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NEWS
April 11, 1995
Starting at 9 a.m. tomorrow Hampstead residents may notice discoloration in their water when the town's water department personnel begin to flush fire hydrants.Officials recommend that residents reserve enough water for their early morning routines before retiring tomorrow night. They also should run faucets Thursday morning until clear water is received.Residents should refrain from doing laundry Thursday.Although the water will be discolored, town officials said it is fully treated and potable.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
Baltimore City firefighters were called to two fires Thursday morning amid the snow storm, but a spokesman said call volumes were lower than usual. Firefighters were called to the 1200 block of North Decker Avenue and the 2600 block of Greenmount Avenue, where firefighters had some difficulty getting into the house because snow blocked the doors, said fire spokesman Ian Brennan. "We haven't had any reports of anything freezing," he said, referring to fire hydrants. He said residents — in addition to sidewalks — should clear areas around fire hydrants to make them accessible in case of a fire.
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NEWS
October 5, 1998
Hampstead's Water Department will begin systematically flushing all fire hydrants about 9 p.m. Wednesday.Residents are advised to draw enough water that evening for morning consumption.The average house system contains less than 100 gallons of water.It also would be advisable to refrain from doing laundry through Thursday.Water might be discolored during flushing hours and into Thursday, but is fully treated and potable.Information: Neil Ridgely, 410-239-7408.Around townRec council meets: Charles Carroll Recreation Council will meet at 7: 30 p.m. today at Charles Carroll Elementary School, 3719 Littlestown Pike.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2014
Three firefighters and two residents were injured in a 2-alarm fire in a row house in Locust Point Tuesday afternoon, the fire department said. All five were taken to area hospitals with non-life-threatening injuries. One of the firefighters was hurt in a fall through a floor that collapsed, and one of the civilians and another of the firefighters had burn injuries, department spokesman Ian Brennan said. Firefighters responded to the blaze in the 1400 block of Cooksie St. around 2 p.m. and brought it under control in around 45 minutes, Brennan said.
NEWS
April 3, 2005
The Harford County Public Works Department's Water and Sewer Division will begin its biannual flushing of fire hydrants tomorrow. Flushing will take place between 7 a.m. and 10 p.m. daily. Division officials say they expect the operation to be complete June 30. About 4,000 hydrants are involved.
NEWS
April 24, 1998
The Westminster Department of Public Works will conduct its annual flushing of fire hydrants from 8 p.m. to midnight Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday.Areas that will be affected are Carroll Meadows, Eden Farms and Devlin Square, Sullivan Heights, Hahn Road, Cranberry Road, Cranberry Mall and Cranberry Square.Flushing will cause some discoloration of water, and residents should not do laundry the next day. Faucets should be opened first thing in the morning and allowed to run until water is clear.
NEWS
October 18, 1993
The Carroll County Bureau of Utilities will begin flushing fire hydrants in the Eldersburg area today.The flushing, which clears the filtration system of sediment that has accumulated in the bottom of lines, will continue through Oct. 29.Residents should not experience any loss of water pressure, county officials said, but tap water may be temporarily discolored. The water is safe to drink and can be used for washing, the officials said.% Information: 857-2164
NEWS
By William Jay and William Jay,Contributing Writer | May 27, 1994
Yesterday marked the kickoff for Baltimore's "Save Our Water Fire Protection Campaign," an effort by the city to minimize a common summer problem: the unauthorized opening of fire hydrants.The campaign was organized by the city's fire and public works departments. Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, Fire Chief Herman Williams Jr., and Public Works Director George G. Balog attended a kickoff demonstration yesterday outside a city building in the 1000 block of W. Saratoga St.A fire hydrant produces a stream of water that can cause serious injuries, said Battalion Chief Hector Torres, a Fire Department spokesman.
NEWS
April 5, 1996
The city of Westminster's Department of Public Works, Utility Maintenance Department, will flush fire hydrants from 8 p.m. to midnight Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday.Affected areas will be the West Main Street area, including Pennsylvania Avenue, Ward, Hersh, Monroe streets, Kemper and Milton Avenue avenues, Carroll and John streets, and the Westminster and Carroll Plaza shopping centers.Also, Union Street, Sullivan Avenue, Autumn Ridge Court and School House Avenue areas will be flushed.The flushing will cause some water discoloration and residents are advised not to do laundry the day afterward.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 10, 1999
THEY ARRIVE BY caravan -- four men, a truck pulling two trailers, plus an extra car or two."I thought there was a problem with the water main," said a curious neighbor attracted by the unusual entourage.Despite the "ET" suits and hooded face masks, the workers weren't plumbers or space travelers. They're specialized painters from K & K Painting and Contracting of Baltimore, and their job is to strip and repaint fire hydrants.Each crew is equipped with a blast machine, air purifier, dust collector, vacuum and paint.
NEWS
July 9, 2013
The Sun's recent headlines about rising gambling revenues neglect to note the fact that the companies' profits, or course, represent money lost by the players ("Casino take soars in June," July 6). Add this to the increases in the gasoline tax and bridge and highway tolls, and one would think that the state of Maryland and Baltimore would have no more need of additional taxes. Dream on. What if it doesn't rain? No runoff taxes. What happens if we drink less water? Headline: "Water tax collection drops - people breaking into fire hydrants.
NEWS
June 2, 2013
Fire departments from Baltimore and Harford counties responded to a house fire Saturday evening in the Kingsville area. According to the Joppa-Magnolia Volunteer Fire Company, the call came at about 6:44 p.m. regarding a fire in the 11500 block of Sherwood Road, Kingsville. Due to a lack of fire hydrants in the area, additional fire engines with large volumes of water were requested, according to JMVFC. Firefighters used chain saws to cut the roof open, allowing the smoke and heat to escape, while personnel also searched the home for occupants, but none were found.
TRAVEL
By Brooks Welsh, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2012
Everybody likes to look their best on the beach right? Of course we all do, especially when you're bronzing up in the summer sun. Well, maybe you aren't at the shore for long, maybe just a weekend or a few days, but you should considering taking advantage of different workout opportunities the beach provides. No gym membership needed for this style of workout, the beach itself is your gym. For those looking for a nice wake up to the day try a nice walk along the shore. It's a great way to get the day started and force yourself to get on the beach early.
NEWS
By Anica Butler | anica.butler@baltsun.com | April 1, 2010
A tanker truck making a delivery to an Annapolis gas station started leaking fuel after hitting a fire hydrant Wednesday. The incident happened around 9:30 p.m., according to Capt. Kelly Martin, a spokeswoman for the Annapolis Fire Department. An Eastern Petroleum truck was making a delivery to the Exxon station at West Street and Lafayette Avenue when the truck clipped a fire hydrant. The collision damaged a line to the truck, causing fuel to leak. The truck was carrying 8,500 gallons of gasoline, but the leaking tank was holding only 2,500 gallons.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | liz.kay@baltsun.com | February 21, 2010
The problem: The sidewalks by a Riverside fire station go unshoveled. The backstory: More than a week has passed since two back-to-back storms crippled Baltimore. The news during and after the snowstorms was filled with city officials' pleas to residents and businesses, imploring them to assist with the cleanup by shoveling snow off sidewalks, and from storm drains and fire hydrants. One might ask whether some of the departments should also be doing their part.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, Jacques Kelly and Liz Bowie and Baltimore Sun reporters | February 7, 2010
Digging out of the great snow of February 2010 is going to take a while, county and city officials said on Sunday, and freeing every neighborhood may take some shoveling from residents. Most main roads are now in good shape, transportation officials say, but smaller, secondary roads will take more time to clear with freezing temperatures making it difficult to push two feet of snow off the roads. Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. is reporting that nearly 16,000 customers are still without power, including 6,500 in Anne Arundel County and 4,000 in Baltimore County.
NEWS
By TaNoah Sterling and TaNoah Sterling,Staff Writer | July 19, 1992
It's 90 degrees and children are running through the streets in their swimsuits, bathing in the cool water gushing from a nearby open fire hydrant and splashing their bare feet in puddles along the curb.This seemingly innocent summer scene occurs frequently in Baltimore neighborhoods. But opening the hydrants is a dangerous practice that can lead to injuries and hamper firefighters trying to battle a blaze, according to city officials.Jets of water streaming from hydrants under high pressure can knock small children into the paths of cars.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | February 8, 2009
THE PROBLEM: The sole hydrant on a street has been out of service for more than six months. THE BACKSTORY : Roy L. Shover Sr. wrote an e-mail to "Watchdog" to prevent, as he put it, "a very possible tragic event." His mother lives on Unetta Street off Wilkens Avenue in Southwest Baltimore. Shover says that the hydrant on her block has had an "out of service" sign on it for at least half a year and that it's the only hydrant on that street. He found other hydrants in the neighborhood "quite a distance from her home."
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