Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFiorina
IN THE NEWS

Fiorina

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2001
Expectations were high when Hewlett-Packard Co. hired Carleton S. "Carly" Fiorina in July 1999 to be its chief executive officer, making her one of only four women running Fortune 500 companies and the first to head a Dow 30 company. The former Lucent Technologies Inc. executive and one-time philosophy major was brought in to prepare the highly bureaucratic high-tech giant to do battle in the fast-moving Internet economy. The 46-year-old's timing couldn't have been worse. Fiorina took over just as the economy was beginning to slow and businesses were scaling back on technology spending.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Cox News Service | May 1, 2007
She was seen as both visionary and villain; corporate savior and spoiler. But five years after engineering the merger of Hewlett-Packard Co. and Compaq Computer Corp., Carly Fiorina says it's obvious she was right all along. In a telephone interview from Silicon Valley in California, where she still makes her home, Fiorina said she's not surprised HP is doing well today, and that archrival Dell Inc. is having problems. "The success of the company today is exactly what we predicted and expected," she said.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 20, 1999
PALO ALTO, Calif. -- Hewlett-Packard Co. yesterday named Carleton Fiorina, a Lucent Technologies executive, as president and chief executive, choosing a woman with ties to telecommunications companies to lead the No. 2 computer maker.Fiorina succeeds Lew Platt, 58, who will remain chairman until he retires Dec. 31. Fiorina, 44, becomes one of three women heading Fortune 500 companies. She'll run a Palo Alto corporation that helped create California's Silicon Valley and now has $47 billion in annual sales.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun staff | November 12, 2006
For years, political scientist Morris Fiorina has been going against the tide of conventional political wisdom that points to the growing polarization of the nation's electorate. The Stanford faculty member says that voters are not all that polarized, that there is actually a broad consensus on many seemingly divisive issues. He blames the political system for forcing voters to stake out polarized positions. "I'm feeling really good today," Fiorina said after last week's elections. "I think it was the revenge of moderation, the revenge of the middle."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 30, 2002
WILMINGTON, Del. - Hewlett-Packard Co. asked a judge to absolve Chief Executive Officer Carleton S. "Carly" Fiorina and Chief Financial Officer Robert P. Wayman of wrongdoing in gathering votes for an $18.3 billion bid for Compaq Computer Corp. Former Director Walter B. Hewlett, who opposes the acquisition, sued the company March 28, saying executives coerced Deutsche Bank AG to switch at least 17 million votes in favor of the purchase. He also claims Fiorina and her deputies misled investors about the potential benefits of the buyout.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 27, 2002
PALO ALTO, Calif. - Hewlett-Packard Co. Chief Executive Officer Carleton S. "Carly" Fiorina and Compaq Computer Corp. CEO Michael Capellas together might be paid more than $115 million if the two computer makers combine, director Walter B. Hewlett said. For weeks, Hewlett has been pressing the companies to disclose what top officials would be paid if shareholders approve HP's plan to buy Compaq. He says the pay packages may affect investors' votes on the deal. Yesterday, he released figures - two years' salary, bonuses and stock options - he said the companies considered when they announced the takeover agreement.
BUSINESS
By Cox News Service | May 1, 2007
She was seen as both visionary and villain; corporate savior and spoiler. But five years after engineering the merger of Hewlett-Packard Co. and Compaq Computer Corp., Carly Fiorina says it's obvious she was right all along. In a telephone interview from Silicon Valley in California, where she still makes her home, Fiorina said she's not surprised HP is doing well today, and that archrival Dell Inc. is having problems. "The success of the company today is exactly what we predicted and expected," she said.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2003
Twenty-five years ago, Carleton S. "Carly" Fiorina barely made it into the University of Maryland, College Park's graduate business school because she missed the application deadline. Not one to accept a slight setback, it took Fiorina just an hour to persuade then-Dean Rudy Lamone to grant her a waiver. It didn't take Lamone long to know he had a rising star on his hands. "She asked me, `How do you think a liberal arts student with a degree in philosophy and medieval studies from Stanford University will do against the analytical jocks you bring into the MBA program?
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 4, 2002
PALO ALTO, Calif. - Hewlett-Packard Co. Chairwoman and Chief Executive Officer Carelton S. "Carly" Fiorina will have little time to celebrate now that the company has completed the $18.9 billion purchase of Compaq Computer Corp. after an eight-month struggle. The 47-year-old CEO lobbied skeptical investors, fought heirs of her company's founders and convinced a judge that she hadn't misled shareholders in her push to close the deal. Investors say all of that might look easy compared with what's next: stitching together the world's second- and third-largest computer makers.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 13, 2002
PALO ALTO, Calif. - Hewlett-Packard Co.'s management team will keep their jobs, except for Chairman and Chief Executive Carleton S. "Carly" Fiorina, if the $22.2 billion acquisition of Compaq Computer Corp. isn't approved, dissident director Walter B. Hewlett said yesterday. "All of the senior team will stay; they are all valuable," Hewlett said during a conference call with investors and analysts. "If the merger is defeated, I don't think [Fiorina] will have the credibility to lead this company."
BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | March 31, 2005
PALO ALTO, Calif. - In his first appearance as Hewlett- Packard Co.'s soon-to-be chief executive, Mark Hurd said yesterday that the technology industry giant is "fundamentally sound" but clearly is not performing up to its potential. Hurd gave no indication of immediate changes at the world's No. 2 maker of personal computers, saying at a news conference that he had been at HP's Palo Alto headquarters less than 24 hours. He also stopped short of saying whether the Silicon Valley stalwart should remain intact.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 17, 2005
PALO ALTO, Calif. - A week after ousting Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Carleton S. "Carly" Fiorina for failing to produce the profits she promised, Hewlett-Packard Co. reported yesterday that its fiscal first-quarter earnings were little changed. Revenue rose on holiday printer sales. Net income increased to $943 million, or 32 cents a share, from $936 million, or 30 cents, in the first quarter a year ago, HP said. Sales rose 9.9 percent to $21.5 billion from $19.51 billion, slightly beating analysts' estimates for the quarter that ended Jan. 31. HP, the world's largest printer maker and No. 2 personal-computer company, struggled to boost sales and profit as Dell Inc. became the biggest PC maker and began selling printers.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2003
Twenty-five years ago, Carleton S. "Carly" Fiorina barely made it into the University of Maryland, College Park's graduate business school because she missed the application deadline. Not one to accept a slight setback, it took Fiorina just an hour to persuade then-Dean Rudy Lamone to grant her a waiver. It didn't take Lamone long to know he had a rising star on his hands. "She asked me, `How do you think a liberal arts student with a degree in philosophy and medieval studies from Stanford University will do against the analytical jocks you bring into the MBA program?
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 5, 2002
BOSTON - Hewlett-Packard Co., the world's largest maker of personal computers, blamed lower demand as it reduced its sales estimates yesterday for the second half of its fiscal year, which ends Oct. 31. The forecast was the company's first since buying Compaq Computer Corp. Acquisition costs related to Compaq will be $2.6 billion, 86 percent more than forecast, because of higher severance expenses and $500 million to write off good will, said Jeffrey J. Clarke, Compaq's former chief financial officer and co-leader of the integration team.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 4, 2002
PALO ALTO, Calif. - Hewlett-Packard Co. Chairwoman and Chief Executive Officer Carelton S. "Carly" Fiorina will have little time to celebrate now that the company has completed the $18.9 billion purchase of Compaq Computer Corp. after an eight-month struggle. The 47-year-old CEO lobbied skeptical investors, fought heirs of her company's founders and convinced a judge that she hadn't misled shareholders in her push to close the deal. Investors say all of that might look easy compared with what's next: stitching together the world's second- and third-largest computer makers.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 30, 2002
WILMINGTON, Del. - Hewlett-Packard Co. asked a judge to absolve Chief Executive Officer Carleton S. "Carly" Fiorina and Chief Financial Officer Robert P. Wayman of wrongdoing in gathering votes for an $18.3 billion bid for Compaq Computer Corp. Former Director Walter B. Hewlett, who opposes the acquisition, sued the company March 28, saying executives coerced Deutsche Bank AG to switch at least 17 million votes in favor of the purchase. He also claims Fiorina and her deputies misled investors about the potential benefits of the buyout.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 5, 2002
BOSTON - Hewlett-Packard Co., the world's largest maker of personal computers, blamed lower demand as it reduced its sales estimates yesterday for the second half of its fiscal year, which ends Oct. 31. The forecast was the company's first since buying Compaq Computer Corp. Acquisition costs related to Compaq will be $2.6 billion, 86 percent more than forecast, because of higher severance expenses and $500 million to write off good will, said Jeffrey J. Clarke, Compaq's former chief financial officer and co-leader of the integration team.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 14, 2000
PALO ALTO, Calif. - Hewlett-Packard Co. reported fiscal fourth-quarter profit yesterday that missed forecasts. It also announced the end to discussions to buy PricewaterhouseCoopers LLC's consulting unit for as much as $18 billion. HP shares fell 13 percent. The No. 2 computer maker's profit from operations in the period that ended Oct. 31 rose to $826 million, or 41 cents a share, from $762 million, or 36 cents, a year earlier. Analysts expected 51 cents, the average estimate in a First Call/Thomson Financial poll.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 13, 2002
PALO ALTO, Calif. - Hewlett-Packard Co.'s management team will keep their jobs, except for Chairman and Chief Executive Carleton S. "Carly" Fiorina, if the $22.2 billion acquisition of Compaq Computer Corp. isn't approved, dissident director Walter B. Hewlett said yesterday. "All of the senior team will stay; they are all valuable," Hewlett said during a conference call with investors and analysts. "If the merger is defeated, I don't think [Fiorina] will have the credibility to lead this company."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 27, 2002
PALO ALTO, Calif. - Hewlett-Packard Co. Chief Executive Officer Carleton S. "Carly" Fiorina and Compaq Computer Corp. CEO Michael Capellas together might be paid more than $115 million if the two computer makers combine, director Walter B. Hewlett said. For weeks, Hewlett has been pressing the companies to disclose what top officials would be paid if shareholders approve HP's plan to buy Compaq. He says the pay packages may affect investors' votes on the deal. Yesterday, he released figures - two years' salary, bonuses and stock options - he said the companies considered when they announced the takeover agreement.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.