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By JUDY REILLY | December 10, 1992
The cattle are lowing, shepherds are guarding the sheep bearded men with inquisitive eyes come bearing gifts, and somewhere a baby cries.Those are the sights and sounds of the first Christmas, which will be re-created Saturday and Sunday evening at Big Pipe Creek Park in Taneytown."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2012
For Bryan Voltaggio, this holiday season is about beginnings. His latest restaurant venture - and the first outside Frederick - is slated to open. It will be his family's first Christmas in their new Urbana home. And with a son age 5 and a daughter who's not quite 2, that tender age when he's pretty sure Christmas memories start to truly cement, the chef and father is determined to do it right. No surprise, he'll be making most of it happen in the kitchen - Santa's workshop with cinnamon, nutmeg, orange peel and peppermint.
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FEATURES
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1997
He looks at her.She looks at him.They giggle.This is how you act when you have been married six whole weeks, when you are head over heels in love, when you are just days away from celebrating your first Christmas together as husband and wife."
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,Sun reporter | December 22, 2007
Archbishop Edwin F. O'Brien will be spending Christmas a little differently this year. But it's not just that this is his first Noel as archbishop of Baltimore. Every year for the past decade, he's marked the holiday overseas. "This is the first Christmas I've been in the states in 10 years," he said. Formerly the archbishop of military services, O'Brien would travel to celebrate Mass with the troops at different bases on Christmas. Last year he was in Kuwait, and the year before that he went to Bosnia and Kosovo.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,Sun reporter | December 22, 2007
Archbishop Edwin F. O'Brien will be spending Christmas a little differently this year. But it's not just that this is his first Noel as archbishop of Baltimore. Every year for the past decade, he's marked the holiday overseas. "This is the first Christmas I've been in the states in 10 years," he said. Formerly the archbishop of military services, O'Brien would travel to celebrate Mass with the troops at different bases on Christmas. Last year he was in Kuwait, and the year before that he went to Bosnia and Kosovo.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | December 22, 1994
Bishop P. Francis Murphy, auxiliary bishop of Baltimore, will celebrate the 9:30 a.m. Mass Christmas at Springfield Hospital Center in Sykesville.The service, which is open to the public, will be in the auditorium of the Big G building at 6655 Sykesville Road.In his homily, Bishop Murphy will relate the story of the first Christmas to the world today."The Christmas story that challenges me most deeply is the fact of the homelessness of Mary and Joseph," he has written for his sermon. "It is a story being repeated again and again in our own society."
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,SPECIAL TO THE SUN Chris Kaltenbach, Staff writer contributed to this article | November 29, 1996
It's the day after Thanksgiving, and you know what that means in TV terms -- a prime-time sighting of a Christmas special."Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- This is one of the few holiday specials many people eagerly await each year. In this particular case, I don't happen to be among them: The tabletop stop-animation here gave me the creeps as a kid, a feeling I've never completely outgrown. But this 1964 special does have Burl Ives as narrator and a certain retro charm 32 years later.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | December 10, 1998
It may be something of an exaggeration to describe Vince Gill as "a right jolly old elf," but there's no denying that he's a happy fellow.He's supposed to be talking about his Christmas tour (which plays the MCI Center on Sunday) and brand-new holiday album, "Breath of Heaven," but somehow, he can't stop laughing. It isn't that he's being silly or has been sniffing laughing gas; he just happens to be in an incredibly good mood.But who can blame him? He's about to spend the month of December doing Christmas shows.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | December 7, 1994
The odds against it happening are very high, but tonight TV provides a sort of holiday miracle: two watchable Christmas specials on the same night. One is from 1965 -- and that's the newer one. The other, seen for the first time since it was performed live on the DuMont network, is from 1951.* "A Charlie Brown Christmas" (8-8:30 p.m., Channel 11) -- Vince Guaraldi's jazz score is terrific. Linus' lecture about the true meaning of Christmas is right on the money -- and right about the money, too. Then there's the Snoopy dance, seen in animated form for the first time -- and that scrawny Christmas tree, which Charlie Brown identifies with for all the right reasons.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | December 9, 2001
This is the time of year when we think back to the very first Christmas, when the Three Wise Men - Gaspar, Balthasar and Herb - went to see the baby Jesus, and, according to the Book of Matthew, "presented unto Him gifts; gold, frankincense and myrrh." These are simple words, but if we analyze them carefully, we discover an important, yet often-overlooked, theological fact: There is no mention of wrapping paper. If there had been wrapping paper, Matthew would have said so: "And lo, the gifts were inside 600 square cubits of paper.
NEWS
By Pam Lobley | December 25, 2006
In an effort to make nightly dinners with our young sons bearable, my husband and I created a conversation starter: We each go around the table and say a good thing and a bad thing about our day. This helps the kids focus their thoughts and lets us in on any goings-on at school we might not know about. I don't know about your dinner table, but ours borders on a free-for-all. One boy hates all vegetables, and one hates most meats, and they both hate a sauce of any kind. They salt their food until it's white.
NEWS
By Paul Kennedy | December 7, 2003
IT IS DIFFICULT for conservatives in the United States not to concede that things have failed to go according to plan in Iraq, but only a few admit that things are a mess. Meanwhile, among the critics of the Bush administration's "forward school" - ranging from retired army generals to Middle East experts to anti-war radicals - there seems little satisfaction at having been proved correct in their forecasts that it would be harder to get out of Iraq than to kick one's way in. The situation in Iraq - and perhaps increasingly in Afghanistan - is too serious for schadenfreude.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | December 9, 2001
This is the time of year when we think back to the very first Christmas, when the Three Wise Men - Gaspar, Balthasar and Herb - went to see the baby Jesus, and, according to the Book of Matthew, "presented unto Him gifts; gold, frankincense and myrrh." These are simple words, but if we analyze them carefully, we discover an important, yet often-overlooked, theological fact: There is no mention of wrapping paper. If there had been wrapping paper, Matthew would have said so: "And lo, the gifts were inside 600 square cubits of paper.
NEWS
By Peg Adamarczyk and Peg Adamarczyk,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 3, 1999
FOR MANY of us, Christmas just wouldn't be Christmas without a visit to a train garden. One of my fondest childhood holiday memories is visiting a neighbor's small rowhouse to see her dad's train display during the holiday season.And that brings us to Pasadena resident John N. Sturgeon Sr., who has not only a passion for trains but opens his door to the community during the holiday season. Visitors can see the display beginning Thursday evening.I arrived for a preview visit at the Sturgeon home at 836 Turf Valley Drive to be greeted by the flashing red lights of a railroad sign.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | December 10, 1998
It may be something of an exaggeration to describe Vince Gill as "a right jolly old elf," but there's no denying that he's a happy fellow.He's supposed to be talking about his Christmas tour (which plays the MCI Center on Sunday) and brand-new holiday album, "Breath of Heaven," but somehow, he can't stop laughing. It isn't that he's being silly or has been sniffing laughing gas; he just happens to be in an incredibly good mood.But who can blame him? He's about to spend the month of December doing Christmas shows.
FEATURES
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1997
He looks at her.She looks at him.They giggle.This is how you act when you have been married six whole weeks, when you are head over heels in love, when you are just days away from celebrating your first Christmas together as husband and wife."
NEWS
By Peg Adamarczyk and Peg Adamarczyk,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 3, 1999
FOR MANY of us, Christmas just wouldn't be Christmas without a visit to a train garden. One of my fondest childhood holiday memories is visiting a neighbor's small rowhouse to see her dad's train display during the holiday season.And that brings us to Pasadena resident John N. Sturgeon Sr., who has not only a passion for trains but opens his door to the community during the holiday season. Visitors can see the display beginning Thursday evening.I arrived for a preview visit at the Sturgeon home at 836 Turf Valley Drive to be greeted by the flashing red lights of a railroad sign.
NEWS
By Janet P. Zinzeleta | November 12, 1991
THE CRISPNESS in the air, the crunching of leaves underfoot, the early darkening of the sky -- these signs would be enough, even without the store decorations and unsubtle advertisements, to let us know that "the holidays" are approaching. For people who are grieving, especially if this is the first holiday time to be confronted without the presence of a loved one who has died, this is a difficult time of year.Bereavement support groups usually devote at least one session to hints on how to handle holiday depression.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,SPECIAL TO THE SUN Chris Kaltenbach, Staff writer contributed to this article | November 29, 1996
It's the day after Thanksgiving, and you know what that means in TV terms -- a prime-time sighting of a Christmas special."Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- This is one of the few holiday specials many people eagerly await each year. In this particular case, I don't happen to be among them: The tabletop stop-animation here gave me the creeps as a kid, a feeling I've never completely outgrown. But this 1964 special does have Burl Ives as narrator and a certain retro charm 32 years later.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff WriterSun Staff WriterSun Staff WriterSun Staff Writer | December 25, 1994
It's all about family and love and a little girlFor Kevin and Karen Riordan, the arrival of their adopted daughter, Nora Kim Lilly Riordan, has meant a season of joyous firsts."
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