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By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | May 29, 1991
A Baltimore County fire official told a county judge yesterday that the season's hot, dry weather, along with the truckloads of debris being shipped to the stump dump burning in western Baltimore County, increases the chance that the fire will spread."
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BUSINESS
By BILL HUSTED and BILL HUSTED,The Atlanta Journal-Constitution | June 26, 2008
I just purchased a new Nikon professional-quality digital camera that allows interchangeable lenses. My old camera produced great pictures right off the storage card. But now I usually need to adjust my pictures using Photoshop Elements before they look right to me. Do I have a defective camera? - Debra McCarthy I can't know, but I can offer some possibilities. First, there are more settings with a DSLR (digital single-lens reflex), so it could be that you need to spend more time with the manual and experimenting - always a good idea before shooting big moments.
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NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Evening Sun Staff | May 31, 1991
Baltimore County Attorney H. Emslie Parks wanted James F. Jett's stump dump operation in Granite shut down until Jett mulches and removes a pile of stumps and debris the size of a football field.Instead, Baltimore County Circuit Court Judge James T. Smith Jr. ordered Jett shut down for today only and gave him until 44TC p.m. Sunday to mulch and remove the huge pile, a mound that county fire officials said -- and Smith agreed -- poses a fire hazard.This new pile of stumps and other debris, which Jett allows housing contractors to dump on his land for a fee, are within 100 feet of a much larger mound of stumps that have been burning since February.
NEWS
January 15, 2007
Annapolis' historic district has gone up in smoke many times over its three centuries. Newspaper accounts of such fires date back at least as far as 1790, and the downtown architecture now boasts a collection of buildings that represent virtually every period since then. Three devastating fires along Main Street in the past nine years are warning loud and clear, though, that these quaint old firetraps are going to have to be better protected or soon whole blocks may disappear. After a decade of dithering, it's time for the City Council to adopt the solution most favored by firefighters: sprinklers that can douse a blaze before it spreads.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Chris Guy and Heather Dewar and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1998
WILLARDS -- You know it's a bad fire season when a cypress swamp starts burning.The fire risk in Maryland is so high that a normally soggy Wicomico County swamp has gone up in flames. In the chilly hours after midnight yesterday, about 100 families were forced to leave their homes near this farm town because of dense smoke.About 160 firefighters took most of the day to knock down the 60-acre fire, but it will smolder until it rains or until everything flammable within the swamp has burned, state fire experts said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 21, 1998
State Farm, the nation's largest auto insurer, sued Ford Motor Co. yesterday, charging that the automaker installed defective ignition switches in 26 million cars and withheld information about the potential fire hazard from federal officials and customers.The federal lawsuit, an unusual display of public rancor between the insurance and auto industries, seeks to recover millions of dollars that State Farm has paid to repair fire damage to its customers' cars.It also hopes to recover deductibles of up to $1,000 absorbed by policyholders.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1998
IN AN EFFORT TO build much-needed rental housing on Baltimore's waterfront, could a local developer be creating a potential fire hazard?The question drew more than 50 Canton residents to a community meeting last week to discuss the proposed Lighthouse Landing, an 80-unit apartment complex planned for construction above a 200-space boat storage facility at 2701 Boston St.The meeting was scheduled after residents of neighboring housing developments expressed concern...
NEWS
By Michael Ollove | February 3, 1991
Baltimore County firefighters may need two or three days to extinguish a smoldering fire in a 75-foot high "stump dump" that for years has been the object of community loathing in Granite, a wooded, western portion of the county near Patapsco State Park."
NEWS
April 12, 1995
It was a perfect spring weekend: clear skies, mild temperatures and the beckoning outdoors. A balmy feeling of bonhomie pervaded the suburban landscape, the lawns reborn in verdant splendor, daffodils and jonquils bursting into eloquent shades of butter and eggs. A fitting occasion to haul out the dusty charcoal grill and stoke up the barbecue to celebrate the seasonal ritual. Singe a steak, char a chicken.But wait! State officials imposed a total ban on outdoor burning as the weekend began, fearful of the spread of uncontrolled fires in field and forest amid highly threatening weather conditions.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Evening Sun Staff | August 2, 1991
A Baltimore County Circuit judge found James Jett, operator of a Granite stump dump, which has been burning since February, in contempt of a May 30 court order and ordered him to immediately close the dump.Yesterday, Judge James T. Smith Jr. ordered Jett to refuse new loads of debris until he grinds up old stumps on the eastern half of the dump and excavates the area down to "ground zero" to remove any remaining fire hazard.The judge also criticized the county government, saying that different agencies sent Jett mixed and confusing messages in trying to regulate the burning mound of tree stumps at the dump in the 8700 block of Dogwood Road in the western part of the county.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 1, 2004
FAIRFAX, Va. - Speaking in a low voice, convicted Washington-area sniper John Allen Muhammad complained yesterday to the judge who will preside over his next trial that his Northern Virginia jailers give him inadequate access to his voluminous legal files and are not letting him wear underwear to court. "How does it make this courtroom safe with me coming into this courtroom with no T-shirt, no underwear and no socks?" asked Muhammad, who attended a July court hearing barefoot. He implored the judge, "Can you please find out about my underwear?"
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 13, 2003
Anne Arundel County firefighters extinguished a chlorine fire in Harwood on Monday and asked the residents of 10 houses to stay indoors until smoke from the blaze dissipated. The fire was reported about 8 p.m. in the 100 block of Harwood Drive and was confined to two 5-gallon buckets of chlorine, said fire Capt. Michael Cox. He said the owners of the house where the fire occurred were not at home at the time of the fire and that a neighbor called 911. Cox said the buckets of chlorine might not have been properly sealed and that rainwater might have reacted with the chlorine, sparking the fire.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2002
The Housing Authority shut down a recreation center for two Annapolis public housing developments Monday after it was found that roof leaks had allowed water to enter the electrical system, creating a potential fire hazard. The city's electrical inspector, Clint Pratt, said he declared the Eastport building "unfit for habitation" and ordered the Housing Authority to replace the roof before reopening the building. The move is the latest problem arising from deteriorating conditions at the authority's 10 properties - which have brought criticism of the authority and its executive director, P. Holden Croslan.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2002
Dozens of units at an Annapolis public housing complex remain in violation of the city's fire code despite a $130,000 window replacement project designed to bring the complex into compliance, a fire official said yesterday. The problem: plywood boards installed by the Annapolis Housing Authority in recent weeks as a makeshift solution so that air conditioning units would fit the new windows at the 149-unit Robinwood community off Forest Drive. The plywood covers the open half of the windows, which slide left to right, and keeps the other half from opening - leaving too little room for residents to escape in the event of a fire, said Capt.
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2001
City and state officials say that a North Baltimore doctor and newspaper publisher is responsible for one of the largest illegal tire junkyards in Maryland, and they are asking a District Court judge to force him to clean it up. Dr. Bernard Kapiloff, a retired plastic surgeon, has failed for seven months to make good on promises to clean up his company's condemned 3-acre lot on a desolate dead end in Park Heights, officials say. The roughly 18,000 tires...
NEWS
March 10, 2001
IT LOOKS as if the movement to close the troubled Cheltenham Youth Center in southern Prince George's County is going to succeed. It should have happened years ago. This is the state's largest and most dangerous facility for delinquent youths, who are detained there while awaiting trial or placement in a treatment program. It's a symbol of the Glendening administration's disgraceful failure to deal with juvenile delinquency. In the past year, one youth has been stabbed by a state employee and another gang-raped.
NEWS
May 14, 1993
Fire hazard delays work at Harbour HouseRenovations at Harbour House have been delayed again, this time by the discovery of a fire hazard that will cost $500,000 to correct and will prevent residents from moving back into their apartments until late next month.City fire inspectors found a four-inch gap between the utility areas on the balconies outside the apartments and the building, said Harold S. Greene, executive director of the Annapolis Housing Authority.Inspectors said the gap -- between the air-conditioning units outside and the building -- would create a chimney effect and allow a fire to spread rapidly through the building.
NEWS
By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Evening Sun Staff | July 31, 1991
The piles of debris may have shrunk at the Granite stump dump, fire officials say, but they worry that where the stuff has been buried, it will provide fresh tinder for the fire that still smolders underground.Comparing aerial photographs of the site taken over the past few months, Chief Roy Kimmer of the Baltimore County fire prevention office said, "The pile has diminished greatly from that, but what we're worried about is where it went after that." And if it simply has been moved and covered with dirt, he said, "what bothers me is the fire may get underneath that pile."
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1998
An Argentine-flag tank ship hauling South African molasses has become a reluctant resident of the Dundalk Marine Terminal, detained by U.S. Coast Guard officials who call it a hazard to the environment and to the ship's crew.One of the Campo Duran's main engines doesn't work and the ship can't produce fresh water for drinking and bathing, the Coast Guard said yesterday. The ship also is leaking oil into its bilge so profusely that one of its cargo holds was converted to a slop tank, and the water separator required to clean the bilge doesn't work.
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