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By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2012
Researchers commissioned by the Defense Department said Monday that decades-old limits on lead exposure are inadequate to protect the health of workers on military firing ranges. Moreover, the National Academy of Science reported, lead from ammunition fired on Army, Navy and Air Force ranges in the last five years has "frequently exceeded" those limits, "in some cases by several orders of magnitude. " Sen. Ben Cardin expressed concern about the report's implications for workers at Maryland installations with firing ranges, such as Aberdeen Proving Ground in Harford County.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | January 30, 2014
Doug Varrieur likes to shoot. Problem is, it's 25 miles to the nearest range, where they charge $45 an hour. What's a gun enthusiast to do? Lucky for him, Mr. Varrieur lives in Florida. Problem solved. Just erect a makeshift range in the back yard and fire away. It's perfectly legal. Re-read that if you want. It's just as nutty the second time around. In a story by my colleague Cammy Clark that appeared in Sunday's Miami Herald, we learn that Mr. Varrieur, who lives on Big Pine Key, once complained to a gun-shop owner about what a pain it was going to the range to shoot.
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NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,Sun Staff Writer | November 18, 1994
A Baltimore County Circuit judge and jury huddled in the sprinkling rain yesterday at the county police firing range watching a ballistics expert pull the trigger of a semi-automatic pistol that pumped 11 bullets into a man last April allegedly on one trigger pull.Each time, a single bullet cracked into the air followed by a long silence.Ventura McLee hoped to hear the sound of more bullets spewing out of the pistol.It would have supported his testimony that when he shot Rohan Lawson Harvey, he had pulled the trigger only once and the bullets came out as they would from a machine gun.Mr.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2012
Researchers commissioned by the Defense Department said Monday that decades-old limits on lead exposure are inadequate to protect the health of workers on military firing ranges. Moreover, the National Academy of Science reported, lead from ammunition fired on Army, Navy and Air Force ranges in the last five years has "frequently exceeded" those limits, "in some cases by several orders of magnitude. " Sen. Ben Cardin expressed concern about the report's implications for workers at Maryland installations with firing ranges, such as Aberdeen Proving Ground in Harford County.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | August 16, 1992
The county police team that takes over the assets of drug dealers wants more than $122,000 to refurbish the police firing range it uses for training and to hire two private investigators to work with the state's attorney's office.The County Council has scheduled a public hearing on the supplemental budget request, funneled through County Executive Robert R. Neall, at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow in the Arundel Center.The firing range at the police academy in Davidsonville, where the Forfeiture and Asset Seizure Team trains, was slated for an overhaul in the capital budget, but the request was not approved, said County Budget Officer Steven E. Welkos.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | January 29, 1993
Proposals for new fire stations in Ridgeway and on Forest Drive near Annapolis received preliminary approval from the Anne Arundel County Planning Advisory Board yesterday, but a police request for an indoor firing range was turned down.The board, which makes recommendations on capital projects to County Executive Robert R. Neall, heard presentations from the two public safety departments. The approvals came in the form of straw votes, meaning things could change before a recommendation is sent to Mr. Neall.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1996
The County Commissioners voted to spend an additional $12,000 on the county's new firing range yesterday in an attempt to muffle the noise of gunfire bothering residents in a nearby subdivision.The range, deep in the Northern Landfill off Route 140 north of Reese Road, is shielded on the right by a steep hill and on the left by sound panels and woods. But it is open at the rear.And five days a week, from 10 a.m. to an hour before sundown, the sounds of rifle and pistol fire travel across the open landfill through a valley and up a hillside to the Tannery Manor subdivision off Naugahyde Road.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 25, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Protesters who have shut down the Navy's live bombing range in Puerto Rico for the past year could be removed next week by federal marshals supported by Coast Guard vessels and Marines aboard Navy ships, U.S. officials said yesterday. Federal officials have finalized a plan to remove scores of protesters who have been camped on the island of Vieques since last April, when two 500-pound bombs from a Marine F-18 jet went astray, killing a Puerto Rican security guard and wounding four others.
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,SUN STAFF | January 31, 1996
Hoping to be a better neighbor and give its officers a more modern place to practice, the county Police Department is asking for nearly $1 million to build an enclosed firing range at its Davidsonville training academy.Department administrators are expected to make their request tomorrow during a capital budget presentation to the Planning Advisory Board.Officials would not discuss the proposed $926,000 firing range, but documents submitted with the request by Police Chief Robert A. Beck call for a partially enclosed 19,000- to 25,000-square foot structure.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | January 30, 2014
Doug Varrieur likes to shoot. Problem is, it's 25 miles to the nearest range, where they charge $45 an hour. What's a gun enthusiast to do? Lucky for him, Mr. Varrieur lives in Florida. Problem solved. Just erect a makeshift range in the back yard and fire away. It's perfectly legal. Re-read that if you want. It's just as nutty the second time around. In a story by my colleague Cammy Clark that appeared in Sunday's Miami Herald, we learn that Mr. Varrieur, who lives on Big Pine Key, once complained to a gun-shop owner about what a pain it was going to the range to shoot.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2011
The condos at the Ritz-Carlton Residences offer "luxurious waterfront living" — with breathtaking views of Baltimore's Inner Harbor and amenities that include marble baths, landscaped terraces and butler's pantries with access for the help. But that's not enough for one resident. An architect has been talking to city officials about permits that might be needed to build a gun range in one of the penthouse-level condos on Key Highway, at the foot of Federal Hill. Inquiries about the gun range were meant to be hush-hush, but word about the unusual request got out quickly.
NEWS
By Luciana Lopez and Luciana Lopez,SUN STAFF | June 25, 2003
The Harford County Sheriff's Office dedicated its firing range yesterday, with community leaders firing ceremonial shots that officially opened the expanded, environmentally friendly facility. "I can't tell you how long this agency has been thinking about a facility such as this," said Sheriff R. Thomas Golding, who was sworn in to his post Monday. "It's a priority for the citizens, when a police officer is called to use extreme force, to know [the officer] is well-trained," said County Executive James M. Harkins, who fired an opening shot.
NEWS
June 22, 2003
Physicians honor Aberdeen doctor Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. was the keynote speaker at last week's Maryland Academy of Family Physicians conference in Annapolis. Besides its four-day scientific program and trade show, the group honored its departing president, Dr. Ben E. Oteyza of Bel Air, and presented the organization's Lifetime Achievement Award to Dr. Rose Mary Hatem Bonsack of Aberdeen. With headquarters in Baltimore County, the group is the largest medical specialty society in Maryland.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2001
After discovering possible contamination of tests to determine whether a suspect could have fired a gun, the Baltimore Police Department has changed its test policy and warned prosecutors that some of their cases could contain faulty evidence. The city state's attorney's office said this week that it has known of the problem with gunshot residue tests since late July but has not alerted all defense attorneys - notification the city public defender's office says should have come long ago. Neither the police, prosecutors nor defense attorneys know how many criminal cases have been affected by potential contamination, although they say the number is probably small.
NEWS
June 16, 2001
PROBABLY NO one thought George W. Bush's election as president would doom the U.S. Navy's use of Vieques Island for target practice. The military, most Republicans and Puerto Rican demonstrators expected the opposite. President Bush's decision that the Navy go elsewhere within two years is cheering to many Puerto Rican citizens of the United States who found the bombardment of the island a relic of colonialism. It is welcome to the fewer than 10,000 persons, many of them fishermen, many of them hearing-impaired from years of bombardment, who live on Vieques, which is east of Puerto Rico but within the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2000
Problems with the rifle range are not the only ones at Maryland's new $4.6 million police firearms training center in Sykesville, where more fingers have been pointed than shots fired. The state and the contractor at the center, EnviroServe Inc. of Sykesville, are in a dispute over who is responsible for what EnviroServe claims are $2.4 million in cost overruns, most of them associated with four pistol ranges. The state's Department of General Services (DGS), which oversaw construction of the firearms training center, says EnviroServe worked too slowly.
NEWS
May 4, 2000
THE VIEQUES problem was solved in January. The Vieques crisis is something else -- real, unnecessary and irrelevant -- brought to a head by steely determination on both sides to have a showdown. The Jan. 31 agreement between President Clinton and Gov. Pedro J. Rossello of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico provides for a referendum of the 9,300 residents of Vieques on whether the eastern half of the small island may remain in use as a firing range for the U.S. Navy. There is an aid incentive to vote yes, but a likelihood the majority will vote no. If so, the Navy must clean up its range and end training by May 2003.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 19, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Citing "serious concerns" from Puerto Rico, Defense Secretary William S. Cohen has delayed his recommendation to President Clinton on the fate of a 58-year-old Navy firing range there, even though a presidential panel concluded yesterday that the range should continue operating for five more years.Cohen asserted that U.S. forces must be kept "well-trained and ready." But he said there should be more discussions with officials on Puerto Rico and Vieques Island, which the Navy and Marines have long used as a live-fire range.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2000
Problems with the rifle range are not the only ones at Maryland's new $4.6 million police firearms training center in Sykesville, where more fingers have been pointed than shots fired. The state and the contractor at the center, EnviroServe Inc. of Sykesville, are in a dispute over who is responsible for what EnviroServe claims are $2.4 million in cost overruns, most of them associated with four pistol ranges. The state's Department of General Services (DGS), which oversaw construction of the firearms training center, says EnviroServe worked too slowly.
NEWS
May 4, 2000
THE VIEQUES problem was solved in January. The Vieques crisis is something else -- real, unnecessary and irrelevant -- brought to a head by steely determination on both sides to have a showdown. The Jan. 31 agreement between President Clinton and Gov. Pedro J. Rossello of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico provides for a referendum of the 9,300 residents of Vieques on whether the eastern half of the small island may remain in use as a firing range for the U.S. Navy. There is an aid incentive to vote yes, but a likelihood the majority will vote no. If so, the Navy must clean up its range and end training by May 2003.
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