Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFirst Edition
IN THE NEWS

First Edition

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2012
Joseph McGraw had doubts when his friend told him about a first edition of the King James Bible that was sitting in a downtown Baltimore office. But when the hulking book came off the shelf, the Stevenson University history professor thought, "Wow, that looks pretty old. " Then he opened it and saw the printer's official dedication to the king. "Wow," he said to his friend, "we need to talk. " Almost a year after that conversation, the rare King James edition — there are about 175 in the world — resides in the library at Stevenson, part of a collection of 300 Bibles and related documents from the nonprofit Maryland Bible Society.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2013
In 1926, H.W. Fowler offered a suggestion about making the English language a little tidier. In examining the various and inconsistent manifestations of the relative pronouns that , which , and who , he wrote that "perhaps the line of improvement lies in clearer differentiation between that & which . "  That suggestion, in the first edition of Modern English Usage , has ossified into a Rule among American editors....
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES | March 17, 1996
I've started collecting Little Golden Books that I read as a child. Many of them seem too new to be original. Is there some way I can tell if they are old?The Western Publishing Co. has sold billions of Little Golden Books since it published the first dozen titles in 1942.Some titles were published for many years. The most valuable is a first edition. Check the book's first two pages. There should be a string of letters. The letter on the far left shows the edition the book. An "A" on the far left indicates a first edition; a "B", a second edition; and so on.The letters sometimes appear on the last page.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2012
Joseph McGraw had doubts when his friend told him about a first edition of the King James Bible that was sitting in a downtown Baltimore office. But when the hulking book came off the shelf, the Stevenson University history professor thought, "Wow, that looks pretty old. " Then he opened it and saw the printer's official dedication to the king. "Wow," he said to his friend, "we need to talk. " Almost a year after that conversation, the rare King James edition — there are about 175 in the world — resides in the library at Stevenson, part of a collection of 300 Bibles and related documents from the nonprofit Maryland Bible Society.
NEWS
April 20, 1997
Jean Peters Pilch: A photograph that appeared with the obituary of Jean Peters Pilch in the first edition of The Sun today was incorrect.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 4/20/97
NEWS
December 25, 1999
Because U.S. financial markets were closed yesterday for the holiday, no Business section appears in today's editions. The weekly mutual fund listings will be published, as usual, in tomorrow's Business section.Also, The Sun will not publish its Sunday first edition normally available on Saturdays.
NEWS
November 18, 1990
UNION BRIDGE - Delores Bloom, an Elmer Wolfe Elementary second-grade teacher, has been included in the first edition of "Who's Who Among American Teachers." Educators were nominated by former students who were in "Who's Who Among American High School Students" or on the National Dean's List.
BUSINESS
By Copley News Service | June 20, 1993
Fans of mystery writer Sue Grafton are snapping up the latest of her alphabet mysteries, " 'J' is for Judgment."But for another group of book lovers, the Grafton title to have is her first, " 'A' is for Alibi," and they're willing to pay up to $1,000 for a 1982 first edition in mint condition.A thousand dollars? For a Sue Grafton mystery?Hard to believe? How about $600 for Anne Rice's "Interview with the Vampire"? Or $700 for Tom Clancy's "The Hunt for Red October"?Instead of crumbling manuscripts or leather-bound classics, books published in the last two decades or even the last two months -- so-called hypermoderns -- are the choice of a new generation of collectors.
NEWS
September 14, 1995
Tomorrow the last issue of The Evening Sun will be published. It will be a special souvenir edition with articles, photographs and columns on the paper's 85-year history.On Monday, Sept. 18, subscribers will receive the first edition of the redesigned, expanded morning newspaper, which will combine the best and most popular features of The Sun and The Evening Sun. Included in the Monday paper will be an eight-page special section to explain the new look and the added features.If you have any questions, please call us at 539-1280 or (800)
NEWS
September 23, 2010
Everyone has "secrets" that they don't want to see in print. The Defense Department has a lot of them. One of them is that the nickname for Fort Meade is "The Fort. " Another is that IRGC is the abbreviation for the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps. And a third sizzler is that Camp Peary, Va. is the home of a Central Intelligence Agency training ground. It is also known as "The Farm," not to be confused with "The Fort. " Keep that under your hat. These and other bits of "confidential information" that can be unearthed by simple clicks on a computer are found in the first edition of a memoir about the Afghanistan war called "Operation Dark Heart.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2010
Oh Say Can You See …half a million dollars? A rare first edition of the sheet music for "The Star-Spangled Banner" sold for $506,500 at Christie's Auction House in New York Friday, doubling pre-auction estimates of its value and setting a world auction record for sheet music. The two-page piece of sheet music, published by a Baltimore printer in 1814, was sold to a private U.S. collector who wishes to remain anonymous, Christie's spokeswoman Sung-Hee Park said. It is one of only 11 copies of that first printing known to exist, and apparently remains the only one in private hands.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2010
It's the typo that gives it away. The two 13-by-9.5-inch pieces of paper that will go up for auction at Christie's on Friday spell out in big, bold, black letters, "The Star Spangled Banner. " Underneath this heading is written, much smaller, these words of explanation: "A Pariotic Song. " Thomas Carr, a 19th century music publisher who operated a store at 36 Baltimore St., intended to print "A Patriotic Song. " But he was rushing to capitalize on the popularity of the little ditty that Francis Scott Key penned while watching the bombing of Fort McHenry during the War of 1812, and lacked the modern-day luxury of spell-check.
NEWS
September 23, 2010
Everyone has "secrets" that they don't want to see in print. The Defense Department has a lot of them. One of them is that the nickname for Fort Meade is "The Fort. " Another is that IRGC is the abbreviation for the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps. And a third sizzler is that Camp Peary, Va. is the home of a Central Intelligence Agency training ground. It is also known as "The Farm," not to be confused with "The Fort. " Keep that under your hat. These and other bits of "confidential information" that can be unearthed by simple clicks on a computer are found in the first edition of a memoir about the Afghanistan war called "Operation Dark Heart.
NEWS
October 16, 2005
Big fun for disciples in the cult of 'Lebowski' THE BIG LEBOWSKI: COLLECTOR'S EDITION / / Universal / $19.98 THE BIG LEBOWSKI: COLLECTOR'S EDITION ACHIEVER'S EDITION / / Universal / $49.98 Beloved by stoners and stoner wannabes everywhere, 1998's The Big Lebowski stars Jeff Bridges as Jeff Lebowski (aka The Dude), a devoted slacker and profligate bowler who somehow gets embroiled in a film noir-caliber caper involving a rich man, his sexy young wife, a kidnapping, a marmot and a trio of destructive Germans.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | December 28, 2003
The Devil's Dictionary, by Ambrose Bierce. 192 pages. $15.95. Compiling years of lines from columns he wrote for the Hearst newspapers, Bierce -- one of the extraordinary characters of 19th-century American literature -- published the first edition of The Devil's Dictionary in 1906. It covered the letters A through L. By 1911 he completed the alphabet, and subsequent editions have been adored and detested, heaped with praise and damned for cynicism. This newest edition is gloriously illustrated by Ralph Steadman.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | August 23, 2002
Collectors of Edgar Allan Poe and H.L. Mencken are roiling the Baltimore rare-book world during these dog days of August like stockbrokers dealing blue chips in a sell-off. "During the last three weeks almost on a daily basis people have just been lining up with books to sell," says Teresa Johanson, the proprietor with her husband Don of Kelmscott Bookshop on 25th Street. "Monday the phone rang all day. [Last] Friday was so insane I could hardly fill orders." She doesn't think it's the heat.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | July 29, 2001
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: The Only Authoritative Text, by Mark Twain, edited by Victor Fischer and Lin Salamo, with original illustrations by E.W. Kemble and John Harley (The Mark Twain Library, 561 pages, $14.95). Any Mark Twain enthusiast knows that in 1990 significant parts of the original manuscript of Huck Finn -- lost for 100 years --were found in a Los Angeles attic. That material, along with an exhaustive re-examination of other sources and interpretations, has been incorporated into this text.
NEWS
December 25, 1999
Because U.S. financial markets were closed yesterday for the holiday, no Business section appears in today's editions. The weekly mutual fund listings will be published, as usual, in tomorrow's Business section.Also, The Sun will not publish its Sunday first edition normally available on Saturdays.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.