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NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
The two men vying to become Maryland's next governor have agreed to an hourlong televised debate in early October, reaching a deal after more than a month of uncertainty about when — and whether — the pair would face off. Democrat Anthony G. Brown and Republican Larry Hogan said Wednesday they have agreed to an Oct. 7 debate hosted by The Baltimore Sun and WJZ-TV, which will be taped in the morning and aired statewide that night. Behind the scenes, the campaigns are still wrangling over details of a television debate in the Washington region and a radio debate.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
The second televised debate in the race for governor is Monday. Democrat Anthony G. Brown and Republican Larry Hogan have given a number of clues about what to expect. Here are five things to keep in mind while watching: How many times does Hogan pound his bread-and-butter themes about a lackluster economy? Some of Hogan's oft-used phrases about Maryland's financial health include "40 consecutive tax increases," "mass exodus of businesses and families" and "8,000 businesses killed.
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NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2010
In their first debate of the election year Monday, Gov. Martin O'Malley and rival Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. each insisted he has a better plan for jobs, education and spending taxpayer dollars wisely as Maryland emerges from a national recession. Neither O'Malley, the Democratic incumbent, nor Ehrlich, a Republican seeking to reclaim the position he lost four years ago, made a major blunder. But the televised debate was tense at times, in part because of a free-flowing format that allowed the two to respond to each other directly while the moderator sat silently for long stretches.
NEWS
October 8, 2014
Democrat Anthony G. Brown and Republican Larry Hogan threw around a lot of charges and numbers during Tuesday's gubernatorial debate. Here are some of the facts behind the accusations. • Brown repeatedly said Hogan wants to hand corporations "a $300 million tax giveaway. " Hogan has said he wants to reduce Maryland's corporate tax rate from 8.25 to 6 percent, which translates into $300 million of tax revenue in one year. Hogan contends the increased economic activity from lower taxes would eventually more than offset that loss.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2012
So much for the notion of an American public that's supposed to be turned off by presidential politics in 2012. A huge audience of 67.2 million watched Wednesday night's debate between GOP candidate Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama. That is up 28 percent from the first debate in 2008 between Obama and Sen. John McCain. While the big audience seems like good news for democracy, it's not so good for Obama -- who turned in a dismal performance
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 4, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Contrary to all the great expectations, the first debate of the 2000 presidential campaign settled nothing. Neither Al Gore nor George W. Bush managed a memorable coup. And both avoided the kind of gaffe that has done so much to compromise other candidates in other years. Anyone who tries to assess the outcome on the question of who scored the most debating points will find it almost impossible. Both the Democratic vice president and his Republican opponent spent most of their 90 minutes on national television reiterating time and again the same points they have been making in the seven months since they locked up their presidential nominations.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2012
A Pew study on coverage of the presidential race reveals a generally negative press for both candidates -- and a particularly hostile social media. It also catalogs a sharp shift toward more favorable coverage for GOP candidate Mitt Romney after President Obama's poor first debate performance. Obama does, however, get a slight edge in favorable coverage over the length of the study. The first finding might seem like only piling up of data on the obvious, but if you go inside the numbers and think about them, there is much to chew on. I think the resolutely negative tone on Twitter and Facebook especially is a real problem for democracy.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 8, 2004
WASHINGTON - For President Bush, perhaps the best thing he could take from his debate last week with Democratic challenger John Kerry was that there would be two more chances. This evening, when Bush and Kerry meet in St. Louis for their second face-to-face encounter, the president has a chance to wipe away memories of their first meeting in Miami, where he grimaced and scowled repeatedly on national television. With even Bush's boosters giving the president's performance mediocre grades, polls have shown Kerry tightening the race since then.
NEWS
By Abe Novick | October 19, 2000
DID THE TWO candidates have the courage of their convictions? Did they connect on a visceral level with us? Do they have the right stuff? Overall, like characters in an existential drama, both candidates were so self-aware that they became incapacitated. They couldn't engage us. They didn't soar. Both Mr. Gore and Mr. Bush were overly distracted by the minutiae -- not only of policy, but of presentation. Mr. Gore, after the first debate, was told not to sigh. Mr. Bush was warned about his loose, vague, colloquial responses about complex foreign affairs.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Staff Writer | October 16, 1992
Round 2 of the presidential debates was a split decision, but the winner was again the slightly hoarse governor from Arkansas, Bill Clinton, according to a panel of eight Baltimore area voters who have viewed the first two presidential debates together at the invitation of the Baltimore Sun.The panel had judged Mr. Clinton the shutout winner of the first debate -- 6-0, with two voting for a tie -- mostly on the basis of strength on the issues. Last night five members voted him the winner again -- including all three undecided voters on the panel -- while two said President Bush won it and one declared independent candidate Ross Perot the winner.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
The two men vying to become Maryland's next governor have agreed to an hourlong televised debate in early October, reaching a deal after more than a month of uncertainty about when — and whether — the pair would face off. Democrat Anthony G. Brown and Republican Larry Hogan said Wednesday they have agreed to an Oct. 7 debate hosted by The Baltimore Sun and WJZ-TV, which will be taped in the morning and aired statewide that night. Behind the scenes, the campaigns are still wrangling over details of a television debate in the Washington region and a radio debate.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
The two opponents of Del. Jon S. Cardin in his race for the Democratic nomination for attorney general chastised him during a debate Monday night for skipping almost 75 percent of his committee votes this year. State Sen. Brian E. Frosh of Montgomery County and Del. Aisha Braveboy of Prince George's County said there was no excuse for missing so many voting sessions, where decisions are made on which bills die and which advance to a floor vote. "If you don't show up in Annapolis, if you don't vote, you don't count," Frosh said during the first debate of the attorney general's race, held at the University of Maryland.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown and Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler launched barbed attacks on each other's record and character as they and Del. Heather R. Mizeur met in the Democratic gubernatorial campaign's first televised debate Wednesday night. As Brown and Gansler exchanged acrimonious remarks over everything from the rollout of Obamacare to a raucous teen party Gansler failed to break up last year, Mizeur admonished her better-known rivals for "bickering" instead of talking about solution's to Maryland's problems.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
Having an experienced TV moderator went a long way Wednesday night in making Maryland's first debate among the Democratic candidates for governor a lively and occasionally illuminating hour of television. David Gregory is getting hammered these days by the critics and in the ratings for his work on NBC's “Meet the Press,” but he showed more than enough political savvy and TV smarts to keep the Maryland debate on point most of the night. He quickly sharpened the focus and heightened conflict among two of the candidates by using his first question to ask who should be blamed for the disastrous rollout of the Maryland health care exchange.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2014
  Hard on the news that Baltimore viewers are scheduled to be excluded from a TV debate May 7 among Maryland's Democratic candidates, WBFF (Fox45) said Wednesday that it has "been negotiating for months" with  Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler and Del. Heather R. Mizeur for a debate in Baltimore. "We're still confident that details will be worked out," Mike Tomko, news director at the Sinclair-owned Fox affiliate in Baltimore, said Wednesday morning in the wake of dueling press releases among the candidates arguing over a Baltimore-staged debate.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
Even though next week's first gubernatorial debate is being co-hosted by two taxpayer-funded state universities, Baltimore viewers are not scheduled to be able to see it. The event featuring Democratic candidates Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler and Del. Heather R. Mizeur is scheduled for 7 p.m. May 7 at the University of Maryland, College Park and will be broadcast live on Washington's NBC-owned station, WRC-TV (Channel...
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | November 15, 1991
THE NATION'S seven commercial and public television networks, in an unprecedented move that will bring greater attention to Democrats seeking their party's presidential nomination in 1992, have agreed to televise at least seven prime-time debates among the party's candidates.The first debate will be broadcast by NBC in Washington Dec. 15 and others will follow as the nominating process unfolds, it was announced yesterday. CNN has scheduled the second debate for Feb. 16 at St. Anselm's College in Manchester, N.H.In addition to NBC, the debate agreement involves CBS, ABC, CNN, Fox, PBS and C-SPAN.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2014
The first televised debate in Maryland's Democratic primary for governor will be May 7, followed by a second debate on June 2, according to the stations that will broadcast them. The first TV debate matching Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler and Del. Heather R. Mizeur is scheduled for 7 p.m. May 7 at the University of Maryland, College Park and will be broadcast on Washington's NBC affiliate. According to NBC4, "Meet the Press" host David Gregory will moderate.
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