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By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer | February 26, 1995
Also, a photo caption accompanying an article Sunday on the first black fire captain in Baltimore County contained incorrect information. Activists in the Fire Department praised Acting Chief James H. Barnes for racial progress in the department but criticized actions of previous fire chiefs.The Sun regrets the errors.Mark E. Garrett's promotion as the first black captain in the Baltimore County Fire Department symbolizes a lack of racial progress as much as a step forward, says an organization of black county firefighters.
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SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2014
She hails from a family of Baltimore firefighters, but Summer Britcher's life runs counter. She battles the ice. One of the youngest members of the Olympic luge team, Britcher, 19, is competing in her first Winter Games in Sochi, Russia. Opening ceremonies are Friday and come Monday she'll lay on her back and rattle her sled down a frozen track with 17 banked turns for nearly one mile at speeds exceeding 80 miles an hour. Sans brakes. "It's terrifying, but I'm hooked," Britcher said.
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NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,[Sun reporter] | March 13, 2007
A Baltimore Fire Department captain faces internal sanctions for speaking to The Sun about a fatal training exercise in which one recruit died and two others were injured. Capt. Brian K. Edwards, who worked in the department's training academy for six years, could face punishment ranging from a verbal reprimand to suspension without pay, a department spokesman said yesterday. Edwards' comments raising questions about the abilities of Battalion Chief Kenneth Hyde Sr., who was later fired by the mayor, violated a rule that effectively bars firefighters from speaking to the media without prior approval.
NEWS
December 31, 2013
There certainly seems to be a measure of risk involved in the announcement that Niles Ford has been named the new Baltimore City fire chief ( "Rawlings-Blake picks former Nebraska fire chief to lead Baltimore's department," Dec. 28). This selection will certainly not sit well with some, as two candidates with the Baltimore City Fire Department were overlooked for the position. Mr. Ford's last employment as city manager in Chamblee, Ga., ended in a very inauspicious manner. There are many questions regarding his capability to lead a department as large as the one here.
NEWS
October 3, 1997
ANNAPOLIS FIRE Captain Gene Kirchner still has a great deal to explain.He has been cleared of the most egregious charges that he blocked his firefighters from rendering aid to a heart attack victim during a call last summer. Nevertheless, the veteran firefighter remains under investigation for using inappropriate language after that call, during which 28-year-old Sean E. Lucas died of a heart attack.Race is at the center of this controversy. Mr. Lucas, a black man in poor health, had called emergency assistance numerous times since the beginning of the year.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Andrea F. Siegel and Dan Thanh Dang and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1997
The father of a 28-year-old Annapolis man said yesterday he was "totally shocked" to hear allegations that a white city fire captain may have blocked lifesaving medical care for his son, who is black.A federal civil rights investigation has begun into the July 14 death of Sean E. Lucas, of the 1100 block of Primrose Court. Allegations became public this weekend that Capt. Gene Kirchner, a 30-year Fire Department veteran, delayed efforts to help Lucas and then used a racial slur to refer to him after he died.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2011
A quick-acting Howard County fire captain who found himself in North Carolina during a tornado did what he was trained to do: Grab a sledgehammer and pry bar and start searching for people trapped under heavy wreckage. On assignment at a heavy vehicle rescue course in Sanford, N.C., last month, Capt. Michael Sharpe, 32, found himself at a flattened Lowe's Home Improvement store after a twister ripped through the town. It was a Saturday, and it was possible that customers or workers could be found under the a mound of collapsed steel, roofing members and cinderblock walls.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2002
NEW YORK - The story began with a journalist and a fire captain - two strangers who met in a Brooklyn living room one Saturday in September with a grim task at hand. On the morning of Sept. 11, the captain lost eight firefighters, and when faced with writing the sudden flurry of eulogies, words escaped him. That's when a friend arranged for former war correspondent Anne Nelson to help. Over five hours, Nelson applied her interviewing skills in an unconventional way, slowly drawing out the captain's recollections of the lives of his men. He talked about one who had been an older-brother figure, another who had just joined his crew, peppering the afternoon with moments that were emotional and, at times, tearful.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1997
A veteran Annapolis fire captain has retired amid a federal probe into allegations that he refused to help a black man, who had suffered a heart attack, and used a racial slur to refer to the man after the man died.Gene Kirchner, a 30-year veteran, would not comment on the allegations yesterday. He denied that his departure had anything to with the investigation. "I wanted to retire," said Kirchner, who is white.A spokesman for Baltimore's FBI office, Special Agent Larry K. Foust, said a federal civil rights investigation was launched several weeks ago and could result in criminal charges.
NEWS
August 5, 1993
Fire company in Lisbon picks new officersLisbon Volunteer Fire Company announced this week its newly elected officers: Kenneth Phebus, president; Albert Musgrove, vice president; Jerry Kiley, secretary; Emerson Pickett, treasurer; Jr. Sirk, chief; and Robert Mead, deputy chief.The company also announced newly appointed line officers: Gerald Bennett, fire captain; Richard Bowman, fire captain; Keith Bennett, fire lieutenant; Darrell Johnson, fire lieutenant; Scott Kowalo, fire lieutenant; Carey McIntosh, fire lieutenant; James Fitzgerald, EMS lieutenant; and Jeffrey Partridge, EMS lieutenant.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2013
Thomas M. Bailey Sr., a retired Baltimore Fire Department captain and fire academy instructor who was a decorated World War II veteran, died of cancer Saturday at Brightview Avondell independent living in Bel Air. The former Cedarcroft resident was 96. Family members said Mr. Bailey was raised as an orphan at the old St. Mary's Industrial School in Southwest Baltimore after his father died in a railroad accident and his mother died a year later....
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | February 5, 2013
It was a busy 2012 for members of Kingsville Volunteer Fire Company, who responded to 948 fire calls and 1,084 medic calls during the year, including some high-profile incidents. "The members and the community of Kingsville can be very proud of the fact that our company has once again performed as one of the top responding companies within the Baltimore County volunteer fire service system," Chief Michael J. Berna wrote to his fellow members in the program distributed during Saturday night's annual installation of officers banquet that celebrated the company's 59th years of service as well as the accomplishments of its volunteers in the last year.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2011
A quick-acting Howard County fire captain who found himself in North Carolina during a tornado did what he was trained to do: Grab a sledgehammer and pry bar and start searching for people trapped under heavy wreckage. On assignment at a heavy vehicle rescue course in Sanford, N.C., last month, Capt. Michael Sharpe, 32, found himself at a flattened Lowe's Home Improvement store after a twister ripped through the town. It was a Saturday, and it was possible that customers or workers could be found under the a mound of collapsed steel, roofing members and cinderblock walls.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun Reporter | July 16, 2008
Howard County Fire Capt. Stephen M. Hardesty remembers his parents telling him as a young child that the first words he spoke were "fire engine." For Lt. Joseph R. Ross, becoming an emergency medical services provider was following a family tradition of serving as career firefighters. After years of service, Hardesty and Ross will be recognized as Career Firefighter and Career EMS Provider of the Year, respectively, by the American Legion - Department of Maryland. They are to receive their awards at the organization's annual convention tomorrow in Ocean City.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN REPORTER | March 16, 2007
Fireman speaks up at meeting Lt. Michael D. Jenson sat through an hour of the fire board meeting yesterday, patiently waiting for his turn to speak. When his chance came, he stood up before the department's command staff and gave an impassioned talk about everything he feels is wrong with the department. He had a lot to unload. "I can honestly say that morale at the department is at an all-time low," he said, turning his attention to Fire Chief William J. Goodwin Jr., who had by then left the meeting.
NEWS
March 15, 2007
The Baltimore Fire Department defends its decision to discipline a fire captain for speaking publicly about a bungled training exercise, saying to do otherwise would send the wrong message to the troops. But if firefighters view the punishment as a warning against criticizing the agency, fire officials will have done the agency and the public a disservice. It's too easy to keep silent to protect a career. The fatal Feb. 9 training incident failed on so many levels that punishing those who commented on what happened that morning or the circumstances leading up to it sounds like a belated effort to stamp out criticism.
NEWS
By Jim Haner and Jim Haner,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2002
In his lifetime, Robert S. Meushaw was decorated for valor as a soldier and a Baltimore fire captain -- saving the lives of a dozen or more men from the beaches of New Guinea to South Howard Street. But in the end, his greatest legacy was an item that would grace thousands of tackle boxes owned by Maryland fisherman: the "Meushaw Jig." It was nothing less than "the most famous and productive lure the Chesapeake has ever seen for [rockfish]," wrote Sun columnist Bill Burton in 1990. "This small lead-headed feathered jig caught rock at the Bay Bridge when nothing else did."
NEWS
March 15, 2007
The Baltimore Fire Department defends its decision to discipline a fire captain for speaking publicly about a bungled training exercise, saying to do otherwise would send the wrong message to the troops. But if firefighters view the punishment as a warning against criticizing the agency, fire officials will have done the agency and the public a disservice. It's too easy to keep silent to protect a career. The fatal Feb. 9 training incident failed on so many levels that punishing those who commented on what happened that morning or the circumstances leading up to it sounds like a belated effort to stamp out criticism.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,[Sun reporter] | March 13, 2007
A Baltimore Fire Department captain faces internal sanctions for speaking to The Sun about a fatal training exercise in which one recruit died and two others were injured. Capt. Brian K. Edwards, who worked in the department's training academy for six years, could face punishment ranging from a verbal reprimand to suspension without pay, a department spokesman said yesterday. Edwards' comments raising questions about the abilities of Battalion Chief Kenneth Hyde Sr., who was later fired by the mayor, violated a rule that effectively bars firefighters from speaking to the media without prior approval.
NEWS
By GREG BARRETT and GREG BARRETT,SUN REPORTER | October 29, 2005
On a rare Friday off this month, Baltimore Fire Capt. Kenneth Hyde Sr. was pulled away from lunch with his wife at Rock Creek Diner in Pasadena to respond to a chlorine leak at the Montebello Water Filtration Plant. Two days later, he was jerked from his Sunday morning slumber to an oil spill that drained into the Inner Harbor. Even after spending 10 days in New Orleans helping with the Hurricane Katrina cleanup, and sleeping on a cot in a gymnasium in nearby Greta, La., Hyde got just one day to rest when he returned home.
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