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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
Ronald S. Coddington, an author and editor, has spent nearly four decades collecting Civil War-era images — especially cartes de visite, his favorite. Out of a collection of 2,500 images he has assembled, 1,500 are cartes de visite, with the remainder being daguerreotypes, ambrotypes and tintypes. In 2004, his first collection of images resulted in "Faces of the Civil War: An Album of Union Soldiers and Their Stories" published by the Johns Hopkins University Press. The format he used, in which he was able to research and write a thumbnail biography of each person, was so successful he did a second volume, "Faces of the Confederacy: An Album of Southern Soldiers and Their Stories," published in 2008.
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NEWS
January 20, 2005
Muff Singer, 62, who wrote or co-wrote more than 35 books for toddlers and preschoolers, died of ovarian cancer Sunday at her Los Angeles home. A former political activist and the wife of former City Comptroller Rick Tuttle, Ms. Singer published her first book in 1981 and turned to children's books in the 1980s after the birth of her daughter, Sarah. Many of her board-page books, including What Does Kitty See and Little Duck's Friends, came with a stuffed or squeaking toy of the story's main character.
NEWS
December 28, 2000
An interview with Jane Martello, founder of BLIPS (Book Lovers in Paradise), a mother/daughter book club. What book are members reading this month? "The Secret of Platform 13" by Eva Ibbotson. It's about creatures living under the London subway. Is there a book that members have especially liked? The first book that we did, "The BFG" by Roald Dahl. The giant, the main character in the story, talked in a really funny way, and it really got their attention. How did the mothers like the book?
NEWS
February 17, 2002
Area literacy groups invited to apply for grants BALTIMORE - First Book, a national nonprofit group that provides new books to low-income families, is seeking grant applications from literacy groups in Baltimore and Baltimore County interested in distributing books throughout their communities. Applicants must be tutoring, mentoring or family literacy group programs that work with low-income children in those jurisdictions. Applications are available by contacting Baltimore First Book at ndt5spring@aol.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | March 12, 2012
I face a tough choice this week: Start filling out my NCAA tournament bracket or continue with the Hunger Games trilogy. I finished the first book in Suzanne Collins' series over the weekend, just in time to clear the slate for a week of college hoops. Mid-March is generally the time that my reading goes on hiatus -- back-to-back-to-back-to-back basketball games will do that. And this year there's a special reason to watch: To see if my home-state team, the University of Connecticut Huskies, can defend its national championship.
NEWS
By PETER JENSEN and PETER JENSEN,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1999
When children's writer Mary Koski proudly read her first book to a neighbor's daughter, she wasn't prepared for her reaction."Why," asked the little girl, pointing to the book's heroine, "are her feet so huge?"Koski was surprised that a youngster would focus on such a trivial matter. The book, after all, was about how to dial 911 in an emergency. But when the same question was repeated by children during a subsequent book tour, the reason dawned on her."We live in a culture where kids at a young age are focused on their bodies, particularly differences in our bodies," says Koski, 48, the former head of a Duluth, Minn.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 24, 1999
CLUE BY CLUE, children's writer Ken Munro revealed the secrets of writing mystery books about familiar people and places during a visit Friday at Spring Garden Elementary School in Hampstead.Invited by fourth-grade teacher Erica Steele, he met with the fourth and fifth grades. The large audience was divided into four sessions of about 75 pupils and teachers.Even when speaking for the fourth time, his humor and enthusiasm remained strong. He was obviously delighted to share the author's life with children.
NEWS
December 18, 2001
John Guedel, 88, who produced three of radio and television's most enduring programs - Art Linkletter's People Are Funny and House Party, and Groucho Marx's You Bet Your Life - died of heart failure Saturday at a hospital in West Hollywood, Calif. Mr. Guedel was originator of what might have been the first radio stunt game show with People are Funny, which moved from radio to television in 1954, and the first singing commercial on radio. Mr. Guedel created You Bet Your Life for Mr. Marx in 1947, including having a duck drop down and deliver a $100 bill whenever a contestant uttered the "secret word."
NEWS
By Josh Mitchel | July 31, 2005
Harford County Executive David R. Craig has released his first book, "Greetings from Havre de Grace," which he describes as a pictorial "history of the city through postcards." Craig, who co-wrote the book with local antiques dealer Mary L. Martin, wrote captions for the postcards, which feature Concord Point lighthouse, Tide water Marina and other land marks. "You can you see how the city has changed," Craig said. The 128-page book, published by Schiffer Publishing Ltd., was released this month and sells for $24.95.
FEATURES
By Bill Goodykoontz and Bill Goodykoontz,Arizona Republic | November 10, 1993
There sat Daryl Bernstein after school at a table in a buzzing McDonald's in Scottsdale, Ariz. Fairly normal stuff for a high school senior -- except that, instead of girls or sports, the 17-year-old was discussing publication of his second book.That's often how it is with Daryl: The setting's normal, as if you're talking to an everyday teen-ager, but it doesn't take long to realize you've got a successful author and businessman on your hands as well.The subject at hand is "Kids Can Succeed!
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