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April 18, 1993
Fire and emergency medical calls handled by the Bel Air Volunteer Fire Company have risen by 18 percent during the first quarter of 1993, authorities said.Statistics show volunteers made 950 runs between Jan. 1 and March 31, an increase of 149 calls over the first quarter of 1992.Besides severe rain and snow in the first quarter of this year, Fire Chief Stephen Cox attributed the increase to electrical problems, grease fires and carelessness.No one has died in any of the 35 structural fires, and fire fighters have suffered only minor injuries, Chief Cox said.
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NEWS
By Brandi Bottalico, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
One person was rescued from a house fire at 120 E. Timonium Rd. and taken to the burn unit at Bayview Medical Center, according to Baltimore County Fire Dispatch. Twenty pieces of firefighting equipment were dispatched around 12:30 p.m. after a call was made to 911, Lt. Jay Ringgold said. The caller was disconnected while trying to escape the house. Lutherville Volunteer Fire Company and Texas Career Station located and rescued the woman, although excessive hoarding hampered the rescue attempt, Ringgold said.
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NEWS
By Kristina M. Schurr and Kristina M. Schurr,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | March 18, 1997
It's an emergency -- who ya gonna call?Well, it used to be the Anne Arundel County Fire Department.But not anymore.The department formerly known as Anne Arundel County Fire has a new moniker: Anne Arundel County EMS/Fire/Rescue.The new name reflects an essential shift in services, said Stephen D. Halford, county fire administrator."We used to be a fire department which occasionally handled emergency medical services calls. Our system has now evolved to the point where we are really an EMS department which occasionally handles fire calls," Halford said.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
Two years to the day after Baltimore police officer William H. Torbit Jr. was shot by fellow members of the department, members of his family staged small demonstrations in front of city buildings and called on officials to take a fresh look at the case. "There was no outside investigation," said Torbit's sister Venus Torbit. "We want the community to have the facts. " Family members held placards with Torbit's picture and gathered in small groups outside City Hall and police headquarters Wednesday.
NEWS
September 4, 2003
The Savage Volunteer Fire Company has received a $225,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, which it will use to replace a 17-year-old engine with a new truck better equipped for responding to rescue and fire calls, according to a statement yesterday from Maryland's U.S. senators. The fire company received the money through the Assistance to Firefighters Grant Program, which is open to fire departments across the nation, Democratic Sens. Barbara A. Mikulski and Paul S. Sarbanes said in the statement.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2000
Four months after Baltimore closed seven fire units, fire officials said they have seen no slippage in response time to fire calls but worry about a growing number of vacancies. At council chambers in City Hall, Chief Herman Williams Jr. and a firefighters union leader told City Council members last night that the number of vacancies in the department has reached 118, about double the usual number. The problem is a lack of qualified recruits, Williams said. Sixty positions are vacant in the ambulance service and 49 among firefighters, he said, and 70 firefighters will soon be eligible to retire.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1999
The county planning commission approved yesterday a revised Emergency Services Master Plan that calls for continued funding of services at current levels, improved recruitment and retention of volunteers and enhanced public education.The plan, which had not been revised since 1981, was presented to the Carroll County Planning and Zoning Commission by Oscar Baker, chairman of the Emergency Services Master Plan Update Committee, and Robert P. Cumberland Jr., president of the Carroll County Volunteer Firemen's Association.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff writer | April 7, 1991
Members of the Jarrettsville Volunteer Fire Company have a way for your name to go down in histoty.As part of the company's effort to raise money to build a new fire station - dubbed the "Buy a Brick Campaign." contributors' names will be inscribed in the walkway of the new station.Proceeds from the campaign will go toward paying off the remaining cost of the new $1.4 million fire station.The company plans to sell its 29-year-old station for $600,000, which also will go toward the new firehouse, said Thurman Ellis, the company's campaign chairman.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2000
State emergency officials are considering about a dozen potential sites for a new tower to provide better mobile and portable radio coverage for Lineboro's fire and ambulance crews. The tower, which will need to be about 340 to 400 feet tall, will help eliminate a gap in emergency communications and extend mobile radio coverage as far as York, Pa., Howard S. "Buddy" Redman, county director of public safety, told the Carroll County commissioners during a recent update. Lineboro volunteers frequently provide mutual aid service in York County, and several of the possible sites for the tower are in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 29, 1998
A FEW MORE months of specialized training and 16-year-old Josh Spicer will be able to respond to fire calls, to work shoulder to shoulder with experienced firefighters many years his senior.He has wanted to fight fires for a long time. Four years ago, after the sixth grade, Josh became a junior firefighter at Manchester Fire Engine & Hook & Ladder Co. No. 1."I always liked firetrucks," he said, "and I wanted in."As a junior firefighter, he has taken classroom and hands-on training, advancing into the senior group that trained a few weeks ago at Carroll County Fire Training Center in Westminster.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2011
Paramedic Kevin Hook's vehicle speeds up Lombard Street, weaving through traffic. His 7 a.m. shift as acting lieutenant at Baltimore's John F. Steadman Fire Station has just begun and Hook is monitoring dozens of calls scrolling down a monitor mounted on the dashboard of his SUV. There's an oil spill requiring a hazardous materials team to the east, a car crash to the west and a victim suffering from a stroke ahead on West Baltimore Street....
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Liz. F. Kay and Julie Scharper and Liz. F. Kay , julie.scharper@baltsun.com and liz.kay@baltsun.com | December 10, 2009
Neighborhood leaders, union heads and current and former Baltimore officials are stepping up calls to halt the money-saving practice of rotating fire-company closures after a man died in a rowhouse blaze early Wednesday just blocks from a shuttered firefighting unit. City firefighters "are at the breaking point right now, and we might have seen that last night," said Councilman Nicholas D'Adamo, a member of a volunteer board that advises the Fire Department. "We need to give [the department]
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | June 3, 2007
Scott McNutt's first six months as a call-taker in the county emergency operations center have been busier than he could have imagined. The 21-year-old Bel Air resident has assisted in the births of two babies (both in the same week), consoled a man who had attempted suicide, and dispatched police and firefighters to emergencies ranging from fires and car accidents to water main breaks and gas leaks. None of that includes being injured in a fire last month in his other job. McNutt works from 11 p.m. to 7 a.m., answering 911 calls at the EOC. By day, he switches roles and responds to calls as a volunteer firefighter for the Bel Air company.
NEWS
By THOMAS SOWELL | July 27, 2006
Those of us old enough to remember World War II face many painful reminders of how things have changed in Americans' behavior during a war. Back then, the president's defeated opponent in the 1940 election, Wendell Willkie, not only supported the war, he became a personal envoy from President Franklin D. Roosevelt to British Prime Minister Winston Churchill. We were all in it together - and we knew it. People who had been highly critical of American foreign policy before we were attacked at Pearl Harbor now fell silent and devoted themselves to winning the war. What if the people, institutions, and attitudes of today were somehow taken back in time to World War II?
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS and MELISSA HARRIS,SUN REPORTER | May 17, 2006
Howard County investigators have ruled that arson caused a one-unit fire at the Dorsey's Forge Apartments in Columbia on Friday afternoon. Firefighters rescued 52-year-old Nancy Culpepper from the fire in her fourth-floor apartment in the 9600 block of Whiteacre Road and took her to Maryland Shock Trauma Center for treatment of smoke inhalation. A spokeswoman for the Baltimore hospital said federal law prohibited her from releasing information about Culpepper's condition. Firefighters said another woman was treated at the scene for an asthma attack.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2005
In search of new experiences and meaning in her life, Becky Tims decided to become a volunteer with the Sykesville-Freedom District Fire Department. "I've been a wife and mother, I've worked in an office 25 years, I've never done anything physical like this," said Tims, 45, of Sykesville. "I'm afraid of heights, I'm claustrophobic, I freeze up - if somebody tells me to run, they'll have to carry me out." Her decision to volunteer came after participating in the department's Firefighter Fantasy Weekend - "not only to challenge myself but also find out what kind of person it takes to get outside their comfort zone to do this," she said.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 26, 1999
Baltimore County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger's plan to move all firefighters out of the Sparrows Point Fire Station this summer has angered union and management officials at Bethlehem Steel Corp., who say the move would jeopardize the safety of up to 8,500 workers.Ruppersberger's budget, unveiled last week, calls for transferring the fire engine, the ladder truck and the 40 firefighters assigned to them from Sparrows Point, but keeping eight paramedics at the station around the clock.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | January 23, 1997
Leaders of Sykesville-Freedom District Fire Department say they're fighting a losing battle in fast-growing South Carroll -- an ever-increasing demand for fire and ambulance service with fewer and fewer volunteers to answer calls.Last year, the department responded to 1,569 emergency and 851 fire calls. That's an increase of about 50 fire calls from 1995, but a worse problem, fire officials say, is the one-third increase in emergency medical calls in the past five years.The department's 150 volunteers serve a 34-square-mile area with a population of 24,789, second in size and number only to Westminster, the county's largest district, and Sykesville-Freedom's leaders aren't sure how they'll keep pace.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2005
Under fire from Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski and others, the Navy backed away yesterday from a proposal to resume bombing, strafing and live-fire military exercises on an island in the Chesapeake Bay. During a Senate subcommittee hearing on the Navy's budget yesterday, Mikulski told Navy Secretary Gordon England that the residents of Maryland's Eastern Shore were agitated about the proposal, first reported March 4 in The Sun. "Remember, they fought off...
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