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By Jonas Shaffer and The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
Ravens safety Matt Elam will make $6.767 million over the course of his four-year rookie contract. He doesn't have to pay for the remaining 20 credits he needs to graduate from Florida. So, naturally, he seems to have gotten a job at the Gainesville, Fla., Finish Line while he completes his anthropology degree. Elam told the Ravens' team website that he was going back to school in part because of his mother. “One reason I'm going back is my mom. I promised her I was going to go back,” Elam said.
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SPORTS
By Jonathan Munshaw, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2014
Katie Hursey went to Syracuse to compete in track, but she was a triathlete by the time she left. The North Carroll alumna had known how to swim since she was young; all that remained was learning to race a bike. "From the start, the goal was to get her to qualify for the Olympics," said Chris Fox, Hursey's coach at Syracuse. During her senior year at Syracuse, USA Triathlon recruited Hursey to begin training for the Olympics, seeing how strong a runner she was. Hursey, who is from Hampstead but now moves often as part of her triathlon training, is continuing her journey to qualify for the Olympic team for the 2016 Games in Rio de Janeiro.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2013
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - With her wheelchair pushed aside, Erika Brannock gripped her walker and moved slowly toward the Thunder Road 5K finish line. Inside, her brother-in-law, Michael Gross, was bursting with pride to see Brannock walking with a prosthesis just seven months after the Boston Marathon bombing left the Towson preschool teacher gravely injured and her left leg amputated above the knee. But rather than focus on the seriousness of the moment, Gross asked Brannock, "Can you pick up the pace?"
SPORTS
By Jonathan Munshaw, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Dawn Perdue has been following racing for as long as she can remember. When she was 9, Perdue watched a drag race with her father. Immediately after seeing a jet dragster go down the track, she turned to her father and told him her dream was to race in one. Perdue moved closer to that dream on her 16th birthday, when her parents bought her her first racecar, a Ford Pinto. Although she grew up in Pennsylvania near the Maryland border, Perdue's racing career blossomed in Cecil County and at Maryland International Raceway at Budds Creek Motocross Park in Mechanicsville.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
City police and organizers of this weekend's Baltimore Running Festival say they are stepping up security after explosions shook the end of the Boston race this spring, joining other recent running events that have placed restrictions around the finish line. Baltimore's race comes as the busy fall marathon season enters full swing for the first time since the Boston attacks, and officials are trying to ensure public safety without detracting from the celebratory atmosphere that marks distance running events.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2011
Like many veteran marathoners, Bob Pohl always had an eye on the clock. "I used to tell my wife that if I drop in a race to stop my watch because I don't want to go to the hereafter with a bad time," he said. "The joke was funnier before. " The 55-year-old Marriottsville runner did collapse during a race. He was about 200 feet from the finish line of the Baltimore half-marathon on Oct. 15 when a blockage in a main artery stopped his blood from flowing - and his heart from beating.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2013
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - Somewhere near an eighth of a mile from the 5K finish line, Boston Marathon bombing survivor Erika Brannock stood up from her wheelchair.  Slowly, the 29-year-old Towson preschool teacher walked forward, with her sister and brother-in-law, Nicole and Michael Gross, by her side.  The moment came seven months since the bombing injured the Grosses and Brannock, whose left leg was amputated above the knee.  "I knew the...
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2010
They crossed the finish line yesterday in all manner of celebration. One runner did a cartwheel; another, a Michael Jackson moonwalk. One man did a Ray Lewis dance. Two women dressed as ballerinas stopped at the very end and did a grand plie. You'd have thought they would have been too pooped for such shenanigans, having just run as much as 26.2 miles. But, no, a number of the record 22,000 entrants in the 10 t h Baltimore Running Festival chose to close with personal antics that sent a buzz through the throng and which left their marks on the race.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg | February 15, 2008
What began as a way to shed extra pounds morphed quickly into a way of life for Tom Brown. The Glenelg resident began running 20 years ago, and it wasn't long before he got hooked on marathons. So it is fitting that Sunday, as he prepares to retire from long-distance racing, Brown plans to run the same course for his last race as he did for his first one -- Washington's Birthday Marathon in Greenbelt sponsored by the DC Road Runners Club. "When I realized it had been 20 years exactly since I had run this particular race and that this would be my 50th career marathon, it just seemed like this was the right time to end it," Brown, 57, said.
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,SUN STAFF | April 19, 2000
With the rain beating gently against the windows of her Ruxton home yesterday morning, it would have been a perfect opportunity for Lee DiPietro to sleep in and bask in the glow of a 24th-place finish among women in Monday's Boston Marathon. But DiPietro, 42, didn't think much about staying in bed. She went for an 8 a.m. swim at the Meadowbrook pool, relaxed a little in the hot tub and returned home to clean up the house and prepare for another day as the mother of two boys, 16 year-old Tim and 12 year-old Cryder, and the wife of a Baltimore insurance broker whose first name is also Lee. There was some time to celebrate as a family last night at a local restaurant, but it was back to a rigid training schedule for mom yesterday.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | June 2, 2014
The race "gun" sounded just after the clock on the Harford County Courthouse on Main Street in Bel Air began chiming 8 a.m. Sunday. By the time they had chimed eight times, hundreds of runners were headed down Main Street toward Broadway. And just after the clock finished chiming 8:15 a.m., the first runner, Dustin Meeker, 32, crossed the finish line in 15:35. The first female finisher and 18th overall was Melissa Tanner, 33, who crossed the finish line in 17:37. The 33rd annual run through the streets of Majors Choice and other neighborhoods of Bel Air drew 1,453 runners and 42 walkers.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2014
It's the one weekend in Baltimore when people riding large objects through land, water, sand and mud is a common sight. It's time again for American Visionary Art Museum 's Kinetic Sculpture Race. Kinetic veterans Melissa and Phillip Smith will be competing in the race, entering with their sculpture, Chessie, a front-wheel drive, rear steering, reverse trike that resembles a sea monster. "We build it with as little new material as possible and use lots of items we find on the roadside and construction Dumpsters, calling it 'sculpture treasure,'" said Melissa Smith, 35, of Catonsville.
SPORTS
By Nelson Coffin, For The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2014
Jody Petty said he could not bear to look as he rode Guts For Garters across the finish line in the 118th Maryland Hunt Cup on Saturday afternoon in sunny Glyndon. The Elkton resident said he knew the outcome would be too close to call, considering Imperial Way, guided by Bethany Baumgardner, was practically matching Guts For Garters stride for stride as they thundered down the stretch in the $75,000 steeplechase race. "I closed my eyes and didn't look up until I was well past the finish line," Petty said.
NEWS
By Catherine Rentz and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2014
Lynne Douglas stood frozen some 100 yards shy of the finish line at the Boston Marathon when the second bomb exploded, bringing last year's race to an abrupt and chaotic end. Today, the Columbia woman will run to overcome that moment. "We're running not to forget, but to replace the terror with a happy experience," said Douglas, 58. Douglas, whose leg was bruised by shrapnel, had expected the 2013 race to be her last marathon, the apex of running years that had begun in her 20s. But like dozens of other Maryland runners, she wants to create a new memory in place of the images of fallen runners, rising smoke and utter panic that defined last year's event.
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2014
Anyone who has competed in a road race knows that extra police and security are as much a part of the event as water stops and cheering spectators. But the last time John Gilligan ran the Boston Marathon in 2012 - a year before two bombs exploded near the finish line and changed the racing landscape - he didn't take notice of law enforcement. "I don't remember any security. You didn't think about it," said Gilligan, a 46-year-old Towson resident. "It didn't occur to anybody. You just hopped on the buses … You [could]
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2014
Qualifying for the Boston Marathon was not on Michelle Hollingsworth's radar when she broke into a jog at the start of the Marine Corps Marathon in 2012, but it sure was 3 hours and 36 minutes later. The 47-year-old hadn't expected to cross the finish line in Rosslyn, Va., so quickly, fast enough to qualify for the prestigious 26.2-mile race that begins in Hopkinton and ends on Boylston Street in Boston. The disappointment came later, when she found that registration had closed for the 2013 Boston Marathon.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2013
Somewhere on a lonely road in Kansas, about halfway through his 2,989.5-mile bicycle trek across the United States, Christoph Strasser, a 30-year-old former bike messenger, made a decision. He wouldn't simply win the Race Across America, the famously grueling coast-to-coast ultra-marathon cycling competition now in its 32nd year. He would break its long-standing record for speed. When he crossed the finish line Wednesday at Annapolis City Dock, grimacing and holding high the red-and-white flag of his native Austria, Strasser achieved both goals.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
When Erika Brannock was a guest of the Orioles during a game at Camden Yards last June, she was still in a wheelchair but vowed to return in 2014 to throw out a first pitch before a game. Less than a year after the 29-year-old Brannock lost her left leg in the Boston Marathon bombings, the Towson preschool teacher is now walking with prosthesis. Before the Orioles' game vs. the Red Sox on Thusday -- with the aid of a walker -- she threw out the first pitch to her favorite Oriole, first baseman Chris Davis.
SPORTS
By Jonas Shaffer and The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
Ravens safety Matt Elam will make $6.767 million over the course of his four-year rookie contract. He doesn't have to pay for the remaining 20 credits he needs to graduate from Florida. So, naturally, he seems to have gotten a job at the Gainesville, Fla., Finish Line while he completes his anthropology degree. Elam told the Ravens' team website that he was going back to school in part because of his mother. “One reason I'm going back is my mom. I promised her I was going to go back,” Elam said.
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