Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFirst Book
IN THE NEWS

First Book

FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | March 12, 2012
I face a tough choice this week: Start filling out my NCAA tournament bracket or continue with the Hunger Games trilogy. I finished the first book in Suzanne Collins' series over the weekend, just in time to clear the slate for a week of college hoops. Mid-March is generally the time that my reading goes on hiatus -- back-to-back-to-back-to-back basketball games will do that. And this year there's a special reason to watch: To see if my home-state team, the University of Connecticut Huskies, can defend its national championship.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 1, 2000
Betty Macdonald Batcheller, 92, an original member of Martha Graham's first dance company in the 1920s, died Jan. 15 in Greenwich, Conn. She joined two dancers to perform in Miss Graham's first independent program as a choreographer at the 48th Street Theater in Manhattan in April 1926. Friedrich Gulda, 69, widely considered one of Austria's foremost classical and jazz pianists, died Thursday in Vienna, Austria, of an apparent heart attack. He was praised by music critics for his interpretation of the piano music of Beethoven, Bach and Mozart.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | November 25, 2007
The walls of her Gambrills home are filled with paintings of barns, churches, historic landmarks and old houses from across the state. For more than two decades, Mildred Bottner Anderson visited those sites, sometimes taking photographs that she brought back to her studio and used to paint watercolor renderings. Other times she painted on location. In many cases, the places depicted in her artwork were at risk of being demolished, she said. Anderson said she felt a duty to preserve them in the paintings.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victoria A. Brownworth and By Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | March 10, 2002
Fingersmith, by Sarah Waters. Riverhead Books. 520 pages. 25.95. Some novelists burst onto the literary scene with a brilliant first book and each subsequent book is weaker and more disappointing than the last. Then there are those few whose first book is exciting and fresh and each new work is ever fuller, deeper. English novelist Sarah Waters fits the latter category. Her debut novel, Tipping the Velvet (Riverhead, 1999) was a New York Times Notable Book; her second novel, Affinity (Riverhead)
FEATURES
By Laura Lippmann | November 3, 1999
Nineteen years ago, Sue Grafton published her first "Alphabet" mystery, "A is for Alibi," introducing female private investigator Kinsey Mill-hone. Now up to No. 15 -- "0 is for Outlaw" (Henry Holt, $26) -- Grafton is visiting Baltimore to discuss the latest in her string of best-selling novels. We decided to tell her story -- and Kinsey's -- from A to Z. (You'll have to follow the clues to find out where and when she will be in Baltimore.)A is for the alphabet. In hindsight, Grafton seems brilliant for picking a thematic device that makes her books not only memorable, but easy to arrange in chronological order.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 20, 2005
Ella May Stumpe, a former teacher and longtime Frederick resident who was in her 90s when she wrote her first book, died in her sleep Tuesday at the Record Street Home for Ladies in Frederick. She was 110. She was born Ella May Leonard, July 12, 1895, in Dunseith, N.D., during the second term of Grover Cleveland's presidency and the reign of Queen Victoria. When the Wright Brothers took to the air at Kitty Hawk, N.C., she was a precocious 8-year-old. Mrs. Stumpe spent the early years of her life in a sod house that her pioneer parents built.
NEWS
December 18, 2001
John Guedel, 88, who produced three of radio and television's most enduring programs - Art Linkletter's People Are Funny and House Party, and Groucho Marx's You Bet Your Life - died of heart failure Saturday at a hospital in West Hollywood, Calif. Mr. Guedel was originator of what might have been the first radio stunt game show with People are Funny, which moved from radio to television in 1954, and the first singing commercial on radio. Mr. Guedel created You Bet Your Life for Mr. Marx in 1947, including having a duck drop down and deliver a $100 bill whenever a contestant uttered the "secret word."
NEWS
By Josh Mitchel | July 31, 2005
Harford County Executive David R. Craig has released his first book, "Greetings from Havre de Grace," which he describes as a pictorial "history of the city through postcards." Craig, who co-wrote the book with local antiques dealer Mary L. Martin, wrote captions for the postcards, which feature Concord Point lighthouse, Tide water Marina and other land marks. "You can you see how the city has changed," Craig said. The 128-page book, published by Schiffer Publishing Ltd., was released this month and sells for $24.95.
FEATURES
By Bill Goodykoontz and Bill Goodykoontz,Arizona Republic | November 10, 1993
There sat Daryl Bernstein after school at a table in a buzzing McDonald's in Scottsdale, Ariz. Fairly normal stuff for a high school senior -- except that, instead of girls or sports, the 17-year-old was discussing publication of his second book.That's often how it is with Daryl: The setting's normal, as if you're talking to an everyday teen-ager, but it doesn't take long to realize you've got a successful author and businessman on your hands as well.The subject at hand is "Kids Can Succeed!
NEWS
July 27, 2000
An interview with Donna Swope, coordinator of Bookworms book club. What book are members reading this month? "At Home in Mitford," by Jan Karon. It's the first in a series of five books about a small-town Episcopal priest who marries in midlife - very light and humorous. We read everything from "Pride and Prejudice" to "Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood" to classics like Agatha Christie's first book, "Murder at the Vicarage." Occasionally, we have a meal together that fits in with the theme of the book.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.