Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFirst Album
IN THE NEWS

First Album

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan | April 28, 2002
On a cold night in Brooklyn, N.Y., this past December, members of the Baltimore band Ellen Cherry had just finished packing up the truck after recording their first album when they decided to nip back into the studio to say quick goodbyes. Just 20 minutes later, the group came back out to find the truck window broken and all the instruments stolen. "The cops told us, 'You're in New York City now; this isn't Baltimore,' " said Kristin Putchinski, Ellen Cherry singer / songwriter and a free-lance graphic artist.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
Rising country star Kip Moore could have recorded the follow-up to his 2012 debut album in Nashville's plushest studios, but the 33-year-old “Somethin' 'Bout a Truck” singer chose a bare-bones setting that literally had more roaches than luxuries. “No TV, no couches, no nothing in there,” Moore said on the phone last week from the road. “It helped play a mind trick on me, too. I like that feeling of being on edge and not being happy where I was.” The setup is contrived, but for Moore - who performs Friday at Patriot Center as apart of Lady Antebellum's Take Me Downtown Tour - it produced the results he desired.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | October 27, 1991
Back in 1989, when Mariah Carey was just another struggling singer hoping for the break that would earn her a recording contract, she knew almost nothing about the mechanics of the music industry. Release dates and advance orders were meaningless terms, and though she'd heard of platinum albums, she really didn't expect one of her own."Before I had a record deal, that was all that was on my mind: Get a deal," she says. "You don't realize what goes along with it. You just think, 'All I have to do is get a deal, and that's it. I'm in the clear.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2013
Get Arbouretum frontman Dave Heumann started on certain topics - such as maximizing the sound quality of vinyl, fictitious narrators in songwriting, photography - and expect long-winding exchanges full of ideas and anecdotes. But ask the 40-year-old Roland Park musician why he started playing music in the first place and the answer is uncharacteristically succinct. "You start a band and you get to play guitar solos for as long as you want," Heumann said from a corner of a coffeeshop late last month.
ENTERTAINMENT
By ALLIE SEMENZA | May 31, 2007
A power-pop quintet from Boston, the Click Five has enjoyed success on the Billboard Hot 100 Singles Chart with songs from its first album, Greetings From Imrie House, and has opened for Ashlee Simpson and the Backstreet Boys. Now, promoting its coming album, Modern Minds and Pastimes, the band will be making a stop in Baltimore tomorrow at Fletcher's Bar, 701 S. Bond St. Doors open at 7 p.m. tomorrow. Tickets are $10. Call 410-558-1889 or go to fletchers bar.com.
NEWS
December 17, 2007
DAN FOGELBERG, 56 Singer-songwriter Dan Fogelberg, the singer and songwriter whose hits "Leader of the Band" and "Same Old Lang Syne" helped define the soft-rock era, died of prostate cancer yesterday at his home in Maine. Mr. Fogelberg discovered he had advanced prostate cancer in 2004. His music was in the vein of fellow sensitive singer-songwriters James Taylor and Jackson Browne, and was powerful in its simplicity. He didn't rely on the volume of his voice to convey his emotions; instead, they came through in the soft, tender delivery and his poignant lyrics.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2012
Watch the video for Frankie Rose's "Gospel/Grace" above. When Brooklyn, N.Y.'s Frankie Rose - who plays Golden West Cafe on Saturday - released her first album, "Frankie Rose and the Outs," back in 2010, it fell in line with the reverb-heavy indie-pop she had made her old band, Vivian Girls. In February, less than two years after her first album, Rose returned with a second album and an updated sound. The appropriately titled "Interstellar," released in February, shimmers in space. These are still pop songs, just as they've always been, but there's a new, serious confidence to the execution.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Kickler Kelber | December 27, 2007
At 7 p.m. Sunday, the Lyric Opera House plays host to a concert by R&B stars Keith Sweat, Johnny Gill and Raheem DeVaughn. Last month, Sweat released a Christmas album, A Christmas of Love. Gill, who replaced Bobby Brown in the group New Edition, is best known for his ballads. And DeVaughn, a Beltsville native who attended Coppin State University, released his first album, The Love Experience, in 2005, and his song "Woman" was recently nominated for a best male R&B vocal performance Grammy Award.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | September 21, 2006
Hometown -- Takoma Park Current members --Billy Coulter, lead vocals and guitar; Tommy Derr, lead guitar and vocals; Doug Tull, drums; Barry Warsaw, bass and backing vocals Founded in --2003 Style --Americana, roots, power pop Influenced by --Ian Hunter, John Lennon, Bob Dylan, David Bowie, the Rolling Stones, Bruce Springsteen Notable --After a 20-year hiatus from music, the band released a warmly received self-titled album in late 2003. Though a new EP is in the works, Coulter still considers the first album a high point for himself and the band.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | November 5, 1997
She has sold more albums than the Spice Girls, spent more weeks on the pop charts than Jewel and has had as many hit videos as Alanis Morissette.But unless you're a country music fan, there's a very good chance that the name Shania Twain won't ring any bells. Even though the 32-year-old Canadian's last album, "The Woman In Me," has sold more than 9 million copies in the United States alone, she hasn't had much of a pop presence at all. Her videos aren't on MTV, her singles don't get played on Top-40 stations, and she has been almost entirely ignored by music magazines like Spin and Rolling Stone.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Zach Sparks, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2013
Last year was a big one for Baltimore alternative/new wave band the Perfects. Three music videos - two from their first album "Many Nights" and one from their new album "A Sudden Victory" - reached No. 1 on MTV's website. For lead singer and songwriter Ric Peters, it was reaffirming. Before the videos became popular, he wasn't sure if the Perfects would even record a second album. "It came about quickly," said Peters. "After the success we had with [the song] "Girls That Dance" and "Many Nights" on MTV, it made sense to repackage songs from that record, put some new material together and introduce the band to a new group of people.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2012
For the siblings of the Mississippi trio the Band Perry, there's always been something special about the fair. On "Walk Me Down the Middle," a love song from the group's 2010 self-titled album, lead singer Kimberly Perry instructs a boyfriend to "walk me by the Ferris wheel" to announce their relationship to the town. In the Band Perry's world, a fair is a rite of passage to be cherished. "Fairs have always resonated with the three of us," said youngest brother Neil, 22. "They've got this romantic feel to them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2012
Watch the video for Frankie Rose's "Gospel/Grace" above. When Brooklyn, N.Y.'s Frankie Rose - who plays Golden West Cafe on Saturday - released her first album, "Frankie Rose and the Outs," back in 2010, it fell in line with the reverb-heavy indie-pop she had made her old band, Vivian Girls. In February, less than two years after her first album, Rose returned with a second album and an updated sound. The appropriately titled "Interstellar," released in February, shimmers in space. These are still pop songs, just as they've always been, but there's a new, serious confidence to the execution.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | February 4, 2010
Clarence Copeland Greenwood isn't fond of labels. Critics have struggled to categorize his music. He's heard it described as everything from alternative rock to urban funk. "You've got to listen to it," said Greenwood, 41, who performs as Citizen Cope. "It's got certain sensibilities of American pop. It includes music forms of R&B to country and western. I have a lot of urban beats that infiltrate the music. I don't really like to categorize it." Greenwood, who grew up in Washington, performs two sold-out shows at the Recher Theatre in Towson tonight and Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison | March 5, 2009
Early on, Tricky established himself as a daring and original voice in pop and electronica. His 1995 debut, Maxinquaye, was a seething, dark musical brew of soul, hip-hop, reggae and punk that became an international smash. Six subsequent albums, including Nearly God, Pre-Millennium Tension and Angels With Dirty Faces, were explorative and expansive but didn't quite recapture the verve of his first album. After 2003's Vulnerable, Tricky took a five-year hiatus from recording. His latest CD - Knowle West Boy, released in July - is an energetic return to form, brilliant with genre-defying soundscapes.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 4, 2008
Largely by word of mouth, Flogging Molly has established a strong reputation as an explosive touring act. The 10-year-old independent Los Angeles septet - which is led by vocalist-songwriter Dave King and also features guitarist Dennis Casey, pianist and accordionist Matthew Hensley, bassist Nathan Maxwell, violinist Bridget Regan, mandolinist Robert Schmidt and drummer George Schwindt - uniquely fuses traditional Celtic instrumentation with thrashing punk...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | August 9, 2007
Indie rock duo Georgie James is looking to make a lasting career out of an unlikely musical partnership. Though the Washington-based band's debut album has yet to come out, singer/guitarist John Davis and pianist/singer Laura Burhenn are already working on new material for a follow-up. Starting this weekend, they set out on a string of dates opening for Ted Leo and the Pharmacists, including a Recher Theatre gig Saturday. A European tour will follow, and the acclaimed Saddle Creek Records releases their first album, Places, Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Kickler Kelber | December 27, 2007
At 7 p.m. Sunday, the Lyric Opera House plays host to a concert by R&B stars Keith Sweat, Johnny Gill and Raheem DeVaughn. Last month, Sweat released a Christmas album, A Christmas of Love. Gill, who replaced Bobby Brown in the group New Edition, is best known for his ballads. And DeVaughn, a Beltsville native who attended Coppin State University, released his first album, The Love Experience, in 2005, and his song "Woman" was recently nominated for a best male R&B vocal performance Grammy Award.
NEWS
December 17, 2007
DAN FOGELBERG, 56 Singer-songwriter Dan Fogelberg, the singer and songwriter whose hits "Leader of the Band" and "Same Old Lang Syne" helped define the soft-rock era, died of prostate cancer yesterday at his home in Maine. Mr. Fogelberg discovered he had advanced prostate cancer in 2004. His music was in the vein of fellow sensitive singer-songwriters James Taylor and Jackson Browne, and was powerful in its simplicity. He didn't rely on the volume of his voice to convey his emotions; instead, they came through in the soft, tender delivery and his poignant lyrics.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.