single day of hoopla, but with a year's worth of parades, flyovers and tributes. The main attraction would be an elaborate aeronautics gala on the Outer Banks, where Wilbur and Orville Wright first defied gravity on Dec. 17, 1903. An aerial program would feature historic aircraft from around the world. An aircraft carrier would be stationed offshore. With the right marketing, talk was, perhaps as many as 1 million people would make pilgrimages to see where the world's first powered flight took place.
BUSINESS
By McClatchy-Tribune | October 11, 2007
TACOMA, Wash. -- Boeing announced yesterday what outside experts have been saying for weeks: The company's 787 Dreamliner is encountering so many problems that deliveries will be delayed. The company said the first commercially operational Dreamliner will be delivered to All Nippon Airways in November or December next year instead of May. "We are disappointed over the schedule changes that we are announcing today," said Boeing chief executive W. James McNerney Jr. "Notwithstanding the challenges that we are experiencing in bringing forward this game-changing product, we remain confident in the design of the 787 and in the fundamental innovation and technologies that underpin it."
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
Southwest Airlines will make its first international flights July 1, including flights between Baltimore and Aruba, the Bahamas and Jamaica, as the carrier takes over routes flown by subsidiary AirTran Airways. Daily flights will operate between Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport and Aruba and Nassau, Bahamas. The airline will operate twice-daily flights between BWI and Montego Bay, Jamaica. AirTran currently flies on those routes. Flights to those Caribbean locations also will be scheduled from Atlanta and Orlando, Fla. "We are in the process of converting existing AirTran destinations with Southwest products," said Dan Landson, a Southwest spokesman.
FEATURES
By Kristine Henry, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2013
A prominent Idaho businessman has lost his job after allegedly slapping a toddler on a plane when the child wouldn't stop crying. While many parents and fliers can agree that "Toddlers on a Plane" would be a terrifying premise for a film, most of us can figure out that hitting a stranger's child is not OK. But what steps can parents take to lessen their children's impact on other passengers? Some people swear by slipping kids a little Benadryl , but I've never gone this route.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2012
Just days after Baltimore Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport learned it would lose three daily Southwest flights early next year, it rolled out the welcome mat for three new daily flights by Spirit Airlines. The first flight arrived Thursday morning at Concourse C, making the low-cost carrier the ninth domestic airline at BWI. The Florida-based airline is offering twice-daily round-trip service to Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas, and a single daily flight to Fort Lauderdale, Fla. "We have the legacy carriers - United, Delta, American - and we have the low-cost carriers that now includes Spirit.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | November 15, 2009
A melia Earhart's name is back in the news these days with the recent release of the Hollywood biopic "Amelia," starring Hilary Swank as the ill-fated flier, and Richard Gere as George Putnam, her husband, publisher and public relations executive. Critics have not exactly given soaring reviews to this film treatment of the pioneering aviator's life and accomplishments. "The filmmakers spend so much time turning her into a dopey romantic figure that they never give her the animating, vital will or even much of a personality that might explain how a Kansas tomboy turned Boston social worker took to the skies and then, through her deeds and words, encouraged other women to chart their own courses," Manohla Dargis wrote last month in The New York Times.
BUSINESS
By Julie Johnsson | October 26, 2007
SYDNEY, Australia -- They started lining up at 4:15 a.m. at deserted Singapore Changi Airport, 45 minutes before the ticket counters opened and four hours before the hulking jet would glide into the morning sky. They came from all around the world, all walks of life, drawn by the chance to be the first paying passengers to fly on the first all-new jumbo jet to be developed in decades - and maybe the last. They splurged, from Julian Hayward, who ponied up $100,380 to win the first suite auctioned on the flight, to Artemis Shamari, who paid nearly $4,000 to claim a seat made available by a late cancellation.
BUSINESS
By McClatchy-Tribune | October 11, 2007
TACOMA, Wash. -- Boeing announced yesterday what outside experts have been saying for weeks: The company's 787 Dreamliner is encountering so many problems that deliveries will be delayed. The company said the first commercially operational Dreamliner will be delivered to All Nippon Airways in November or December next year instead of May. "We are disappointed over the schedule changes that we are announcing today," said Boeing chief executive W. James McNerney Jr. "Notwithstanding the challenges that we are experiencing in bringing forward this game-changing product, we remain confident in the design of the 787 and in the fundamental innovation and technologies that underpin it."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 16, 2006
FORT WORTH, Texas --Lockheed Martin Corp.'s F-35 Lightning II jet fighter, the largest U.S. weapons program ever, successfully completed its first test flight yesterday, which may help pave the way for foreign sales of the aircraft. After a five-year development effort, Lockheed chief pilot Jon S. Beesley took the F-35 on a maiden flight that lasted 35 minutes, said Thomas Jurkowsky, a Lockheed spokesman. The plane was once known as the Joint Strike Fighter to reflect its many international partners.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2000
The battle between America's top corporate defense giants over a $200 billion-plus jet fighter contract officially evolved into an air war yesterday, as Lockheed Martin Corp. flew its proposed Joint Strike Fighter for the first time. Lockheed Martin's X-35 test aircraft flew a brief, subsonic flight from the company facility in Palmdale, Calif., to nearby Edwards Air Force Base, marking the design competition's transition from a battle of concepts into a contest between real, flying aircraft.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 6, 2007
Boeing said yesterday that it would delay the first test flight of the 787 Dreamliner by about three months, the first significant setback to the development of the fastest-selling commercial aircraft in history. The company said that it did not expect the delay to postpone delivery of the first plane to All Nippon Airways of Japan in May. But it will be a significant compression of the program for testing and safety certification, Boeing said. "This adds pressure and some increased risk," Mike Bair, general manager of the 787 program, acknowledged during a conference call from Seattle.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,Sun reporter | May 22, 2007
NEWARK, Del. -- Delaware senior faceoff specialist Alex Smith was sorting through his euphoric thoughts Sunday night, hours after the Blue Hens eliminated UMBC to keep this crazy journey going. It still didn't seem real to the Boys' Latin graduate or his teammates. Delaware, which six weeks earlier was in the throes of a losing streak and on postseason life-support, suddenly had turned the Division I men's lacrosse world on its ear. Next stop, an unprecedented trip to the NCAA final four at M&T Bank Stadium, where about 60,000 fans are expected Saturday to watch the Blue Hens try to do the unthinkable again, this time against Johns Hopkins.
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