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FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | June 23, 2012
If you ever thought writing a book was tough, just consider the pain of marketing it. One example: the 66-city tour by Loyola University Maryland writing professor Ron Tanner in a beat-up van -- a voyage that has included savage mosquitos, a busted toilet and a fair share of overnights in Walmart parking lots. (You can follow along on his blog. ) Tanner is promoting his latest book, " From Animal House to Our House: A Love Story," which describes the work in renovating a Baltimore rowhouse.
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NEWS
January 20, 2005
Muff Singer, 62, who wrote or co-wrote more than 35 books for toddlers and preschoolers, died of ovarian cancer Sunday at her Los Angeles home. A former political activist and the wife of former City Comptroller Rick Tuttle, Ms. Singer published her first book in 1981 and turned to children's books in the 1980s after the birth of her daughter, Sarah. Many of her board-page books, including What Does Kitty See and Little Duck's Friends, came with a stuffed or squeaking toy of the story's main character.
NEWS
February 17, 2002
Area literacy groups invited to apply for grants BALTIMORE - First Book, a national nonprofit group that provides new books to low-income families, is seeking grant applications from literacy groups in Baltimore and Baltimore County interested in distributing books throughout their communities. Applicants must be tutoring, mentoring or family literacy group programs that work with low-income children in those jurisdictions. Applications are available by contacting Baltimore First Book at ndt5spring@aol.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | March 12, 2012
I face a tough choice this week: Start filling out my NCAA tournament bracket or continue with the Hunger Games trilogy. I finished the first book in Suzanne Collins' series over the weekend, just in time to clear the slate for a week of college hoops. Mid-March is generally the time that my reading goes on hiatus -- back-to-back-to-back-to-back basketball games will do that. And this year there's a special reason to watch: To see if my home-state team, the University of Connecticut Huskies, can defend its national championship.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2012
It's not that I mind being treated as an oracle - it's a little flattering to be consulted on points of language and usage. But I sometimes wonder why people write to me for answers that are, or ought to be, near at hand to them. When someone poses a question about usage, the first book I usually reach for (yes, little ones, Mr. John still believes in books) is Bryan Garner's Garmer's Modern American Usage . Though his prefaces bristle a little about descriptivists, he is the very model of a modern moderate prescriptivist.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 20, 2005
Ella May Stumpe, a former teacher and longtime Frederick resident who was in her 90s when she wrote her first book, died in her sleep Tuesday at the Record Street Home for Ladies in Frederick. She was 110. She was born Ella May Leonard, July 12, 1895, in Dunseith, N.D., during the second term of Grover Cleveland's presidency and the reign of Queen Victoria. When the Wright Brothers took to the air at Kitty Hawk, N.C., she was a precocious 8-year-old. Mrs. Stumpe spent the early years of her life in a sod house that her pioneer parents built.
NEWS
December 18, 2001
John Guedel, 88, who produced three of radio and television's most enduring programs - Art Linkletter's People Are Funny and House Party, and Groucho Marx's You Bet Your Life - died of heart failure Saturday at a hospital in West Hollywood, Calif. Mr. Guedel was originator of what might have been the first radio stunt game show with People are Funny, which moved from radio to television in 1954, and the first singing commercial on radio. Mr. Guedel created You Bet Your Life for Mr. Marx in 1947, including having a duck drop down and deliver a $100 bill whenever a contestant uttered the "secret word."
FEATURES
By Bill Goodykoontz and Bill Goodykoontz,Arizona Republic | November 10, 1993
There sat Daryl Bernstein after school at a table in a buzzing McDonald's in Scottsdale, Ariz. Fairly normal stuff for a high school senior -- except that, instead of girls or sports, the 17-year-old was discussing publication of his second book.That's often how it is with Daryl: The setting's normal, as if you're talking to an everyday teen-ager, but it doesn't take long to realize you've got a successful author and businessman on your hands as well.The subject at hand is "Kids Can Succeed!
NEWS
July 27, 2000
An interview with Donna Swope, coordinator of Bookworms book club. What book are members reading this month? "At Home in Mitford," by Jan Karon. It's the first in a series of five books about a small-town Episcopal priest who marries in midlife - very light and humorous. We read everything from "Pride and Prejudice" to "Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood" to classics like Agatha Christie's first book, "Murder at the Vicarage." Occasionally, we have a meal together that fits in with the theme of the book.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | February 19, 2012
A story for Black History Month. Bryan Stevenson is director of the Equal Justice Initiative, a Montgomery, Ala.-based organization he founded in 1989 to provide legal representation for the indigent and incarcerated. The EJI ( www.eji.org ) doesn't charge its clients but, says Mr. Stevenson, he will sometimes require them to read selected books. Last year, Mr. Stevenson sent two books to prisoner Mark Melvin, who is doing life for a murder he committed when he was 14. One was "Mountains Beyond Mountains," about a doctor's struggle to bring medical services to Haiti.
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