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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | November 17, 2000
Benjamin S. Markley Jr., who built charter, pleasure and crabbers' boats in a family-owned boat yard in Middle River, died Nov. 10 of a heart attack at Fort Pierce, Fla. He was 65 and lived in the Middleborough section of Baltimore County. His parents bought the marina and boat yard on Nanticoke Road in 1945. When he was age 9, he started helping his father at Markley's Boat Yard, painting and varnishing boats. He built his first boat - a wooden Chris-Craft kit boat - when he was age 16 with the help of Constance "Connie" Clark, whom he married after graduating from Kenwood High School in 1954.
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NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2011
Maryland recorded its first boating accident of the year Tuesday morning when a Dorchester waterman fell from his boat and drowned while power dredging for oysters, Natural Resources Police reported. Samuel Edwin Todd, 59, of Crocheron was working at the mouth of Goose Creek and Fishing Bay at about 9:30 a.m. when the dredge he had just emptied failed to drop back into the water, swung back toward the deck and struck him. The force of the blow knocked him overboard, the NRP said. Todd's mate was not familiar with how the boat operated, and ran to the VHF radio to call for help.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,Special to the Sun | April 25, 2004
When the Pride of Baltimore sank in a squall in the Atlantic in May 1986, many local leaders had no interest in building a replacement boat. The mayor, William Donald Schaefer, in particular considered it a bad idea. But the public felt differently. The same day that news of the sinking reached Baltimore, people began raising money for a new goodwill ship. A radio station launched an on-air drive, jars of pennies and dimes collected by children began arriving in the office of Pride of Baltimore Inc., and before long, local and state leaders committed to the idea.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,sun reporter | June 4, 2007
It looks like hard work and not much of a vacation, given that these T-shirted folks are toiling in a garage-like shop, rather than strolling the waterfront tourist district during their stay in Annapolis. Their souvenirs from Maryland's capital are the wooden kayaks they are building. In a light industrial and business section of the city, a small class of grown-ups is gluing and 'glassing, stirring and sanding. For them, the lure to the city that bills itself as the nation's sailing capital is not the water.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 7, 1999
MIAMI -- In perhaps the worst immigrant-smuggling disaster at sea off South Florida, at least four people are dead and up to 36 are missing after two boats carrying Haitians sank halfway between Palm Beach County and the Bahamas.The U.S. Coast Guard managed to rescue three Haitian men from the choppy seas 30 miles east of Palm Beach. They continued to search for survivors as far north as Cape Canaveral last night but had found no one since 8 a.m.Only two of the dead were recovered by the Coast Guard cutter Matagorda.
SPORTS
January 6, 1998
Status: Day 1, Leg 4Standings:Boat, Nautical miles to finish1. Toshiba, 712.02. Swedish Match, 712.73. Merit Cup, 718.74. Silk Cut, 722.2hTC 5. Chessie Racing, 722.86. EF Language, 724.77. Innovation Kvaerner, 734.08. BrunelSunergy, 741.49. EF Education, 747.0 (as of 18: 02: 51 GMT)Boat beat: The American entry Toshiba, with Dennis Conner at the helm, took the lead today in the 1,270-nautical-mile fourth leg of the Whitbread Round the World yacht race from Sydney to Auckland, New Zealand.
SPORTS
By Bruce Stannard and Bruce Stannard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 29, 1999
AUCKLAND, New Zealand -- When Paul Cayard isn't racing sailboats, he's climbing mountains.Right now in Auckland he's on the water racing and climbing higher and higher up the America's Cup mountain. What he sees up there is the Italian flag planted on a plateau.The whole focus of his AmericaOne campaign is to overhaul Italian entry Prada in the race for the summit and the ultimate contest with the New Zealand defender.The challenger semifinals, which begin Sunday, will go a long way to determine who will meet defender Team New Zealand for the America's Cup in mid-February.
SPORTS
By GILBERT A. LEWTHWAITE and GILBERT A. LEWTHWAITE,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 11, 1998
SAO SEBASTIAO, Brazil - The next leg in the Whitbread Round the World Race is perhaps the trickiest. The winds can be tTC fickle, the Doldrums have to be crossed, and the north-flowing Gulf Stream must be negotiated before the 4,750 nautical miles to Fort Lauderdale, Fla., are finished.The secret of success in Leg 6, according to American Paul Cayard, skipper of overall leader EF Language of Sweden, will be to seize an early lead off the east coast of Brazil, be lucky in finding a path through the Doldrums, and be first to pick up the trade winds in the Caribbean.
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,Sun Staff Writer | November 17, 1994
Tony Smith believes in fate.Six months after he moved to the United States, his Mayo factory burned down, destroying molds for the Telstar, a three-hull sailboat he had designed in college.He spent the next six months developing the the 34-foot-long Gemini. Fourteen years later, the boats have made him the country's largest manufacturer of cruising catamarans."If something happens to you, you say, 'Why did it happen? " said Mr. Smith, 50, whose voice still bears a trace of his native Britain.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff writer | October 2, 1991
Jeremy Leach leans against the boat's unfinished wooden hull, pats its white cedar bottom and talks like he's built a million of them."When you think about it, we're glad we got this part done. Because this is the hardest part. The rest is a breeze."Jeremy is 12 years old, a student at Southern Middle School. The 30-foot Hooper Island Draketail is the first boat he's ever helped build. He's been at it since January, and since those first tentative strokes of the block plane, the Fairhaven boy has apparently gained some assurance on the subject of boat-building.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,Special to the Sun | April 25, 2004
When the Pride of Baltimore sank in a squall in the Atlantic in May 1986, many local leaders had no interest in building a replacement boat. The mayor, William Donald Schaefer, in particular considered it a bad idea. But the public felt differently. The same day that news of the sinking reached Baltimore, people began raising money for a new goodwill ship. A radio station launched an on-air drive, jars of pennies and dimes collected by children began arriving in the office of Pride of Baltimore Inc., and before long, local and state leaders committed to the idea.
NEWS
By Douglas Lamborne and Douglas Lamborne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 23, 2001
MIGHT A MAN who has built some 50 boats over his 52 years, who owns a fleet of seven boats, be described as a bit eccentric? "Well, yes," admits Joe Fernon. He built his first boat at age 10 and launched it into Talla Bayou in Mississippi. "My uncle had to help me build it," Fernon said. "My dad wasn't very handy, being an English professor." His father taught at Tulane, and the New Orleans background helps explain the name of Fernon's little business, Chesapeake Boats Bayou. For $290, Fernon will provide 45 hours of instruction on how to build a 9 1/2 -foot craft called Martha's Tender.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | November 17, 2000
Benjamin S. Markley Jr., who built charter, pleasure and crabbers' boats in a family-owned boat yard in Middle River, died Nov. 10 of a heart attack at Fort Pierce, Fla. He was 65 and lived in the Middleborough section of Baltimore County. His parents bought the marina and boat yard on Nanticoke Road in 1945. When he was age 9, he started helping his father at Markley's Boat Yard, painting and varnishing boats. He built his first boat - a wooden Chris-Craft kit boat - when he was age 16 with the help of Constance "Connie" Clark, whom he married after graduating from Kenwood High School in 1954.
SPORTS
By Bruce Stannard and Bruce Stannard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 29, 1999
AUCKLAND, New Zealand -- When Paul Cayard isn't racing sailboats, he's climbing mountains.Right now in Auckland he's on the water racing and climbing higher and higher up the America's Cup mountain. What he sees up there is the Italian flag planted on a plateau.The whole focus of his AmericaOne campaign is to overhaul Italian entry Prada in the race for the summit and the ultimate contest with the New Zealand defender.The challenger semifinals, which begin Sunday, will go a long way to determine who will meet defender Team New Zealand for the America's Cup in mid-February.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 7, 1999
MIAMI -- In perhaps the worst immigrant-smuggling disaster at sea off South Florida, at least four people are dead and up to 36 are missing after two boats carrying Haitians sank halfway between Palm Beach County and the Bahamas.The U.S. Coast Guard managed to rescue three Haitian men from the choppy seas 30 miles east of Palm Beach. They continued to search for survivors as far north as Cape Canaveral last night but had found no one since 8 a.m.Only two of the dead were recovered by the Coast Guard cutter Matagorda.
SPORTS
By ELLEN GAMERMAN and ELLEN GAMERMAN,SUN STAFF | April 22, 1998
In the wee hours of this morning, the boats in the Whitbread Round the World Race were expected to engage in an entirely new battle - a race within a race in the Chesapeake Bay.While the boats in this marathon around the globe have been jockeying for position aggressively since leaving Fort Lauderdale, Fla., on Sunday for this 870-nautical mile trek to Baltimore, the fluky conditions of the bay could make all their previous tactical moves irrelevant....
SPORTS
By GILBERT A. LEWTHWAITE and GILBERT A. LEWTHWAITE,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 11, 1998
SAO SEBASTIAO, Brazil - The next leg in the Whitbread Round the World Race is perhaps the trickiest. The winds can be tTC fickle, the Doldrums have to be crossed, and the north-flowing Gulf Stream must be negotiated before the 4,750 nautical miles to Fort Lauderdale, Fla., are finished.The secret of success in Leg 6, according to American Paul Cayard, skipper of overall leader EF Language of Sweden, will be to seize an early lead off the east coast of Brazil, be lucky in finding a path through the Doldrums, and be first to pick up the trade winds in the Caribbean.
SPORTS
January 6, 1998
Status: Day 1, Leg 4Standings:Boat, Nautical miles to finish1. Toshiba, 712.02. Swedish Match, 712.73. Merit Cup, 718.74. Silk Cut, 722.2hTC 5. Chessie Racing, 722.86. EF Language, 724.77. Innovation Kvaerner, 734.08. BrunelSunergy, 741.49. EF Education, 747.0 (as of 18: 02: 51 GMT)Boat beat: The American entry Toshiba, with Dennis Conner at the helm, took the lead today in the 1,270-nautical-mile fourth leg of the Whitbread Round the World yacht race from Sydney to Auckland, New Zealand.
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