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Firestorm

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NEWS
April 12, 1993
"The regulation ignited a firestorm of public anger against United Way . . ." -- news story, The Sun, March 30."The original rezoning plan touched off a firestorm of protests . . ." -- news story, The Sun, March 18."In recent weeks, a firestorm of criticism has surrounded NBC . . ." -- column, The Sun, March 3."Arnick has walked himself into a firestorm of outrage . . ." -- column, The Sun, Feb. 16."School rezoning proposal, which set off a firestorm of public criticism." -- news story, The Sun, Feb. 7."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice was trending on Twitter Wednesday afternoon for all the wrong reasons. In an eight-hour period, Rice's image suffered severe damage -- the kind from which it might never recover. It was the result of two devastating media developments. It started with TMZ releasing video from an Atlantic City casino early in the day, and was followed by publication of a summons saying that Rice hit his fiancee with his hand "rendering her unconscious" at the casino Saturday night.
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NEWS
By Patricia Meisol | November 11, 1990
The events that have turned Frostburg State University upside down the last two weeks began when a $200 campaign contribution to state Delegate Casper R. Taylor Jr., D-Allegany, from the Frostburg State University Foundation appeared in a list published by the Cumberland Times-News last August.An exchange of letters between the foundation and Mr. Taylor followed, including an assurance to the university from him that the money was used for charitable causes.Two months later, copies of the letters found their way to a reporter.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2012
Progressive Insurance has reached a settlement with the family of Kaitlynn Fisher, days after her brother's online rant against the company unleashed a torrent of backlash on social media. Fisher's family will receive a payment in the "tens of thousands," according to its attorney, Allen W. Cohen of Annapolis. "It's exactly how much we asked for," he said. The settlement prevents Cohen from filing a complaint with the Maryland Insurance Commissioner, he said, and the payment is separate from the judgment rendered by a jury in Baltimore Circuit Court last week awarding the Fishers $760,000.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 10, 2003
PESHTIGO, Wisconsin - Every school boy and girl knows the tale of how Mrs. O'Leary's cow kicked over a lantern in a Chicago barn, igniting one of the most famous fires in American history. But few outside Wisconsin, it seems, are familiar with the story of another, more horrific fire that occurred on the same warm autumn night in October 1871. While Chicago's business district burned, a firestorm raged in the northern Wisconsin woods, killing eight times as many people and destroying 2,400 square miles - about 1.5 million acres of woods, farms and villages, including the booming lumbering town of Peshtigo, just northwest of Green Bay. The area that burned was twice the size of Rhode Island.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 9, 1998
Fires are bad. Fires are even worse when they're started by people who smoke cigarettes.Firefighters are good. Firefighters are especially good when they're called "smokejumpers," which means they parachute into the scariest fires of all and put them out. Sometimes they even save little girls and their dogs. They say things like, "It's something I gotta do" before they jump. -Smokejumpers are macho!"Firestorm" is a movie that stars Howie Long as the bravest of all smokejumpers. Howie Long was a defensive lineman for the Oakland/Los Angeles Raiders for 13 years.
NEWS
April 7, 1998
Dr. Viola Wertheim Bernard,91, a prominent psychiatrist who specialized in helping adopted and foster children, died March 21 in New York. Dr. Bernard founded Columbia University's Division of Community and Social Psychiatry and directed the division from 1956 to 1969.Marshall Fredericks,90, who crafted huge public sculptures across the United States and Europe, died Saturday in Royal Oak, Mich. He created Cleveland's 46-foot war memorial, "Fountain of Eternal Life," featuring a male figure soaring from a fountain.
NEWS
By ANDREW LAM | October 27, 1991
San Francisco. -- Afriend from the East Coast called to inquire about the latest disaster to hit the Bay Area -- the fire in the Oakland hills. I painted a firestorm of cataclysmic proportions: a smoke-veiled sun that turned the sea the color of blood; inhabitants fleeing from balls of fire; ashes raining down from the sky."Man, California living must be over-rated," my friend exclaimed.We Californians live now, as Joan Didion would put it, "close to the edge," beset with reminders of how transient life can be: the mudslide of '82 that sent houses down slopes to meet highways; the earthquake of '89 that set glass and concrete a-tumbling; now the firestorm of '91, fed by Santa Ana-like winds, that left burnt-out hot tubs, charred sports cars, lonely chimneys.
NEWS
By William Safire | October 8, 1991
OBSERVE THE stutter-step of political scandal.First, troubling news breaks. The charges are brushed aside as trivial by late-waking media or are stonewalled into silence by grim-faced authorities.Then scandal coverage develops a second wind, whipping up a firestorm that sucks in coverage down to the talk-show level, which sets in motion investigations that bring reform to the political process and sweep out rascals.Finally, the scandalmongers are derogated by historians as making much fuss over nothing.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | October 18, 1994
OAKLAND, Calif. -- The other morning, Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein stood outside a home only now being rebuilt after the devastation of the bay area's 1991 firestorms. A neighborhood resident, Margey Gibson Haskell, shook her hand and told her: "If this is a special interest, I'm awfully glad to be one."The woman's remark came in response to Mrs. Feinstein's recounting to a small group of firestorm victims how she had pushed through legislation in 1993 that enabled them to overcome bureaucratic roadblocks.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec | March 26, 2012
The Ravens are expected to be relatively quiet at this week's owners meetings at the posh Breakers hotel in Palm Beach, Fla., and that's almost certainly a good thing. That's because these meetings will be dominated by talk of the fallout of Bountygate with the New Orleans Saints, along with continued dialogue about the salary cap penalities leveled against the Washington Redskins and Dallas Cowboys. I arrived at the media room about 45 minutes ago and there is already a full-fledged media stakeout outside awaiting the arrival of Saints coach Sean Payton and general manager Mickey Loomis.
HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington | kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | November 21, 2009
Mary Ivey didn't have a family history of breast cancer or a genetic mutation putting her at high risk for the disease. At 37, she was too young for an annual mammogram. But one day in March, she did a routine self-exam, as her doctor had instructed her, just in case. She found a marble-sized lump in her left breast. It was cancer. Now, Ivey bristles at a federal panel's new guidelines that say women shouldn't bother formally examining their breasts because the self-exam - emphasized as a key health tool for so many years - shows no evidence of saving lives.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and Matthew Hay Brown and David Nitkin and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporters | July 3, 2007
WASHINGTON -- In a move that even Republicans said would spark a firestorm, President Bush spared I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby Jr. from prison yesterday, calling the former White House aide's 2 1/2 -year sentence for lying during a federal investigation into the leak of a CIA agent's identity "excessive." By commuting Libby's prison term, Bush risked political backlash in showing leniency to a man who had loyally served his administration as Vice President Dick Cheney's top aide. Respected for his intellect and reasoned demeanor, Libby is widely viewed as an architect of U.S. policy toward Iraq, and his conviction was interpreted by administration critics as a slap at how the White House misused intelligence leading up to the Iraq invasion.
NEWS
By Paul Moore and Paul Moore,Public Editor | May 20, 2007
Significantly more readers are now visiting The Sun's Web site due to a flood of morning news and photo postings from The Sun's newsroom, plus an array of blog postings on topics from sports and dining out to the environment and education. By committing more newsroom resources to online reporting and editing, The Sun is seeking to build its audience - and is seeking new sources of revenue in the highly competitive media market. In that regard, the rise in The Sun's Web site traffic is very good news.
NEWS
By Carol J. Williams and Carol J. Williams,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 20, 2007
Miami -- A militant Cuban exile wanted in Venezuela in connection with the 1976 bombing of a Cuban airliner was released from a New Mexico jail yesterday and allowed to return to his home in Miami to await trial on charges of violating immigration law. The Bush administration's inability to keep former CIA operative Luis Posada Carriles locked up incited broad condemnation throughout Latin America and among critics of U.S.-Cuba policy. It also provoked accusations that the White House maintains a double standard on terrorism, punishing those who strike at the United States while giving shelter to a man who has admitted to deadly violence against his Communist-ruled homeland.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 3, 2004
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's latest program celebrates the art of the unexpected. It also provides one of the season's greatest highs so far. Just about everything Charles Ives wrote defied the expectations of his day, and there's plenty of defiance left, decades after his death. No one expected a disgruntled, 84-year-old Richard Strauss to produce an impossibly radiant farewell a year before he died, let alone some of the most transcendent sounds in all of music. And the folks who cheered the Fifth Symphony by Shostakovich when it was introduced in 1937 sure weren't figuring on the convention-bending ideas he had for his Sixth two years later.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 3, 2004
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's latest program celebrates the art of the unexpected. It also provides one of the season's greatest highs so far. Just about everything Charles Ives wrote defied the expectations of his day, and there's plenty of defiance left, decades after his death. No one expected a disgruntled, 84-year-old Richard Strauss to produce an impossibly radiant farewell a year before he died, let alone some of the most transcendent sounds in all of music. And the folks who cheered the Fifth Symphony by Shostakovich when it was introduced in 1937 sure weren't figuring on the convention-bending ideas he had for his Sixth two years later.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 26, 1991
News reports that Saddam Hussein had squirreled away billions of dollars in bank accounts around the world reverberated through business and diplomatic communities yesterday.The U.S. Treasury Department was besieged with questions about how much of the Iraqi president's assets were, in fact, hidden in such accounts, where they were and what would be done about them.The Jordanian central bank insisted it had not sheltered Mr. Hussein's money.The European publishing company Hachette SA denied having any knowledge of the Iraqi government as a stockholder.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 10, 2003
PESHTIGO, Wisconsin - Every school boy and girl knows the tale of how Mrs. O'Leary's cow kicked over a lantern in a Chicago barn, igniting one of the most famous fires in American history. But few outside Wisconsin, it seems, are familiar with the story of another, more horrific fire that occurred on the same warm autumn night in October 1871. While Chicago's business district burned, a firestorm raged in the northern Wisconsin woods, killing eight times as many people and destroying 2,400 square miles - about 1.5 million acres of woods, farms and villages, including the booming lumbering town of Peshtigo, just northwest of Green Bay. The area that burned was twice the size of Rhode Island.
FEATURES
By Greg Braxton and Anne Valdespino and Greg Braxton and Anne Valdespino,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 3, 2002
HOLLYWOOD - A tearful, overwhelmed Halle Berry declared, "This moment is so much bigger than me" when she became the first black woman to win a best actress Oscar. The triumph was not hers alone, she said, but belonged to past and current black actresses who have struggled in Hollywood. More than three months later, Berry's words still ring true - but in a way she likely did not anticipate. Caustic remarks by Angela Bassett in the July 1 issue of Newsweek, in which she criticizes the sexual nature of Berry's Oscar-winning role in Monster's Ball while subtly questioning Berry's choice in taking on the part, has reignited a fierce debate inside and outside the black entertainment community about Berry and the bittersweet significance of her victory.
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