Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFire Deaths
IN THE NEWS

Fire Deaths

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
November 26, 2000
Problems with home heating equipment were the leading cause of fire deaths in American homes between December and February last winter, according to a recent report from the National Fire Protection Association. The report estimated that 406 people died and 1,350 were injured in 59,700 home heating fires nationwide in 1999. One-third of home fire deaths occurred during the winter months. According to the NFPA, the major causes of home heating fires include: lack of regular chimney cleaning in fireplaces and wood stoves, flammable items placed too close to space and portable heaters; installation and design flaws with heating equipment; fueling errors with liquid- or gas-fueled heaters; and portable or space heaters left unattended.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2013
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has picked the former chief of the Lincoln, Neb. fire department to lead Baltimore's fire department as it undergoes sweeping changes. Niles Ford, 48, a career firefighter who most recently was the manager of a small city in Georgia, will begin work Jan. 22, the mayor is expected to announce Monday. He will be paid $165,000. "His resume has a really, really strong mix of managerial experience, fiscal stewardship, which is very important to me, and on-the-ground experience," Rawlings-Blake said Sunday.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Roger Twigg | December 28, 1990
Fires will probably kill fewer people in Baltimore this year than in any other year since 1938, and fire officials see the relatively low death toll as hopeful evidence that a smoke-detector program begun in 1982 is beginning to prove its worth."
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2013
Baltimore Fire Department officials identified the woman who died in a Northeast Baltimore apartment fire on Thursday as Laverne Allen, 54. Firefighters found the victim unconscious in her apartment in the 4400 block of Marble Road after it caught fire early Thursday, and she was taken to a local hospital where she was pronounced dead. Allen's death brings to 19 the number of fire fatalities this year, after three years of declines that brought the figure to a low of 12 last year.
NEWS
January 16, 1998
FIRE DEATHS in Baltimore during winter are as expected as cold winds and frost. It has to do with the city's poverty, which has too many families using dangerous methods to provide light and heat. It has to do with the city's old housing stock, which can have people sleeping in multistoried dwellings that become deathtraps in any blaze.No matter how common fire deaths become, they're never easy to accept. Each time, the rest of us are left to ponder what might have been done differently to save a life.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen | September 25, 1995
Reflecting the U.S. trend, the number of fire deaths in Maryland has been declining, although last year it bucked the downturn.Between 1981 and 1988, an average of 21.8 per 1 million state residents died as a result of fire. That ranked Maryland 21st worst among the 50 states, with Mississippi (49.6 per 1 million) at the top.Neighboring Virginia (16th) and Pennsylvania (17) fared slightly worse, while Delaware (23rd) did slightly better, according to the analysis by the National Fire Protection Association.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 13, 1998
The number of people killed in Baltimore fires increased slightly from 1996 to 1997, but officials say the overall numbers continue to show a trend toward fewer deaths.They attribute the trend to a single factor -- more smoke detectors.Twenty-four people died in fires last year in Baltimore, compared with 22 in 1996. Those figures were lower than any previous year going back to 1938, fire officials said.Fire Chief Herman Williams Jr. said the numbers for 1996 and 1997 are both so low they represent a dramatic drop.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 25, 1995
JACKSON, Miss. -- If fighting fire can be likened to a perpetual war, then this nation is winning -- gradually, quietly, but inexorably.Last year, 4,275 U.S. civilians died as a result of fire, the fewest since standardized record-keeping began in 1913. The number is more dramatic when the nation's population growth is considered: 16.4 deaths per million population last year compared with 25.3 deaths per million just 12 years ago.Why such a leap? While firefighter heroics and their contemporary techniques have helped -- horse-drawn wagons and bucket brigades being a thing of the past -- the answers don't hinge on what firefighters call "spraying the wet stuff on the red stuff."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Reporter | December 17, 2007
A Salisbury couple and a young child perished early yesterday in a fast-moving fire that destroyed their 1 1/2 -story frame home. The fire brings to 90 the number of fire fatalities in Maryland this year, compared with 57 at this time last year. "I've been around a long time, and I don't recall us ever having this many fire deaths," said Deputy State Fire Marshal Joseph Zurolo Jr. The Salisbury Fire Department was alerted to the blaze at 514 Washington St. by a 911 call from a neighbor at 3:34 a.m. Firefighters had the flames under control in 10 to 15 minutes, Zurolo said, but when they entered the structure they found all three occupants dead on the first floor.
NEWS
By Chris Bubeck and Chris Bubeck,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | March 27, 1998
ANNAPOLIS - Maryland fire deaths rose slightly last year but were still the second-lowest number since 1975, according to a report by the Maryland state fire marshal.The 74 deaths caused by fires in 1997, up from 62 the year before, were well below the five-year average of 85 fatalities and down from a high of 184 fire deaths reported in 1975.Deputy State Fire Marshal W. Faron Taylor attributed the drop in deaths to the increased use of smoke detectors and to fire prevention education. He pointed to such programs as Operation Safe Home, which equips Eastern Shore homes with smoke detectors, and efforts to reduce fires in Baltimore City.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2013
The death of a woman pulled from her blazing apartment Thursday prompted criticism from city fire union officials about recent company closures and pledges from officials to step up safety campaigns. Firefighters found the woman unconscious in her Northeast Baltimore apartment after it caught fire early Thursday. She was taken to a local hospital, where she was pronounced dead. Officials did not release her identity. Ten days earlier, another woman died in a fire in the same part of the city.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2013
Fire investigators found cigarettes and a lighter in the hospital bed of a man who died in a fire at University of Maryland Medical Center, but the cause of the fire has not been conclusively determined, a report of the incident shows. The report provides the first information released in the Nov. 8 death of William Turner, 53, at the downtown Baltimore hospital. An autopsy earlier determined that Turner died of smoke inhalation and burns that caused complications to his underlying hypertensive cardiovascular disease.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
A 66-year-old woman has died after she was injured in a fire in the Pigtown neighborhood of Baltimore last month, fire department officials said Friday. Louise Helmick was one of two people taken the burn unit at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center after the fire, which broke out in a two-story home in the 1300 block of W. Cross St. at around 3 a.m. on Oct. 24. She had second-degree burns and smoke inhalation, the fire department said. She died on Nov. 7, and the medical examiner found the cause to be sepsis from the burns.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2013
Two elderly people died Thursday afternoon after being pulled from a burning home near Loyola University Maryland, Baltimore fire officials said. Mark Wagner, assistant chief of operations at the Baltimore Fire Department, said a man and woman were found in a front, first-floor room and taken in grave condition to Union Memorial Hospital, where they were pronounced dead. The two deaths would push the number of people killed in fires in Baltimore this year to 16 after another man was killed in a fire Wednesday.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2013
A fire in a Southwest Baltimore apartment building Sunday afternoon left one woman dead and required dozens of evacuations, Baltimore fire officials said. The fire was reported about 2:15 p.m. and was under control before 3 p.m., fire department spokesman Ian Brennan said. It started in and was contained to one apartment in the five-story building at 1820 Spence Street, he said, but heavy smoke spread throughout it, requiring the evacuations. Firefighters found the woman, who has not yet been identified by fire officials, in an apartment on the second floor that was filled with "tons of smoke," Brennan said.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2013
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's press secretary is leaving the mayor's office to become the spokesman for the city's fire department. Ian Brennan, who also served as a spokesman for former Mayor Sheila Dixon, will replace Kevin Cartwright, who retired earlier this year, as the department's Public Information Officer. He will earn $92,000 annually. “I am excited that Mr. Brennan is joining our team,” Fire Chief James Clack said in a statement. “His public communications experience will be an asset as we work to further reduce fire deaths and improve public safety throughout Baltimore.” A passionate defender of Rawlings-Blake's policies, Brennan, 38, also served in the administrations of three New Jersey Governors, James E. McGreevey, Richard J. Codey and John S. Corzine.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | October 5, 1992
Local firefighters have scheduled a series of open houses at fire stations and will be preaching safety tips this week as they highlight National Fire Prevention Week, which ends Sunday.Firefighters will demonstrate how to use fire extinguishers, how to use and maintain smoke detectors, and will offer safety tips for children, said Deputy Chief Edgar G. Shilling, of the county's bureau of fire prevention. People think "it happens to the guy down the street, but not to me," he said.During the first eight months of this year, 54 people have died in fires statewide, according to the Office of the State Fire Marshal.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2013
The death of a woman pulled from her blazing apartment Thursday prompted criticism from city fire union officials about recent company closures and pledges from officials to step up safety campaigns. Firefighters found the woman unconscious in her Northeast Baltimore apartment after it caught fire early Thursday. She was taken to a local hospital, where she was pronounced dead. Officials did not release her identity. Ten days earlier, another woman died in a fire in the same part of the city.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2013
City confirmed Saturday that a man and a woman whose bodies were found in a burning car in West Baltimore early Friday morning had been shot. Police said it was still not clear whether they were killed by bullets or the fire and had no more information on the cause of the blaze. The fire was discovered at about 5 a.m. in the 2000 block of N. Monroe St. in the Mondawmin neighborhood, fire officials said. "Whether or not they are fire victims or otherwise has to be determined by the state medical examiner," Baltimore City Fire Department spokesman Chief Kevin Cartwright said Friday.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2013
A 50-year-old woman died early Saturday after a fire in a Glen Burnie home, the second fire-related fatality in Anne Arundel County of the new year. County Fire Department Division Chief Keith Swindle said Shari Lee DeStefano was found in the basement of a one-story house in the Marley area and transported to Baltimore Washington Medical Center, where she died of her injuries shortly after midnight. Nine adults and two children were displaced by the fire and given shelter, Swindle said, and as of Sunday afternoon, they were still unable to return home.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.