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FEATURES
By Sandra Mathers and Sandra Mathers,Orlando Sentinel | January 11, 1994
For years, Debra Wert kept most of her ideas for children's stories filed away in her head.It took just one episode of "World News Tonight With Peter Jennings" back in 1987 to convince the former insurance company sales representative it was time to start writing.Ms. Wert, then 33, quit her job, moved in with her parents, pulled out a notebook and started her first book . . . in longhand.Today, the Longwood, Fla., children's author is on her way to becoming a publishing Wunderkind."Mac's Choice" didn't exactly hit the bookstores when it was printed five years ago, but it did make it into a few school systems in Virginia and Maryland.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun Staff | August 1, 2004
Seeing Past Z: Nurturing the Imagination in a Fast-Forward World, by Beth Kephart. Norton. 192 pages. $23.95 When readers left young Jeremy, he was 9 years old and, with the help of his devoted mother, emerging into the world from a devastating diagnosis. In A Slant of the Sun, nominated for the National Book Award in 1998, free-lance writer Beth Kephart tells of learning that her toddler son suffered from a pervasive developmental disorder not unlike autism, and it describes how she and her husband helped him triumph over it. Despite the cheerful ending, the book is a haunting memoir of a mother's fear that her own failings contributed to her son's disability and of her determination to heal both him and herself.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2012
[Spoiler alert: Do not read further in this interview if you have not read "A Storm of Swords," the third book in the series, "The Song of Fire and Ice. "] Scottish actor Richard Madden, 25, has broken into the spotlight by playing Robb Stark on HBO's hit show, "Game of Thrones. " As the second season of the show continues, Stark, the eldest son of the beheaded Ned Stark (Sean Bean), has been declared "King in the North," and has launched war against his family's sworn enemy, the Lannisters, who hold the Iron Throne.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2002
IT'S TWO YEARS now since JoAnn Fruchtman, owner of the Children's Bookstore in Roland Park, gathered her friends and said she had come up with an idea to get literature into the hands of Baltimore schoolchildren. The plan was simple in design and execution: Fruchtman would establish the Children's Bookstore Educational Foundation. City teachers would apply to the foundation for free books to be used as classroom supplements. Fruchtman's store would buy the books and sell them to the foundation at cost.
NEWS
By Georgia N. Alexakis and Georgia N. Alexakis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 27, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Under normal circumstances, any U.S. senator might have felt upstaged by a pair of bears and a monkey.But when Curious George and the Berenstain Bears interrupted Sen. Slade Gorton Thursday morning on the East Lawn of the Capitol, the Republican from Washington graciously yielded the spotlight.Gorton was there to help launch Book Bank, a national book donation program, and who better to get about 40 children excited about receiving free books than the book characters themselves?
FEATURES
By Athima Chansanchai | March 13, 2001
There's a new Harry Potter book in town. Well, actually two books, but before you or your child hyperventilate, you should know they're not the newest additions to the extraordinarily popular series by J.K. Rowling. The fifth installment of the saga isn't due out for at least another year. But two slim paperbacks were released yesterday - "Quidditch Through the Ages" and "Fantastic Beasts & Where To Find Them" - that promise fans the satisfaction of fresh material about the boy wizard and a chance to help out the newly created children's charity, Harry's Books fund.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Sun Staff Writer | January 4, 1995
In late January 1988, a pictorial book chronicling Glen Burnie's growth over the previous 100 years sold out 2,000 copies in three days. That spring, 3,000 second-edition copies sold out in 15 days.Or so it was thought.But one day in late November last year, Nicole Clary, executive director of the Northern Arundel Chamber of Commerce, was rummaging around in a storage room when she found four cases of the 100-page, white, hardcover books.The chamber quickly put the 400 books on sale, at $20 each, and already half of them have been sold.
FEATURES
By Randi Kest | February 17, 1999
When she was 6, children's author Jan Brett knew what she wanted to do when she grew up: create children's books. She loved to draw and used art to express herself. Brett's aspirations to write books led her to the Boston Museum of Fine Arts School in 1970. Eleven years later, her first book, ``Fritz and the Beautiful Horses,'' was published. Since then, Brett has written and illustrated more than two dozen books including the popular ``Berlioz the Bear'' and ``The Mitten.''Another childhood passion of Brett's was animals.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | March 5, 2012
With less than three weeks remaining before "The Hunger Games" movie is released, I thought it was time to join the 20-plus millions who have read books in Suzanne Collins' hit trilogy. (That and the contunued urging of my teen-age niece, K.T.) Collins' tale about the life-or-death competition among youngsters in post-apocalyptic North America was aimed at a young adult audience -- much like Stephenie Meyer's Twilight series -- but has swept far beyond that group.
NEWS
May 8, 2003
An interview with Marilyn Biegel, founding member of Bet Aviv Book Club. How did your club get started? We're part of Bet Aviv, a Reform Jewish congregation. We wanted to start a book club as part of other programs for the sisterhood of the congregation. We just formed in November, and we fluctuate between 12 and 16 members. What are you reading now? We're on our third book. It's Brat Farrar by Josephine Tey. It's a classic mystery novel that has been cherished by generations. The author is dead now. How did you choose this?
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