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NEWS
June 28, 2010
Isn't it about time that the Baltimore Sunpapers stop denigrating Baltimore City fire and police pension members and also state of Maryland employees? When I was a 12 year-old Sunpapers delivery boy (65 years ago), the Sunpapers were against firefighters getting a raise, and, in my own way, I opposed this by stuffing Local 734 American Federation of Labor pamphlets citing reasons for the raise into my 200 paper route newspapers. I might add that as a retired Maryland state employee, I do not receive anywhere near the $35,000 per year amount quoted in your recent articles for State Employees, and I know most retired Fire and Police pensioners do not receive the excessive $63,000 per year amounts as stated in recent issues either.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 13, 2014
Baltimore's Police and Fire unions pay more into their pension fund than any other city unions. When the city enacted legislation to basically freeze cost of living raises for fire and police until the age of 55 with a paltry 1 percent raise, then 2 percent at 62, it was not only age discrimination but breech of contract. They even froze cost of living increases for fire and police injured in the line of duty. What is so shameful about the whole thing is that the politicians still managed to fully fund their pension system while still giving daily cost of living increases to retired politicians.
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NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | May 19, 2009
Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon has withdrawn a pension reform bill that would have stripped a lucrative post-retirement benefit from the financially troubled fire and police pension plan and was opposed by the city's public safety unions. "We're looking for a bigger fix for the system," Dixon's spokesman, Scott Peterson, said. The Administration plans to make more comprehensive changes to the $1.677 billion pension system. The bill's withdrawal was applauded by the city's police union chief, who said that the unions now can also "look at the bigger picture" and suggest broader reforms to the pension system.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2013
Baltimore police are looking for arsonists responsible for throwing about a dozen crude incendiary devices at buildings since late April. One of the homes hit by the devices - made from bottles and jugs - belonged to a Muslim family in North Baltimore. A preliminary investigation suggested that the incident was hate-related, Baltimore police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi said. But investigators now believe it was one in a series of attacks on apparently random places. "There's a Muslim family who's had an incident and we've talked to them at length," said Baltimore police Sgt. Dennis Raftery, who leads arson investigations.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | February 7, 2002
For the second time in less than a week, a suspicious fire broke out yesterday in an Upper Park Heights building used by an Orthodox Jewish congregation. Investigators from the city fire and police departments and the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms have not ruled on the cause of a fire early Saturday at the Etz Chaim Center for Jewish Studies in the 3700 block of Fords Lane. But the second fire, which started shortly before 7 a.m. yesterday at Machzikei Torah Congregation in the 6200 block of Biltmore Ave., about a block from Etz Chaim, has been ruled an arson, fire and police spokesmen said.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | April 3, 2009
Baltimore City Council President Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake called Thursday for the city's fire and police pension board to sue to recover funds lost in the Bernard L. Madoff financial scandal. The pension fund lost about $3.1 million after a hedge fund in which it was invested, Union Bancaire Privee Asset Management, placed money in another fund that invested with Madoff. During a council meeting she called to discuss the matter, Rawlings-Blake pointed to a recent Wall Street Journal article that alleges UBP researchers warned its money managers not to do business with Madoff.
NEWS
August 13, 2014
Baltimore's Police and Fire unions pay more into their pension fund than any other city unions. When the city enacted legislation to basically freeze cost of living raises for fire and police until the age of 55 with a paltry 1 percent raise, then 2 percent at 62, it was not only age discrimination but breech of contract. They even froze cost of living increases for fire and police injured in the line of duty. What is so shameful about the whole thing is that the politicians still managed to fully fund their pension system while still giving daily cost of living increases to retired politicians.
NEWS
October 15, 1993
Fire and police investigators are seeking information in Tuesday's arson fire in an abandoned house in Hampstead.Firefighters from Hampstead, Manchester, Lineboro and Arcadia were dispatched to the house, in the 1600 block of N. Main St., about 4 p.m. They discovered a fire in the living room.The fire, which was confined to that area, caused about $1,000 damage.Investigators said they are searching land records to determine the former owner of the house.No one was injured in the one alarm blaze.
NEWS
BY A SUN REPORTER | October 17, 2005
A Mount Airy junkyard fire burned 150 vehicles yesterday and sent smoke billowing for miles from southwest Carroll County, fire officials said. Firefighters were dispatched to the 3900 block of Twin Arch Road at 6:46 p.m. A fire dispatcher said several surrounding fire and police departments assisted in putting out the blaze, which was under control by 11 p.m. Officials could not say if the fire caused any injuries and were assessing damages and trying...
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | April 5, 2009
Baltimore City Council President Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake wants to tap a prominent business-group leader to head a commission examining the city's troubled fire and police pension system. Donald C. Fry, president and CEO of the Greater Baltimore Committee, has accepted an invitation from Rawlings-Blake and City Councilman William H. Cole IV to lead an effort to review a retirement program whose ballooning costs have created what both call a "fiscal crisis." "You want to make sure that these funds are sustainable and you do have enough money to support them," said Fry, a former Harford County state senator who is also heading a panel to award slot-machine licenses in Maryland.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2012
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake took the stand in federal court Thursday, telling a judge that her administration's 2010 overhaul of the fire and police pension plan was necessary for the public good. Attorneys for the city and for the police and fire unions questioned Rawlings-Blake for more than three hours. A lawyer representing the unions drew sharp remarks from the mayor when he suggested that the city could have raised taxes or cut services to fund the pension. "You get to deal with math, and I have to deal with a struggling city," Rawlings-Blake told Charles O. Monk II of the Saul Ewing law firm.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2010
The city's adult strip known as The Block, as seedy as it is historic, is, if nothing else a survivor. Civic leaders long ago erased references to the entertainment zone from tour books and promotional pamphlets, yet visitors still come to gawk and to indulge. A hundred federal agents converged on the clubs in 1971. One mayor tried to buy the clubs out. His successor tried to move them to the city's industrial hinterlands. State police sent 500 troopers in on raids in 1994. A grand jury investigated alleged kickbacks to liquor board inspectors.
NEWS
June 28, 2010
Isn't it about time that the Baltimore Sunpapers stop denigrating Baltimore City fire and police pension members and also state of Maryland employees? When I was a 12 year-old Sunpapers delivery boy (65 years ago), the Sunpapers were against firefighters getting a raise, and, in my own way, I opposed this by stuffing Local 734 American Federation of Labor pamphlets citing reasons for the raise into my 200 paper route newspapers. I might add that as a retired Maryland state employee, I do not receive anywhere near the $35,000 per year amount quoted in your recent articles for State Employees, and I know most retired Fire and Police pensioners do not receive the excessive $63,000 per year amounts as stated in recent issues either.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | June 27, 2010
When is a promise not a promise? People who loaned money to subprime homebuyers have one view. Those who bought stock in 1st Mariner Bank at $10 a share have another. (It's now $1.) So do those who expected long careers at Black & Decker and were laid off in a brutal recession. In an age of diminished resources, bad faith and dashed hopes, everybody's feeling jilted. But few groups sound as aggrieved as the government employees whose pensions are being cut by financially stressed states, cities and counties.
NEWS
By Marta H. Mossburg | June 8, 2010
Bankruptcy and debt default are a real possibility for cities around the country that can't pay their bills, largely caused by lavish retirement and health care benefits for employees that taxpayers couldn't afford even in good times. Los Angeles is headed down that road. Vallejo, Calif., filed for bankruptcy in 2008. Closer to home, Harrisburg, Pa., is exploring the option as a way to restructure bills it can't pay. And last week, Warren Buffet said at a hearing of the U.S. Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission in New York that his Berkshire Hathaway Inc. has been cutting its exposure to municipal debt because he foresees "a terrible problem" with state and local bonds.
NEWS
By Rebecca Hyler and Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2010
One person was hurt and 12 residents of an apartment complex in Bowleys Quarters were displaced after a three-alarm fire early Friday morning. A fire was reported at a building at the Seneca Bay Apartments in the 3700 block of White Pine Road at 3:41 a.m., with flames on the second floor that spread to the third floor, according to Division Chief Michael Robinson. The Bowleys Quarters Volunteer Fire Department was first on the scene, he said. About 100 personnel from 25 units reported to fight the blaze.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | January 29, 1992
Chanting "These Cuts Won't Heal" and "Where's Roger?" a boisterous crowd of about 1,000 Baltimore County workers, parents and children rallied in Towson late yesterday to protest the latest round of local budget cuts.Most of the demonstrators who gathered in the plaza between the old and new county courthouses were teachers and PTA members, although a large contingent of firefighters and smaller groups of police and other county workers also attended.County Executive Roger B. Hayden was in Annapolis for the day and not within earshot of the taunts aimed at him, but other top county administration officials watched the rally from office windows overlooking the plaza.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Evening Sun Staff | April 15, 1991
Although Baltimore County Executive Roger B. Hayden is not proposing any pay increases for county employees this coming fiscal year, he has agreed to a lucrative pension change for the 37 Fire Department chiefs whose association was the first organized employee group to endorse him during last year's election campaign.According to Battalion Chief Carroll W. Huffines, 49, president of the Baltimore County Fire Department Fire Officer's Association, Hayden has agreed to allow fire chiefs to retire after 20 years of service, regardless of age, with a full 50 percent pension -- the same plan accorded Police Department supervisors.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | October 22, 2009
Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon sent a clear message Wednesday to fire and police unions who have resisted her cost-saving furlough plan: We will go after your pay if talks on other concessions collapse. Led by Dixon, the city Board of Estimates authorized a reduction in police and fire salaries to save $8 million this year. The money is the final piece necessary to complete Dixon's $60.2 million midyear budget reduction plan, needed to close a hole left by state cuts and lower-than-expected revenue projections.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | May 19, 2009
Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon has withdrawn a pension reform bill that would have stripped a lucrative post-retirement benefit from the financially troubled fire and police pension plan and was opposed by the city's public safety unions. "We're looking for a bigger fix for the system," Dixon's spokesman, Scott Peterson, said. The Administration plans to make more comprehensive changes to the $1.677 billion pension system. The bill's withdrawal was applauded by the city's police union chief, who said that the unions now can also "look at the bigger picture" and suggest broader reforms to the pension system.
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