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NEWS
May 9, 2004
By the time a baby is three days old, it can tell its mother's voice from those of others. -- Reader's Digest Facts at Your Fingertips
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2012
Colleen Wilson of Ellicott City became the first person to enroll in the University of Maryland, College Park's new meteorology degree program a year ago. Now she's embarking on research with some of the nation's top weather watchers. The program and the opportunity for Wilson came about because the new home for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Center for Weather and Climate Prediction is a couple of miles down the road from the university's main campus. About 800 NOAA workers moved from an aged facility in Camp Springs to a sparkling metal-and-glass building at the university's budding research park.
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NEWS
By Devon Spurgeon and Devon Spurgeon,SUN STAFF | July 15, 1999
Black leather gloves have not been this controversial since O. J. Simpson was on trial.As part of a campaign to make his officers appear kinder and gentler, Anne Arundel County Police Chief P. Thomas Shanahan has decreed that black gloves are not to be worn except in inclement weather or for personal protection in hazardous situations.Anne Arundel is the first department in the state and one of the few in the nation to ban black leather gloves, according to law enforcement officials interviewed yesterday.
SPORTS
By Sam Farmer, Tribune Newspapers | January 31, 2011
Jed York faces quite a task. As president of the 49ers, the franchise his family owns, York has the challenge of coming up with a state-of-the-art stadium design for perhaps the world's most technologically discerning fan base — in the heart of Silicon Valley. Set aside the difficulty of actually getting a stadium constructed in California and consider the approach of the 29-year-old York, who envisions a venue that satisfies old-line fans and those from his plugged-in generation.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt | December 28, 1997
TO MY MIND, ONE of the most charming classical music programs is National Public Radio's "Performance Today," with host Martin Goldsmith. Among the show's many delights is a weekly commentary titled, appropriately enough, "Coming to Terms."The segment features author and musician Miles Hoffman, who chats knowledgeably about musical terminology and concepts.For listeners who don't instantly know what expressions like "adagio ma non troppo" mean (slow, but not too slow), Hoffman's commentary is a painless alternative to a college-level music appreciation course, served up in bite-sized pieces.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and By Maria Blackburn,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 15, 2004
So you have yet to get away for that spa vacation you've been craving. No worries. With a handful of products, you can create a spa in your own home. Sure, there won't be any 25-mile pre-dawn hikes. And we won't be trying to pass off two blueberries and a no-fat tortilla as dinner. But it will give you an opportunity to sit down, relax and give your bod the TLC it needs. Did someone say dimples? Your vows to work out 12 times a week and swear off potato chips forever didn't work. And as a result, your thighs are looking a tad too dimply for your taste.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Jennifer McMenamin and Julie Scharper and Jennifer McMenamin,Sun reporters | December 1, 2006
A Hampden woman met a man through Myspace.com, then disappeared after their first date. Police zeroed in on a suspect through cell phone records and eventually realized that a portion of the fatal beating was recorded on her voice mail. In a taped confession to police, the man described the grisly steps he took to disguise his victim's identity -- and explained that he learned how to cover his tracks, in part, from a popular television cop drama. Such shows as CSI: Crime Scene Investigation promise fiction ripped from the headlines, but the case unfurling this week in a Baltimore County courtroom seems to be an instance of crime following television's lead.
NEWS
By Marilyn McCraven | October 8, 1993
NOW that Chicago Bulls great Michael Jordan has decided to sit on the sidelines, let me suggest how Mr. NBA should spend his time:Turn all of that mournful rage over his father's violent and untimely death and his hounding by the media into a powerful force for leading America's urban youth out of the despair and hopelessness that result in self-destructive behavior.Mr. Jordan may ask, "Why me? Why not Magic or someone else?"First, in an age when there are few genuine heroes on or off the athletic fields and courts, Michael Jordan, probably the world's best-known athlete, is uniquely capable of leading all Americans in an urban revolution.
NEWS
By Peg Adamarczyk and Peg Adamarczyk,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 1, 1997
IT WAS a subject I had avoided discussing with my teen-age daughter since May.Our talk back then was blessedly quiet and brief for a change, and I couldn't see risking a confrontation. But when the school newsletter arrived in the mail this week, I knew I was in for it. There was the newly adopted school dress code, all spelled out.No clothing, hats, jewelry, book bags, or other personal items that promote or mention drugs, alcohol or tobacco. No "Big Johnson" or "Coed Naked" whatever T-shirts.
NEWS
By Steve Almond | March 31, 2010
When I first encountered iTunes, the wildly popular music app that allows fans to compile their own digital library, I was agog. After 20 years of amassing music, I had more than 4,000 albums, most of them stacked precariously in my basement. The more I used iTunes, the more slavish my devotion grew. If I wanted to play a particular song, I no longer had to go hunting through those stacks. I just clicked a button. If I wanted to make a mixed CD -- a process that had taken me hours, particularly in the cassette era -- I had only to create a new playlist.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,liz.atwood@baltsun.com | February 12, 2009
Spring is still weeks away, but winter-weary gardeners can satisfy their desire to get their hands dirty and watch things grow by capturing a little nature under glass. A terrarium brings a miniature garden to your desk or tabletop with minimal effort, says Tovah Martin, author of The New Terrarium, a how-to from Clarkson Potter due out Feb. 24. "It's so easy. It's one of the easiest ways to indoor garden besides growing succulents and forgetting them entirely," she says. Picture a petit woodland glen on your coffee table with moss, ferns and ivy nestled around a pine cone.
NEWS
By Brad Schleicher and Brad Schleicher,Sun Staff | January 6, 2008
Nearly two hundred years ago President Thomas Jefferson sent explorers Lewis and Clark west, following the Mississippi and other rivers to the edge of the Rocky Mountains and then on to the Pacific Coast. The purpose was to map a path through the Louisiana Territory, the vast tract the United States had purchased from France. In that era and the years that followed, maps were powerful tools created to economically exploit the lands they described. Good maps produced significant wealth.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,sun reporter | November 30, 2007
The work has been painstaking, with years spent poring over old maps, land records and photographs or sifting through piles of dirt for shards of dishes or tools. Now the efforts of archaeologists and preservationists in Annapolis have been compiled in a new project that marries history and technology: a single, interactive Web site that will offer the public unprecedented views of the city's Colonial past. The Annapolis collection, called Preservation Search, catalogs only a fraction of the 2,000 structures in the city's historic district, but is one of the most comprehensive online collections of historic records of a single jurisdiction, said Mark P. Leone, a University of Maryland, College Park anthropology professor and the force behind the Archaeology in Annapolis digs.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Jennifer McMenamin and Julie Scharper and Jennifer McMenamin,Sun reporters | December 1, 2006
A Hampden woman met a man through Myspace.com, then disappeared after their first date. Police zeroed in on a suspect through cell phone records and eventually realized that a portion of the fatal beating was recorded on her voice mail. In a taped confession to police, the man described the grisly steps he took to disguise his victim's identity -- and explained that he learned how to cover his tracks, in part, from a popular television cop drama. Such shows as CSI: Crime Scene Investigation promise fiction ripped from the headlines, but the case unfurling this week in a Baltimore County courtroom seems to be an instance of crime following television's lead.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | September 20, 2006
The wonder that is Leon Fleisher chalks up yet another remarkable achievement with yesterday's release of what is only his second recording of two-hand piano music in more than four decades. Leon Fleisher: The Journey, from Vanguard Classics, offers renewed evidence that, at 78, the Baltimore-based keyboard artist keeps pushing back the twilight of his career to enjoy another gratifying day in the sun. Denied the full use of his right hand in 1964 due to a neurological disorder called dystonia, Fleisher has in recent years returned to ambidexterity, thanks to injections of Botox.
BUSINESS
By John Schmeltzer and John Schmeltzer,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 23, 2005
Wendy's International Inc. said yesterday that it will focus on rebuilding its reputation after a San Jose, Calif., woman who claimed she found a fingertip in a bowl of chili she ordered has been charged with attempted theft. But one crisis management expert said he believed that the fast food chain was doing too little to heal its reputation. The Columbus, Ohio-based hamburger chain said it was "thrilled" and "vindicated that an arrest had been made." Las Vegas police were holding 39-year-old Anna Ayala without bail pending an extradition hearing Tuesday on a charge of attempted grand larceny.
NEWS
By Erika Hobbs and Erika Hobbs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 3, 2004
Push the kids away from the video games, mom and dad. It's your turn now. And don't worry. Playing the latest crop of videos won't make you go soft around the middle - they could make you leaner and stronger. Thanks to software developers who have crafted slick, new animated video exercise programs for adults as well as youthful gamers, the living room is more than ever a great place to work out. Unlike traditional VCR and DVD workouts, which feature humans, these new videos offer virtual personal trainers, dance instructors and even meditation, all personalized and easy to use. The video workouts can be popped into Microsoft's XBox, Sony's PlayStation and, in many cases, a personal computer.
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