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NEWS
December 5, 2009
NEW YORK - A rare copy of Edgar Allan Poe's first book has sold for $662,500, smashing the previous record price for American literature. The copy of "Tamerlane and Other Poems" had been estimated to sell Friday for between $500,000 and $700,000 at Christie's auction house in New York City. The previous record is believed to be $250,000 for a copy of the same book sold nearly two decades ago. The 40-page collection of poems was published in 1827. Poe wrote the book shortly after moving to Boston to start his literary career.
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FEATURES
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
Molly Shattuck opens the front door of her sprawling brick North Baltimore home in a blur of color and energy. It's 10 a.m. on a gray February day, and she's wearing a tight purple dress that highlights her famously firm physique. Her blond hair is twirled into loose curls that descend past her shoulders, her lips are brightly glossed, and her blue eyes are accented with sea-green liner. Her feet are clad in scuffed pink slippers to protect the marble and wood floors, though she'll slip into nude 4-inch peep-toe Jessica Simpson pumps for photographs.
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NEWS
By Lisa Breslin and Lisa Breslin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 21, 2002
WHAT STARTED as a letter of advice to a daughter turning 30 blossomed into a commissioned book series for one Carroll County woman and her best friend. Finksburg resident Peggy Stout and Jean Aziz of Columbia have been friends for more than 25 years. Their friendship has been peppered with late-night talks and tears, with getting to know each other's families, and with swapping advice about raising children and the work world. Much of that advice, as well as wisdom gleaned from interviews with more than 50 women throughout the United States, is part of Stout and Aziz's first book, Wise Women Speak to the Woman Turning 30. The book is the first in a series that has been commissioned and marketed by Capital Books in Sterling, Va. Future books in the Wise Women Speak series will include advice about marriage, parenthood, and surviving a serious illness, surviving the loss of a loved one, retirement, and achieving balance in a busy life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2013
The author Madison Smartt Bell's 16th work of fiction, a book of short stories called "Zig Zag Wanderer" is guaranteed to make the author absolutely no money whatsoever. Nada. Zilch. Zip. Not one blessed penny. And he wouldn't have it any other way. Bell's previous 13 novels and two short story collections have been released by mainstream publishers and have been finalists for such prizes as the PEN/Faulkner and National Book awards. He is best known for his trilogy about the Haitian slave uprising of 1791.
NEWS
August 22, 1999
Move over, Oprah. Now Reba has a book club -- and a role in a national literacy organization.Country singer Reba McEntire has become national spokeswoman for First Book, a Washington-based nonprofit organization that works with local literacy groups to provide new books and tutoring to needy children.Along with that role, there is Reba's First Book Club, a national program intended to "encourage children and their families to discover the magic of books, as well as help raise funds to buy new books for homeless and disadvantaged children across America."
NEWS
By BRADLEY OLSON and BRADLEY OLSON,SUN REPORTER | June 7, 2006
While David Danelo was in Iraq two years ago, he was "one of those guys" who wrote home about once a month to let friends and family know how things were going. As a Marine Corps captain in Fallujah -- an insurgent stronghold in the Sunni triangle -- he had plenty to say in his "updates from the front." The e-mails were passed around by friends and family and eventually caught the eye of Steven Pressfield, the author of Gates of Fire. The historical novel chronicles the Battle of Thermopylae, during which about 7,000 Greek allies held off millions of Persians in a mountain pass for three days in 480 B.C. Pressfield, whose work is popular with Marines, told Danelo he was a good writer, which made the young captain feel like "Babe Ruth had just told me I was a good baseball player."
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 20, 2005
By Maryland standards, this has been an unusually cold March. But to Havre de Grace resident Lucille Maistros, the brisk, windy days are no big deal. Maistros grew up in northern Vermont, where March is considered the dead of winter. "It's only 500 miles away, but up there it's going to look like January for another six weeks," she said last week. Her hometown, St. Johnsbury, just got 6 inches of snow, she said. Maistros describes her Vermont childhood in her first book, Growing Up Cold: a memoir of growing up cold, but longing to be cool, in 1950s Vermont.
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun reporter | August 5, 2007
Harford County is getting its own First Book, a nonprofit organization that gives books to underprivileged children. Harford and Cecil county residents are forming a local advisory board for First Book. The first batch of books will be distributed in September in Edgewood, according to the organization. Leading the effort is Veronica Jaynes, who is opening a day care center. A year ago, Jaynes moved to Street from Camden, N.J. "We had a First Book advisory board in Camden - a large one. We did readings with children, and I wanted to bring that idea here," Jaynes said.
NEWS
By DAVID L. GREENE and DAVID L. GREENE,SUN STAFF | January 31, 1999
"The Very Hungry Caterpillar" slithered beside a neat row of desks and across the floor of a classroom in Sandtown. More accurately, it was 7-year-old Tierra Williams -- her body slouched over archlike, feet and palms gliding forward along the carpet -- acting out the lead character in her favorite children's book of the same name, by Eric Carle. "He eats apples, pears, oranges," Tierra said. "What else did he eat, Travon?""Strawberries and leaves," piped in New Song Community Learning Center classmate Travon Hopkins, also 7.The caterpillar eventually became stuffed, formed a cocoon, and turned into a butterfly.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2013
Joe Mechlinski, CEO and co-founder of Canton-based management consulting firm entreQuest, has worked with more than 400 businesses since starting the company 12 years ago. Last month, he released his first book, "Grow Regardless: Of Your Business' Size, Your Industry or the Economy … and Despite the Government. " Mechlinski — who grew up in Highlandtown and graduated from Patterson High School and Johns Hopkins University, where he earned a bachelor's degree in economics — describes his book as a "how-to guide for growing a small to midsize business in difficult economic times.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | December 4, 2013
Some time within the past week, 160,000 new books arrived in The City That Reads, a term I've neither heard nor uttered since the Kurt Schmoke mayoralty and its much-mocked motto ("The City That Bleeds," "The City That Breeds") faded into memory nearly 15 years ago. But, it's true: One hundred and sixty thousand children's books are being distributed free to Baltimore schoolteachers this week, and they, in turn, will distribute them to their students, most of whom are from low-income families lacking extensive libraries at home.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
Ronald S. Coddington, an author and editor, has spent nearly four decades collecting Civil War-era images — especially cartes de visite, his favorite. Out of a collection of 2,500 images he has assembled, 1,500 are cartes de visite, with the remainder being daguerreotypes, ambrotypes and tintypes. In 2004, his first collection of images resulted in "Faces of the Civil War: An Album of Union Soldiers and Their Stories" published by the Johns Hopkins University Press. The format he used, in which he was able to research and write a thumbnail biography of each person, was so successful he did a second volume, "Faces of the Confederacy: An Album of Southern Soldiers and Their Stories," published in 2008.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2013
Because the Baltimore-area novelist Alice McDermott possesses a painterly eye that delights in the way things look and sound and smell and taste, it can be easy to miss her underlying focus. For the National Book Award-winning author, each small sensory jolt that originates in this world is a gateway to a more incorporeal realm. "Marie takes a spiritual journey in this novel," McDermott says of the heroine of her newly released book, "Someone: A Novel. " "She goes from not understanding at all to not quite understanding to understanding a little bit. Early in the book, her brother makes an absolutely outrageous proposition from the Gospel of Matthew, that all the hairs on our heads are counted and that we're not alone.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2013
Joe Mechlinski, CEO and co-founder of Canton-based management consulting firm entreQuest, has worked with more than 400 businesses since starting the company 12 years ago. Last month, he released his first book, "Grow Regardless: Of Your Business' Size, Your Industry or the Economy … and Despite the Government. " Mechlinski — who grew up in Highlandtown and graduated from Patterson High School and Johns Hopkins University, where he earned a bachelor's degree in economics — describes his book as a "how-to guide for growing a small to midsize business in difficult economic times.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2012
In her historical novels, Annapolis author Erika Robuck invents everyday men and women whose lives intersect with those of acclaimed American authors. She figures that fiction is sometimes the best way of learning something true. "I'm interested in famous writers and how they used the people in their lives," Robuck says. "They take things, and they don't always ask permission. It's such a betrayal. " Robuck's current novel, "Hemingway's Girl," tells the story of Mariella Bennet, a young, half-Cuban housemaid who must negotiate the marital minefield created by Ernest Hemingway and his second wife, Pauline Pfeiffer.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | September 25, 2012
J.K. Rowling's first stab at adult literature, "The Casual Vacancy," won't be released until Thursday, but it's already headed to the top of the best seller lists. It's currently at #3 by Amazon and #2 by Barnes & Noble. Not a bad start. Of course, millions of adults have read Rowling's Harry Potter series, but this will be Rowling's first book aimed squarely at an older market. According to news reports, the 500-plus page book deals with a small town called Pagford, and a local election that exposes the gulf between its middle class and the poor who live nearby.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 16, 1996
You might expect public television's "Genesis: A Living Conversation" to start at the beginning with the first chapter of the first book of the Bible. After all, if it was good enough for GodBut not television. PBS' "Genesis," the highly publicized 10-hour discussion series with Bill Moyers as host, begins tonight with the story of Cain and Abel -- Chapter Four -- in an hourlong program titled "The First Murder."It is a striking choice not only for reasons of chronology, but also because it is the one hour that features secular writers instead of religious leaders talking about the text: Faye Kellerman, Mary Gordon, Oscar Hijuelos, Charles Johnson, Rebecca Goldstein and John Barth.
FEATURES
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
Molly Shattuck opens the front door of her sprawling brick North Baltimore home in a blur of color and energy. It's 10 a.m. on a gray February day, and she's wearing a tight purple dress that highlights her famously firm physique. Her blond hair is twirled into loose curls that descend past her shoulders, her lips are brightly glossed, and her blue eyes are accented with sea-green liner. Her feet are clad in scuffed pink slippers to protect the marble and wood floors, though she'll slip into nude 4-inch peep-toe Jessica Simpson pumps for photographs.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | September 22, 2012
Even as I rejoice for the hometown Baltimore Orioles, I'm depressed by the play of another favorite team, the N.Y. Mets. Another spring filled with hope, another summer of depressing reality. But there is one bright spot: R.A. Dickey, who is chasing a 20-win season with an improbable knuckleball that was developed late in his career. Dickey, one of the subjects of the new documentary, "Knuckleball!" appears to be a thinker as well as pitcher. He has already written a memoir, “Wherever I Wind Up,” and has a deal to write three children's books.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | June 23, 2012
If you ever thought writing a book was tough, just consider the pain of marketing it. One example: the 66-city tour by Loyola University Maryland writing professor Ron Tanner in a beat-up van -- a voyage that has included savage mosquitos, a busted toilet and a fair share of overnights in Walmart parking lots. (You can follow along on his blog. ) Tanner is promoting his latest book, " From Animal House to Our House: A Love Story," which describes the work in renovating a Baltimore rowhouse.
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