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By JAY HANCOCK | January 24, 2009
Mark Phillips of Ednor Gardens in Baltimore sees ads everywhere for Verizon's high-speed Internet and cable service. He reads about "FiOS" in the paper. He wants to be your customer, Verizon. His family keep jamming their slower DSL line with entertainment downloads. When he streams video from Hulu.com, his daughter might not be able to do schoolwork online. He doesn't really want Comcast's broadband product. FiOS lays fiber-optic cable right to your door, which he says is faster and more secure.
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BUSINESS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2014
Verizon Communications announced this week that its expanded Fios DVR television service is now available in the Baltimore region. The Quantum TV set top box can record six or 12 programs at once, depending on the customer's service plan, said Harry J. Mitchell, a Verizon spokesman. The box is capable of storing up to 200 hours of HD programming. The compact Quantum box replaces Fios existing hardware and can serve up to four additional televisions via a compact companion device.
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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
About 80 members of the Communications Workers of America protested at Baltimore City Hall Thursday against a deal between Verizon Wireless and cable companies that they said will hurt the city's chances of ever receiving the telecommuncation company's next-generation Internet broadband network, known as FiOS. In a deal with major cable companies across the country, Verizon Wireless plans to expand its fourth-generation wireless services after purchasing unused wireless spectrum from the cable providers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2013
There was lots of mail on the Fox telecast of the Ravens' epic win Sunday over the Vikings. In the interest of getting more reader reaction into this post, I'll keep my words to a minimum. I'll try anyway. I've noticed the "Z responds" part is sometimes longer than that to which I am responding. What can I say? Let's start with Kitty, who writes: Dear Z, I thoroughly enjoy your column in the Sun.  I must comment on the last 4 paragraphs of your column today (12/9/13).  I am a FiOS customer and was totally frustrated by the audio of Sunday's game.  As you described, I heard no sound, then English, Spanish, English, etc. for the entire 1st half.   I thought something was wrong with my TV.   You seem to have enjoyed Fox's coverage, but a graphic on the screen explaining the audio difficulties would have been greatly appreciated.  I listened to WBAL , which was difficult as they are a few minutes ahead of the video.  I would have loved to have heard from Hale, Myers, and Ryan on the broadcasting team, but I COULDN'T UNDERSTAND anything being said!
BUSINESS
By DAN THANH DANG | August 19, 2008
The Q: We've written a lot here about Verizon's fiber-optic video, voice and data services. Lots of people tell us how much they love it. Some people write to say they hate it, especially the problems they've had getting it installed properly. And some people, like reader Susan Gillette, just want to know when FiOS is coming to their neighborhood. "If you have written about why Verizon can cheerfully trumpet FiOS all over the airwaves but still doesn't have it in the city and won't say when it will be there, I missed the story," Gillette said.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK and JAY HANCOCK,SUN COLUMNIST | May 7, 2006
The next phase of the telecommunications revolution got to my street a couple of weeks ago, but it showed few signs of dissolving "all of the monopolies and hierarchies and pyramids and power grids of industrial society," as techno-seer George Gilder predicted a decade ago in Forbes magazine. Instead, it was a dozen guys with shovels, working incredibly hard, digging 3-foot holes so one quasi-monopoly, Verizon, can swipe business from another quasi-monopoly, Comcast. Whatever. I'm willing to wait for postindustrial anarcho-nirvana if I can save $20 on my cable bill.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2011
Verizon and Sinclair Broadcast Group have reached an agreement, according to Bill Fanshawe, general manager of Baltimore's WBFF and WNUV television stations. WBFF is owned and WNUV is managed by the Hunt Valley based broadcaster. "We have settled," Fanshawe said late Thursday. "So, we are pleased to announce that we have reached an agreemnent in principle for a new deal that will provide for continued carriage of our stations on the FiOS systems after December 31st, 2011. " What that means immediately is that the crawls across the bottom of the screen warning FiOS viewers that they might not be able to see "Glee" and NFL football games after Dec. 31, are history.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | February 18, 2009
Harford County residents will soon have another choice, and potentially a higher-speed one, when it comes to cable television service after a vote last night by the County Council. The seven-member panel voted unanimously to grant Verizon Communications Inc. a 15-year franchise to operate within the county, making it the second major cable supplier to operate there. For years, most residents who wanted cable had to subscribe to Comcast. "We consider this a very positive development," said Councilman Dion F. Guthrie, who represents the southern area of the county.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | November 25, 2007
Sales and simplicity - they're two things savvy shoppers love. And cable, telephone and Internet companies know it, which is why they're offering multiple services at a bargain rate all rolled into one bill. They call it bundling. And it has become part of a marketing blitz that comes with teaser discount rates in hopes of persuading you to dump your other providers and consolidate your communications. (See Verizon's "Bundle Up and Save!," Comcast's "Limited Time Offer Bundled Packages," and Millennium Digital Media's "Best Triple Play in Town."
NEWS
By JANET GILBERT | May 25, 2008
Everyone's heard of popular television programs like American Idol, Dancing with the Stars, CSI, Desperate Housewives and Grey's Anatomy. This is standard content for the basic water-cooler chat. But here in Janet's World, we are having some difficulty finding friends with whom we can converse about the stunts performed by contestants in the captivating, addictive, nightly episodes of Unbeatable Banzuke. Unbeatable Banzuke, a Japanese game show on a channel called G4, snuck into my home entirely by mistake one evening, when I was trying to recall the comedy channel's number on my Verizon Fios television system and found myself surfing channels way up in the 170s.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
About 80 members of the Communications Workers of America protested at Baltimore City Hall Thursday against a deal between Verizon Wireless and cable companies that they said will hurt the city's chances of ever receiving the telecommuncation company's next-generation Internet broadband network, known as FiOS. In a deal with major cable companies across the country, Verizon Wireless plans to expand its fourth-generation wireless services after purchasing unused wireless spectrum from the cable providers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2011
Verizon and Sinclair Broadcast Group have reached an agreement, according to Bill Fanshawe, general manager of Baltimore's WBFF and WNUV television stations. WBFF is owned and WNUV is managed by the Hunt Valley based broadcaster. "We have settled," Fanshawe said late Thursday. "So, we are pleased to announce that we have reached an agreemnent in principle for a new deal that will provide for continued carriage of our stations on the FiOS systems after December 31st, 2011. " What that means immediately is that the crawls across the bottom of the screen warning FiOS viewers that they might not be able to see "Glee" and NFL football games after Dec. 31, are history.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2011
Baltimore viewers haven't been able to watch an NFL football game or any popular Fox program on WBFF the last couple of weeks without seeing a repeated crawl across the bottom of the screen telling them that if they are Verizon FiOS viewer their programming on the channel might soon be disrupted. Here's the full message as it appears on Fox 45's website: Verizon Fios' current contract to carry this station expires on December 31, 2011, and based on the current status of negotiations we do not believe they will be carrying this station after that date.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2011
Within a half-hour of her arrival on the TV set, Kerri O'Dair was transformed from casually clad college student to the picture of a young lawyer, dressed in pearls, a black suit and high heels. While a stylist applied makeup, the 18-year-old studied her notes and prepared for her appearance on "School Court TV. " O'Dair, a student at the Community College of Baltimore County's Dundalk campus, plays the prosecutor in the latest episode of the courtroom drama, which airs this weekend on cable television at Comcast 45.2 or Fios 45.6.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay and Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2011
Clashes between Verizon Corp. and its workers have escalated as contract negotiations remain deadlocked and thousands of workers have been striking for more than a week. The company has trained current and retired managers to fill jobs, angering union workers, and a Communications Workers of America spokesman said replacement workers have hit several picketers with their vehicles. Meanwhile, Verizon officials say they have seen an increase in equipment sabotage since the strike began.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | March 28, 2011
Emails and phone calls from readers of this column who have had an unsatisfying experience with Verizon continue to come in — and Saturday, a pleasant woman who walks regularly through my neighborhood stopped by to tell me all about her unpleasant business with the humongous telecommunications company. She'd made a couple of appointments to have a Verizon technician come to her house to investigate a staticky line, and the tech never showed. That's a common complaint. I described a couple of frustrating experiences with Verizon customer service in columns in January and February — complaints that, placed alongside tsunami in Japan, seem wholly trivial.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | January 31, 2009
TIP 19 Start trimming your phone, Internet, cable costs Telecom services offer large and relatively pain-free ways to reduce household bills. Do you really need a land line telephone? Is premium cable worth the money? (Is any cable? TV stations still broadcast for free, although you'll need to buy a new TV or digital converter.) Can you really tell the difference between cable Internet and cheaper DSL? From a simple phone bill 20 years ago, household telecommunication expenses have bloomed into multiple layers that can add up to more than $300 a month.
BUSINESS
By DAN THANH DANG | February 10, 2008
A year ago in this column, we railed at Verizon for a raft of customer service complaints about the new fiber-optic video, voice and data services called FiOS that it rolled out in 13 states. At the time, Verizon conceded that it left potential clients waiting for no-show technicians or stuck with partially completed installations. The company said it would focus on improving customer service and avoid overbooking installation work. Well, the retooling either didn't quite take or Robert Hanna slipped through some big cracks.
NEWS
May 5, 2010
Redlining is a strong word. For those of us who lived through times when African-Americans were denied opportunities, that word gets under our skin. This is why I see the careless use of it as misleading and irresponsible when discussing Verizon's FiOS not being in Baltimore City. FiOS is in several Maryland towns where the population is largely diverse — such as Bowie, Capitol Heights, Dundalk, Essex, Glen Burnie, Milford Mills, Randallstown, Seat Pleasant and Woodlawn.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2010
If nothing else, last week's City Council hearing on why Verizon has not rolled out FiOS, its next-generation broadband Internet service, in Baltimore has put cable TV on the local media agenda. Viewers, whose eyes might normally glaze over at talk of cable and Internet delivery systems, are clearly thinking and talking about why and how cable TV programming is and isn't delivered to homes in this city. The discussion is part of a larger political and cultural one going on nationally about what some call "broadband equity": who does and who doesn't have access to the wealth of information now available to citizens of Digital America.
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