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ENTERTAINMENT
By Victoria A. Brownworth and By Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | March 10, 2002
Fingersmith, by Sarah Waters. Riverhead Books. 520 pages. 25.95. Some novelists burst onto the literary scene with a brilliant first book and each subsequent book is weaker and more disappointing than the last. Then there are those few whose first book is exciting and fresh and each new work is ever fuller, deeper. English novelist Sarah Waters fits the latter category. Her debut novel, Tipping the Velvet (Riverhead, 1999) was a New York Times Notable Book; her second novel, Affinity (Riverhead)
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NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1999
Maryland's first small-town poet laureate, whose verse celebrates Union Bridge and its 1,000 souls, will be immortalized with a volume of his work.P. Richard Eichman, who became the town's poet laureate in February 1998, is ailing, and local businesses have donated money to publish his first book of verse. The town cement plant, railroad and millworks donated the $5,000.Eichman, who laments the lack of meter in modern poetry, plans to call the book along the lines of "Poems After the Old Manner."
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1999
WHATEVER YOU think of "whole language," the philosophy that children learn to read by immersion in literature, there's one thing to be said for it:It has filled the shelves of grade school classrooms and literate homes with a wealth of excellent books, many of them astonishingly illustrated. Gone are the stilted language and controlled vocabulary of the old "basal readers," replaced by stories that might have bigger words than beginning readers can read but that take adults and children alike on wild flights of the imagination.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchel | July 31, 2005
Harford County Executive David R. Craig has released his first book, "Greetings from Havre de Grace," which he describes as a pictorial "history of the city through postcards." Craig, who co-wrote the book with local antiques dealer Mary L. Martin, wrote captions for the postcards, which feature Concord Point lighthouse, Tide water Marina and other land marks. "You can you see how the city has changed," Craig said. The 128-page book, published by Schiffer Publishing Ltd., was released this month and sells for $24.95.
NEWS
December 18, 2001
John Guedel, 88, who produced three of radio and television's most enduring programs - Art Linkletter's People Are Funny and House Party, and Groucho Marx's You Bet Your Life - died of heart failure Saturday at a hospital in West Hollywood, Calif. Mr. Guedel was originator of what might have been the first radio stunt game show with People are Funny, which moved from radio to television in 1954, and the first singing commercial on radio. Mr. Guedel created You Bet Your Life for Mr. Marx in 1947, including having a duck drop down and deliver a $100 bill whenever a contestant uttered the "secret word."
NEWS
July 27, 2000
An interview with Donna Swope, coordinator of Bookworms book club. What book are members reading this month? "At Home in Mitford," by Jan Karon. It's the first in a series of five books about a small-town Episcopal priest who marries in midlife - very light and humorous. We read everything from "Pride and Prejudice" to "Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood" to classics like Agatha Christie's first book, "Murder at the Vicarage." Occasionally, we have a meal together that fits in with the theme of the book.
FEATURES
By Bill Goodykoontz and Bill Goodykoontz,Arizona Republic | November 10, 1993
There sat Daryl Bernstein after school at a table in a buzzing McDonald's in Scottsdale, Ariz. Fairly normal stuff for a high school senior -- except that, instead of girls or sports, the 17-year-old was discussing publication of his second book.That's often how it is with Daryl: The setting's normal, as if you're talking to an everyday teen-ager, but it doesn't take long to realize you've got a successful author and businessman on your hands as well.The subject at hand is "Kids Can Succeed!
NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2011
It's easy to miss the little two-story, boarded-up house behind the Historical Society of Baltimore County in Cockeysville. Known as "the Pest House," it was once a haven for patients suffering from contagious diseases, such as smallpox. Built in 1872, it's been empty for decades. But efforts to convert it into a research center for county African-American history would take the old stone building beyond its dreary past into a brighter future, provided fundraisers can obtain more than $300,000 for the renovation job. Lead organizer Louis S. Diggs, for whom the center would be named, has written a dozen books on early African-American life in the county, exploring the history of Piney Grove, Turners Station, Catonsville, and Belltown in Owings Mills.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
Ronald S. Coddington, an author and editor, has spent nearly four decades collecting Civil War-era images — especially cartes de visite, his favorite. Out of a collection of 2,500 images he has assembled, 1,500 are cartes de visite, with the remainder being daguerreotypes, ambrotypes and tintypes. In 2004, his first collection of images resulted in "Faces of the Civil War: An Album of Union Soldiers and Their Stories" published by the Johns Hopkins University Press. The format he used, in which he was able to research and write a thumbnail biography of each person, was so successful he did a second volume, "Faces of the Confederacy: An Album of Southern Soldiers and Their Stories," published in 2008.
NEWS
By Georgia N. Alexakis and Georgia N. Alexakis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 27, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Under normal circumstances, any U.S. senator might have felt upstaged by a pair of bears and a monkey.But when Curious George and the Berenstain Bears interrupted Sen. Slade Gorton Thursday morning on the East Lawn of the Capitol, the Republican from Washington graciously yielded the spotlight.Gorton was there to help launch Book Bank, a national book donation program, and who better to get about 40 children excited about receiving free books than the book characters themselves?
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