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By Dave Rosenthal | March 12, 2012
I face a tough choice this week: Start filling out my NCAA tournament bracket or continue with the Hunger Games trilogy. I finished the first book in Suzanne Collins' series over the weekend, just in time to clear the slate for a week of college hoops. Mid-March is generally the time that my reading goes on hiatus -- back-to-back-to-back-to-back basketball games will do that. And this year there's a special reason to watch: To see if my home-state team, the University of Connecticut Huskies, can defend its national championship.
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NEWS
By Josh Mitchel | July 31, 2005
Harford County Executive David R. Craig has released his first book, "Greetings from Havre de Grace," which he describes as a pictorial "history of the city through postcards." Craig, who co-wrote the book with local antiques dealer Mary L. Martin, wrote captions for the postcards, which feature Concord Point lighthouse, Tide water Marina and other land marks. "You can you see how the city has changed," Craig said. The 128-page book, published by Schiffer Publishing Ltd., was released this month and sells for $24.95.
NEWS
December 18, 2001
John Guedel, 88, who produced three of radio and television's most enduring programs - Art Linkletter's People Are Funny and House Party, and Groucho Marx's You Bet Your Life - died of heart failure Saturday at a hospital in West Hollywood, Calif. Mr. Guedel was originator of what might have been the first radio stunt game show with People are Funny, which moved from radio to television in 1954, and the first singing commercial on radio. Mr. Guedel created You Bet Your Life for Mr. Marx in 1947, including having a duck drop down and deliver a $100 bill whenever a contestant uttered the "secret word."
FEATURES
By Bill Goodykoontz and Bill Goodykoontz,Arizona Republic | November 10, 1993
There sat Daryl Bernstein after school at a table in a buzzing McDonald's in Scottsdale, Ariz. Fairly normal stuff for a high school senior -- except that, instead of girls or sports, the 17-year-old was discussing publication of his second book.That's often how it is with Daryl: The setting's normal, as if you're talking to an everyday teen-ager, but it doesn't take long to realize you've got a successful author and businessman on your hands as well.The subject at hand is "Kids Can Succeed!
NEWS
July 27, 2000
An interview with Donna Swope, coordinator of Bookworms book club. What book are members reading this month? "At Home in Mitford," by Jan Karon. It's the first in a series of five books about a small-town Episcopal priest who marries in midlife - very light and humorous. We read everything from "Pride and Prejudice" to "Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood" to classics like Agatha Christie's first book, "Murder at the Vicarage." Occasionally, we have a meal together that fits in with the theme of the book.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | December 4, 2013
Some time within the past week, 160,000 new books arrived in The City That Reads, a term I've neither heard nor uttered since the Kurt Schmoke mayoralty and its much-mocked motto ("The City That Bleeds," "The City That Breeds") faded into memory nearly 15 years ago. But, it's true: One hundred and sixty thousand children's books are being distributed free to Baltimore schoolteachers this week, and they, in turn, will distribute them to their students, most of whom are from low-income families lacking extensive libraries at home.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1997
Ahem, folks: An aardvark is creeping onto our cultural landscape.Unlike other creatures that television makes ubiquitous, this one is neither fluffy nor purple nor wimpy. He's someone for whom the world is an uncertain place, and he's trying to find his way, with humor.His name is Arthur. He wears huge glasses and an occasional bow tie, frets over his essays, thinks his wisecracking little sister D. W. is the world's biggest pest. A true nerd, is Arthur.But his debut on television after 20 years in books has been so successful that nerds may never again be uncool.
NEWS
March 20, 2012
Y ou may love reading "The Hunger Games" book trilogy, but do you have plans to camp out for the premiere? Would you try out a recipe for Katniss' favorite lamb stew with dry plums? "The Hunger Games" has morphed into a pop-culture phenomenon, with rabid fans who express their obsessions in a litany of ways. Here's a quick rundown. It's an event In Los Angeles a veritable tent city sprouted up before the premiere, bustling with fans waving signs anticipating cast-member visits.
NEWS
By Georgia N. Alexakis and Georgia N. Alexakis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 27, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Under normal circumstances, any U.S. senator might have felt upstaged by a pair of bears and a monkey.But when Curious George and the Berenstain Bears interrupted Sen. Slade Gorton Thursday morning on the East Lawn of the Capitol, the Republican from Washington graciously yielded the spotlight.Gorton was there to help launch Book Bank, a national book donation program, and who better to get about 40 children excited about receiving free books than the book characters themselves?
FEATURES
By Athima Chansanchai | March 13, 2001
There's a new Harry Potter book in town. Well, actually two books, but before you or your child hyperventilate, you should know they're not the newest additions to the extraordinarily popular series by J.K. Rowling. The fifth installment of the saga isn't due out for at least another year. But two slim paperbacks were released yesterday - "Quidditch Through the Ages" and "Fantastic Beasts & Where To Find Them" - that promise fans the satisfaction of fresh material about the boy wizard and a chance to help out the newly created children's charity, Harry's Books fund.
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