Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFirst Book
IN THE NEWS

First Book

NEWS
January 20, 2005
Muff Singer, 62, who wrote or co-wrote more than 35 books for toddlers and preschoolers, died of ovarian cancer Sunday at her Los Angeles home. A former political activist and the wife of former City Comptroller Rick Tuttle, Ms. Singer published her first book in 1981 and turned to children's books in the 1980s after the birth of her daughter, Sarah. Many of her board-page books, including What Does Kitty See and Little Duck's Friends, came with a stuffed or squeaking toy of the story's main character.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 17, 2002
Area literacy groups invited to apply for grants BALTIMORE - First Book, a national nonprofit group that provides new books to low-income families, is seeking grant applications from literacy groups in Baltimore and Baltimore County interested in distributing books throughout their communities. Applicants must be tutoring, mentoring or family literacy group programs that work with low-income children in those jurisdictions. Applications are available by contacting Baltimore First Book at ndt5spring@aol.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | March 12, 2012
I face a tough choice this week: Start filling out my NCAA tournament bracket or continue with the Hunger Games trilogy. I finished the first book in Suzanne Collins' series over the weekend, just in time to clear the slate for a week of college hoops. Mid-March is generally the time that my reading goes on hiatus -- back-to-back-to-back-to-back basketball games will do that. And this year there's a special reason to watch: To see if my home-state team, the University of Connecticut Huskies, can defend its national championship.
NEWS
March 8, 2001
An interview with Charles Fleming, co-founder of Tehuti Book Club. How did your club get started? A friend of mine who worked with me, whose name is Bobbe Frasier - we started the club. ... We wanted to have a men's book club. We just felt like men have their own perspective on things, and we wanted to deal with that perspective. What book are members reading this month? For March, we're having a joint book club meeting [with a women's book club], and [the women's club] selected the book, and the name of that book is "Men Cry in the Dark" by Michael Baisden.
NEWS
December 18, 2001
John Guedel, 88, who produced three of radio and television's most enduring programs - Art Linkletter's People Are Funny and House Party, and Groucho Marx's You Bet Your Life - died of heart failure Saturday at a hospital in West Hollywood, Calif. Mr. Guedel was originator of what might have been the first radio stunt game show with People are Funny, which moved from radio to television in 1954, and the first singing commercial on radio. Mr. Guedel created You Bet Your Life for Mr. Marx in 1947, including having a duck drop down and deliver a $100 bill whenever a contestant uttered the "secret word."
NEWS
By Josh Mitchel | July 31, 2005
Harford County Executive David R. Craig has released his first book, "Greetings from Havre de Grace," which he describes as a pictorial "history of the city through postcards." Craig, who co-wrote the book with local antiques dealer Mary L. Martin, wrote captions for the postcards, which feature Concord Point lighthouse, Tide water Marina and other land marks. "You can you see how the city has changed," Craig said. The 128-page book, published by Schiffer Publishing Ltd., was released this month and sells for $24.95.
FEATURES
By Bill Goodykoontz and Bill Goodykoontz,Arizona Republic | November 10, 1993
There sat Daryl Bernstein after school at a table in a buzzing McDonald's in Scottsdale, Ariz. Fairly normal stuff for a high school senior -- except that, instead of girls or sports, the 17-year-old was discussing publication of his second book.That's often how it is with Daryl: The setting's normal, as if you're talking to an everyday teen-ager, but it doesn't take long to realize you've got a successful author and businessman on your hands as well.The subject at hand is "Kids Can Succeed!
NEWS
July 27, 2000
An interview with Donna Swope, coordinator of Bookworms book club. What book are members reading this month? "At Home in Mitford," by Jan Karon. It's the first in a series of five books about a small-town Episcopal priest who marries in midlife - very light and humorous. We read everything from "Pride and Prejudice" to "Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood" to classics like Agatha Christie's first book, "Murder at the Vicarage." Occasionally, we have a meal together that fits in with the theme of the book.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | December 4, 2013
Some time within the past week, 160,000 new books arrived in The City That Reads, a term I've neither heard nor uttered since the Kurt Schmoke mayoralty and its much-mocked motto ("The City That Bleeds," "The City That Breeds") faded into memory nearly 15 years ago. But, it's true: One hundred and sixty thousand children's books are being distributed free to Baltimore schoolteachers this week, and they, in turn, will distribute them to their students, most of whom are from low-income families lacking extensive libraries at home.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun Staff | August 1, 2004
Seeing Past Z: Nurturing the Imagination in a Fast-Forward World, by Beth Kephart. Norton. 192 pages. $23.95 When readers left young Jeremy, he was 9 years old and, with the help of his devoted mother, emerging into the world from a devastating diagnosis. In A Slant of the Sun, nominated for the National Book Award in 1998, free-lance writer Beth Kephart tells of learning that her toddler son suffered from a pervasive developmental disorder not unlike autism, and it describes how she and her husband helped him triumph over it. Despite the cheerful ending, the book is a haunting memoir of a mother's fear that her own failings contributed to her son's disability and of her determination to heal both him and herself.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.