Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFirst Book
IN THE NEWS

First Book

NEWS
January 20, 2005
Muff Singer, 62, who wrote or co-wrote more than 35 books for toddlers and preschoolers, died of ovarian cancer Sunday at her Los Angeles home. A former political activist and the wife of former City Comptroller Rick Tuttle, Ms. Singer published her first book in 1981 and turned to children's books in the 1980s after the birth of her daughter, Sarah. Many of her board-page books, including What Does Kitty See and Little Duck's Friends, came with a stuffed or squeaking toy of the story's main character.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2004
The third movie made from J.K. Rowling's series of novels about a young wizard, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, opened in theaters this weekend. In August, Rowling's fifth book, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, is due out in paperback. Is there any end to Potter-mania? The numbers suggest not. Author J.K. Rowling's birthday: July 31, 1965 Harry Potter's birthday: July 31, 1980 Age Rowling began writing stories: 6 Year Rowling worked for Amnesty International in Africa: 1987 Year Rowling first imagined Harry Potter: 1990 Year Rowling taught English in Portugal: 1991 Year Rowling's daughter Jessica was born: 1993 Publisher's advance for the first book in 1996: $4,000 Number of years Rowling lived on the dole (British welfare)
NEWS
February 17, 2002
Area literacy groups invited to apply for grants BALTIMORE - First Book, a national nonprofit group that provides new books to low-income families, is seeking grant applications from literacy groups in Baltimore and Baltimore County interested in distributing books throughout their communities. Applicants must be tutoring, mentoring or family literacy group programs that work with low-income children in those jurisdictions. Applications are available by contacting Baltimore First Book at ndt5spring@aol.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | March 12, 2012
I face a tough choice this week: Start filling out my NCAA tournament bracket or continue with the Hunger Games trilogy. I finished the first book in Suzanne Collins' series over the weekend, just in time to clear the slate for a week of college hoops. Mid-March is generally the time that my reading goes on hiatus -- back-to-back-to-back-to-back basketball games will do that. And this year there's a special reason to watch: To see if my home-state team, the University of Connecticut Huskies, can defend its national championship.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | February 21, 2006
Nan Hayden Agle, an author whose numerous children's books included a series about the adventures of triplet boys and a story about a former slave, died Feb. 14 at Copper Ridge in Sykesville of complications from a fall. She was 100. She was born Anna Bradford Hayden on her family's Catonsville farm, Nancy's Fancy on Nunnery Lane - now part of the Academy Heights neighborhood. She was a 1923 graduate of Catonsville High School. In several autobiographical articles Mrs. Agle wrote for The Sun, she recalled an inspiring high school English teacher who "sits enthroned in the highest seat of memory.
NEWS
By PETER JENSEN and PETER JENSEN,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1999
When children's writer Mary Koski proudly read her first book to a neighbor's daughter, she wasn't prepared for her reaction."Why," asked the little girl, pointing to the book's heroine, "are her feet so huge?"Koski was surprised that a youngster would focus on such a trivial matter. The book, after all, was about how to dial 911 in an emergency. But when the same question was repeated by children during a subsequent book tour, the reason dawned on her."We live in a culture where kids at a young age are focused on their bodies, particularly differences in our bodies," says Koski, 48, the former head of a Duluth, Minn.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | November 25, 2007
The walls of her Gambrills home are filled with paintings of barns, churches, historic landmarks and old houses from across the state. For more than two decades, Mildred Bottner Anderson visited those sites, sometimes taking photographs that she brought back to her studio and used to paint watercolor renderings. Other times she painted on location. In many cases, the places depicted in her artwork were at risk of being demolished, she said. Anderson said she felt a duty to preserve them in the paintings.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippmann | November 3, 1999
Nineteen years ago, Sue Grafton published her first "Alphabet" mystery, "A is for Alibi," introducing female private investigator Kinsey Mill-hone. Now up to No. 15 -- "0 is for Outlaw" (Henry Holt, $26) -- Grafton is visiting Baltimore to discuss the latest in her string of best-selling novels. We decided to tell her story -- and Kinsey's -- from A to Z. (You'll have to follow the clues to find out where and when she will be in Baltimore.)A is for the alphabet. In hindsight, Grafton seems brilliant for picking a thematic device that makes her books not only memorable, but easy to arrange in chronological order.
NEWS
December 18, 2001
John Guedel, 88, who produced three of radio and television's most enduring programs - Art Linkletter's People Are Funny and House Party, and Groucho Marx's You Bet Your Life - died of heart failure Saturday at a hospital in West Hollywood, Calif. Mr. Guedel was originator of what might have been the first radio stunt game show with People are Funny, which moved from radio to television in 1954, and the first singing commercial on radio. Mr. Guedel created You Bet Your Life for Mr. Marx in 1947, including having a duck drop down and deliver a $100 bill whenever a contestant uttered the "secret word."
NEWS
By Josh Mitchel | July 31, 2005
Harford County Executive David R. Craig has released his first book, "Greetings from Havre de Grace," which he describes as a pictorial "history of the city through postcards." Craig, who co-wrote the book with local antiques dealer Mary L. Martin, wrote captions for the postcards, which feature Concord Point lighthouse, Tide water Marina and other land marks. "You can you see how the city has changed," Craig said. The 128-page book, published by Schiffer Publishing Ltd., was released this month and sells for $24.95.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.