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NEWS
August 25, 2013
Baltimore County has reached agreements that extend contracts through June 30, 2016 for chief officers of the fire department as well as county supervisory, management and confidential employees, officials said. The agreements provide 3 percent bonuses in November 2014 for all employees on the payroll as of Oct. 1, 2014; and 3 percent cost of living allowances for employees in supervisory, management and confidential and chief officers units on July 1, 2015. The pact also guarantees step and longevity increases with no layoffs or furloughs for all employees in those groups through June 30, 2016.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2013
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and her pick to run the city Fire Department said Monday they hope to hire and promote more minorities and women - even as the department cuts positions. In introducing Niles Ford, 48, as her selection to lead the Baltimore City Fire Department, Rawlings-Blake called a lack of diversity in the agency a "persistent problem. " She pointed to Ford's work as fire chief in Lincoln, Neb., where he created a plan to hire more minorities and women. "Dr. Ford was also a leader in opening the door for women and minorities in Lincoln, promoting the first female battalion chief in their history," Rawlings-Blake said.
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NEWS
By Roger Twigg and Roger Twigg,Staff Writer | May 19, 1993
Baltimore Fire Chief Herman Williams Jr. said yesterday tha no high-ranking fire officers will lose their jobs under a major reorganization.Under the reorganization, the eight deputy chief positions will be eliminated and four assistant chief positions will be created.Although the deputy chiefs, all with 22 to 40 years of experience, were notified Friday that they would be laid off effective June 30, retirements and reassignments will eliminate the need for layoffs, Chief Williams said.He said three of the deputy chiefs -- Joseph Spadaro, William Hunt and Henry Fowlkes -- have already indicated they will retire.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2013
A former Howard County fire officer is suing in federal court to get his job back, alleging that the county violated his rights by firing him for personal Facebook discussions about gun control, free speech and "liberal" politics. Former Battalion Chief Kevin P. Buker, who worked for the Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue Services from 1997 until he was let go in March, contends that the county violated his First Amendment rights by prohibiting speech on public issues that did not interfere with his job performance.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | May 6, 1998
City administrators and union officials spent yesterday countering criticism that the city has too many workers.Officials from the city Health Department and fire officers union didn't quarrel with the figures in the report issued Monday by Calvert Institute of Policy Research Inc., but said that the study fails to take the city's special needs into account.The study compared the number of Baltimore government workers with six other industrial cities. It found that Baltimore had 5,500 more workers than the other six cities studied -- Cleveland, Indianapolis, Milwaukee, Philadelphia, Richmond, Va., and St. Louis.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2005
Baltimore's Board of Estimates approved a $30,000 settlement yesterday in a long-running age-discrimination lawsuit by a former Fire Department battalion chief. Andrew P. Shows, now retired, sued the city after being forced to leave his position in 1999 because of health reasons. Shows, who was 67 at the time and suffering from congestive heart disease, argued that he was physically able to perform the duties of battalion chief because he would be directing firefighting rather than entering burning buildings.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,sun reporter | February 14, 2007
The Baltimore Fire Department suspended without pay yesterday the head of the training academy and the lead instructor who oversaw a "live burn" exercise in a vacant city rowhouse that ended with a cadet's death and injuries to two other firefighters. In a statement, the department also conceded that the training fire Friday failed to meet standards of the National Fire Protection Association, which city fire officials observe. Officials declined to elaborate on the shortcomings uncovered in the preliminary investigation into the death of Racheal M. Wilson.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2001
The second of Baltimore's two fire unions overwhelmingly approved last night a two-year contract that will give members a 7 percent pay raise this year - equal to what city police have received, which has been a yearlong goal of the city's 1,600 firefighters. The contract, however, does not maintain pay parity in the second year, which begins July 1. Police will receive 8 percent next year, while firefighters and fire officers will receive raises ranging from 3.5 percent to 6 percent. Yesterday's 825-91 vote by Baltimore Firefighters Local 734 puts to rest a yearlong battle between firefighters and Mayor Martin O'Malley's administration, which had tried to prevent firefighters from keeping pay parity with police officers.
NEWS
September 25, 2012
The Sun editorial ("In defeat, a victory," Sept. 24) claims that the City of Baltimore was within its rights to make unilateral changes to fire and police pensions. Federal Judge Marvin Garbis ruled that the city ordinance was unconstitutional. It appears that the editorial board at the Sun believes contracts are made to be broken. In 2009, the fire officers, fire fighters and the Fraternal Order of Police approached the city administration with a proposal that would have saved Baltimore over $80 million in pension costs.
NEWS
April 29, 2004
The Union Bridge Volunteer Fire Company has announced its 2004 officers. Administrative officers are Thomas Garber, president; Edgar Wentz, vice president; Linda Bostian, secretary; Mike Kreimer, treasurer; Daniel Cartzendafner, assistant treasurer; Barbara Warehime, recording secretary; and the Rev. Richard Michael, chaplain. Executive board members are Rick Etzler, Jim Harris, Jim Sinnott and David Nelson. Trustees are Richard Gesell, Charles Haines, John Keeney, Rick Wetzel and Jay Anderson.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2013
Baltimore police do not have to reinstate an officer who was fired after the department discovered she was married to an incarcerated Dead Man Inc. gang member, an appeals court has ruled. The Court of Special Appeals on Tuesday upheld a decision by Baltimore police to terminate Meredith Cross, who argued that her constitutional rights were violated when she was fired from the department because she married Carlito Cabana –– a convicted murderer and a member of the Dead Man Inc. prison gang.
NEWS
August 25, 2013
Baltimore County has reached agreements that extend contracts through June 30, 2016 for chief officers of the fire department as well as county supervisory, management and confidential employees, officials said. The agreements provide 3 percent bonuses in November 2014 for all employees on the payroll as of Oct. 1, 2014; and 3 percent cost of living allowances for employees in supervisory, management and confidential and chief officers units on July 1, 2015. The pact also guarantees step and longevity increases with no layoffs or furloughs for all employees in those groups through June 30, 2016.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | November 5, 2012
A 69-year-old Edgewood man, who told investigators he was trying to rid his home of "evil spirits," has been charged with arson in connection with a fire at the dwelling last month. William E. Lowry was served with warrants at the Harford County Detention Center on Thursday charging him with first-degree and second-degree arson in connection with the Oct. 11 fire, according to the Maryland State Fire Marshal's Office. "The investigation by deputy state fire marshals revealed the owner of the property, William E. Lowry, 69, was responsible for intentionally setting the fire on an enclosed deck connected to the home," the Fire Marshal's Office said in a news release announcing the charges.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2012
A man was shot in the arm and upper body by a Baltimore police officer in the 3000 block of Spaulding Ave. in Northwest Baltimore on Tuesday night after firing at the officer while trying to flee the scene of earlier gunfire, according to police. The man, who was not immediately identified, was listed in serious but stable condition at an area hospital late Tuesday, police said. His injuries were not considered life-threatening. Officers with the Violent Crime Impact Section, which routinely patrols that area near Pimlico Race Course , responded to the scene about 9 p.m. after hearing gunfire, said Anthony Guglielmi, a police spokesman.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2012
A lieutenant with the Baltimore Fire Department who was badly burned during an early-morning fire in East Baltimore on Oct. 11 has recovered enough to be taken off of a ventilator but still has a long way to go in his recovery, according to a union official. "He was able to talk to me. We were able to have a conversation," Michael Campbell, president of the fire officers union, said of his recent visit with the officer at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. "He was still somewhat sedated.
NEWS
September 25, 2012
The Sun editorial ("In defeat, a victory," Sept. 24) claims that the City of Baltimore was within its rights to make unilateral changes to fire and police pensions. Federal Judge Marvin Garbis ruled that the city ordinance was unconstitutional. It appears that the editorial board at the Sun believes contracts are made to be broken. In 2009, the fire officers, fire fighters and the Fraternal Order of Police approached the city administration with a proposal that would have saved Baltimore over $80 million in pension costs.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | March 8, 1998
The city firefighter unions have rejected an offer that would have given them a contract without a raise, prompting both sides to head for arbitration.Ninety-five percent of the 400 union members who cast votes Friday rejected the city's contract offer, which included a 2 percent Christmas bonus. The unions are seeking a 3.5 percent raise.Capt. Stephen G. Fugate, president of the Baltimore Fire Officers Union Local 964, said yesterday that he thought it was "very cynical" for the city to offer one-time holiday bonuses instead of salary increases.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | July 31, 1995
Three more unions have made endorsements in Baltimore's mayoral election. The city firefighters and fire officers are backing City Council President Mary Pat Clarke, and private health care workers are supporting Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke.The endorsement of Mrs. Clarke by Baltimore Fire Fighters Local 734 and Fire Officers Local 964 gives the two-term council president a sweep of the city's public safety unions. Last week, the police union announced its support of Mrs. Clarke, who is challenging Mr. Schmoke's bid for a third term in the Sept.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2012
One of three Baltimore fire companies slated for closure will remain open until October, the fire unions said Friday. Baltimore firefighters union president Rick Hoffman said he received a message from Fire Chief James Clack, alerting him that West Baltimore's Truck 10 will not close until Oct. 1. "That will give the city more time to evaluate," Hoffman said of the postponement. Hoffman said he believes the delay will give Clack more time to evaluate a proposal from City Councilman William "Pete" Welch to place advertisements on the side of firetrucks to raise money.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2012
Baltimore Fire Chief James Clack explained in detail a plan to save money by permanently closing three fire companies during a City Council public safety committee hearing Wednesday. Clack said the plan, outlined as part of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's pending budget, won't close any stations or cause layoffs and will help the department regroup after years of rotating closures, which he called a short-term solution to a long-term budget problem. A smaller force, shrunk through unfilled vacancies and retirements but still able to respond across the city, will save the city money in turn, he said.
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