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Finding Nemo

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By Omar L. Gallaga and Omar L. Gallaga,COX NEWS SERVICE | November 6, 2003
If you're a parent, it's likely that the disc you'll have sitting in your DVD player for at least the next month will be Finding Nemo, a two-DVD set that hit stores Tuesday. The good news is that the film (and its multitude of shimmery DVD extras) is a joy. The Pixar fish film has become, since its summer release, the highest-grossing animated film in history and garnered some of the best critical cartoon hosannas since ... well, since Pixar's last film, Monsters, Inc. At the box office, Finding Nemo surpassed The Lion King, which reached DVD shelves last month.
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February 19, 2009
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FEATURES
By Lauren Rosenblum and Lauren Rosenblum,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2003
Movies are famous for using product tie-ins to attract viewer interest and propel the momentum of a film. Star Wars, Toy Story and Pokemon are just a few that drove kids crazy. Finding Nemo, Disney and Pixar's latest animated film, is no different, hyping the movie with toys for all ages. Nemo-themed toys, created by Hasbro, run the gamut, from stuffed animals and board games to bath toys and candy. But there's one thing that's different about the Nemo craze: a tie-in that executives at Hasbro, Disney and Pixar might not have anticipated.
TRAVEL
By Richard P. Carpenter and Richard P. Carpenter,Boston Globe | August 5, 2007
There's always something new in the Golden State of California. Here are some of its latest attractions for children and adults: At Disneyland in Anaheim, the just-opened Finding Nemo Submarine Voyage combines something old with something new. The eight submarines of Disneyland's original Submarine Voyage now prowl beneath the seas while surrounded by the fishy stars of the Finding Nemo movie. Single-day tickets to Disneyland are $63 for ages 10 and older, $53 for those younger. The average daily price drops with a multiday ticket.
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,sun reporter | January 29, 2007
JUST AS A LITTLE GIRL NAMED VIRGINIA DID with her questions about Santa Claus, Lawrence Silberman chose a letter to the editor to express his misgivings about something he found hard to believe - the first weight loss medicine for dogs was hitting the market. That "Slentrol" - a new tool to fight canine obesity - had won federal government approval struck Silberman, of Burtonsville, as silly. A far simpler course, it seemed to him, would be to feed your dog less. ONLINE See video of the dog caught in the act, with a camera that filmed through the night, at baltimoresun.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 30, 2003
Only an "m" separates Neo, the hero of The Matrix Reloaded, and Nemo, the hero of Finding Nemo, but an ocean of vitality and exuberance divides the Matrix sequel from the Pixar studio's latest work of computer-animation genius. Finding Nemo marks the first time that a Pixar team has tackled the murdered-parent, threatened-child scenario of borderline maudlin Disney classics such as Bambi. But co-director/co-writer Andrew Stanton has the wit to parallel the stories of a motherless clownfish, Nemo, and his over-protective father, Marlin, and to poke fun at familial bonds even as he celebrates them.
FEATURES
By Jay Boyar and Jay Boyar,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 23, 2003
Can a fish use a phone? With Alexander Gould on the line, you do start to form that impression. The 9-year-old's voice sounds exactly as it does when he's speaking for Nemo, the little clown fish in the animated hit Finding Nemo. It's an endearing voice but not sickly sweet, crystal clear and yet not without the occasional youthful stumble. Asked about his favorite scene to perform, Alexander is ready with an answer: It's the scene in which other fish use a plant to pull the trapped Nemo out of an aquarium filter.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ashley Burrell | October 21, 2004
Halloween Toy Ride Be a part of the spectacle during a police-escorted ride down Pulaski Highway with more than 1,000 toy-bearing bikers from across the Baltimore region. During the Kennedy Krieger Institute's sixth annual Halloween Toy Ride, children from the institute will put on a skit and proceed to dress in their best witch, goblin and ghost attire. Children and parents will flaunt their costumes while trick-or-treating and playing games with the bikers. Participants are encouraged to donate and deliver a new un-wrapped, nonviolent toy or contribution.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 1, 2004
Shark Tale is Finding Nemo with bigger-name stars, far less heart and, the guess here is, about one-third the staying power. The movie starts off with the alternating tales of Oscar (voice of Will Smith), a cleaner wrasse (a small fish that keeps coral reefs tidy by eating leftover food off bigger fish) who desperately wants to live the high life, and Lenny (Jack Black), a vegetarian shark who has the misfortune of being the son of a shark-Mafia don. Oscar is one of those fish - you know the kind - always shooting off their big mouths, but never making anything of themselves.
BUSINESS
By Greg Hernandez and Greg Hernandez,LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS | May 27, 2003
LOS ANGELES - Membership in the movie industry's exclusive $100 million club got off to a slow start this year with just four 2003 releases crossing that box office milestone through the end of April. But the clubhouse will soon be more crowded, with Hollywood poised to possibly double the record for the number of movies released in a single month that reach the benchmark. Never before have more than three films released in the same month made $100 million or more. "If we have four, it will definitely be a record - and we should have at least five," said Brandon Gray, president of the box office tracking firm Box Office Mojo.
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,sun reporter | January 29, 2007
JUST AS A LITTLE GIRL NAMED VIRGINIA DID with her questions about Santa Claus, Lawrence Silberman chose a letter to the editor to express his misgivings about something he found hard to believe - the first weight loss medicine for dogs was hitting the market. That "Slentrol" - a new tool to fight canine obesity - had won federal government approval struck Silberman, of Burtonsville, as silly. A far simpler course, it seemed to him, would be to feed your dog less. ONLINE See video of the dog caught in the act, with a camera that filmed through the night, at baltimoresun.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | January 27, 2006
Animation has always been a tip-of-the-iceberg art in which seconds of finished work represent weeks of thought and labor. Ever since he put Toy Story into production, John Lasseter, the reigning genius at Pixar and the new chief of Disney animation, has infused that arduous process with joy and a love for movie heritage - even as he's taken cartooning (in the words of Toy Story's Buzz Lightyear) "to infinity and beyond." For anyone who's followed Pixar closely, everything Lasseter has been saying in the wake of Pixar's sale to Disney - about the culture of Pixar being more important than its economics - rings as true as a church bell.
BUSINESS
By CLAUDIA ELLER AND KIM CHRISTENSEN and CLAUDIA ELLER AND KIM CHRISTENSEN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 25, 2006
LOS ANGELES -- The Walt Disney Co. formally announced yesterday an agreement to buy industry pioneer Pixar Animation Studios, sending a clear signal it intends to fix its ailing animation unit while aggressively pursuing a strategy to be at the forefront of Hollywood's digital future. The $7.4 billion all-stock deal aims to re-establish a tradition of creative and technological innovation that began with founder Walt Disney 80 years ago. It allies Disney Chief Executive Officer Robert A. Iger with Pixar Chairman Steven P. Jobs, the co-founder and head of Apple Computer Co., whose iTunes technology and other innovations changed the way people consume entertainment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ashley Burrell | October 21, 2004
Halloween Toy Ride Be a part of the spectacle during a police-escorted ride down Pulaski Highway with more than 1,000 toy-bearing bikers from across the Baltimore region. During the Kennedy Krieger Institute's sixth annual Halloween Toy Ride, children from the institute will put on a skit and proceed to dress in their best witch, goblin and ghost attire. Children and parents will flaunt their costumes while trick-or-treating and playing games with the bikers. Participants are encouraged to donate and deliver a new un-wrapped, nonviolent toy or contribution.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 1, 2004
Shark Tale is Finding Nemo with bigger-name stars, far less heart and, the guess here is, about one-third the staying power. The movie starts off with the alternating tales of Oscar (voice of Will Smith), a cleaner wrasse (a small fish that keeps coral reefs tidy by eating leftover food off bigger fish) who desperately wants to live the high life, and Lenny (Jack Black), a vegetarian shark who has the misfortune of being the son of a shark-Mafia don. Oscar is one of those fish - you know the kind - always shooting off their big mouths, but never making anything of themselves.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Langberg and Mike Langberg,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 8, 2004
Here's something my 3-year-old daughter Sara will have a hard time remembering when she's in high school: movies recorded on tape and disc for home viewing, bought or rented from stores or delivered by mail. Sara will give me one of those adolescent "Oh, Dad, you dinosaur" looks when I try to tell her that high-definition movies weren't always available on demand through an ultrahigh-speed Internet connection for download in three minutes. Then she'll pop her 1-ounce cell phone into her ear and demand the keys to the family hover-car.
TRAVEL
By Richard P. Carpenter and Richard P. Carpenter,Boston Globe | August 5, 2007
There's always something new in the Golden State of California. Here are some of its latest attractions for children and adults: At Disneyland in Anaheim, the just-opened Finding Nemo Submarine Voyage combines something old with something new. The eight submarines of Disneyland's original Submarine Voyage now prowl beneath the seas while surrounded by the fishy stars of the Finding Nemo movie. Single-day tickets to Disneyland are $63 for ages 10 and older, $53 for those younger. The average daily price drops with a multiday ticket.
FEATURES
By John Horn and John Horn,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 1, 2004
They united studios - and divided them. They not only rescued old television shows from late-night obscurity but also became the engine driving show-business profits. And they are changing the way movies are made, both for better and worse. Altogether, 2003 was a year when DVDs ate Hollywood. A bigger phenomenon than even Hollywood's obsession with franchise films like The Lord of the Rings, DVDs enjoyed staggering domestic sales growth, up 46 percent to a projected $12.3 billion in 2003, according to Adams Media Research.
FEATURES
By John Horn and John Horn,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 1, 2004
They united studios - and divided them. They not only rescued old television shows from late-night obscurity but also became the engine driving show-business profits. And they are changing the way movies are made, both for better and worse. Altogether, 2003 was a year when DVDs ate Hollywood. A bigger phenomenon than even Hollywood's obsession with franchise films like The Lord of the Rings, DVDs enjoyed staggering domestic sales growth, up 46 percent to a projected $12.3 billion in 2003, according to Adams Media Research.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Omar L. Gallaga and Omar L. Gallaga,COX NEWS SERVICE | November 6, 2003
If you're a parent, it's likely that the disc you'll have sitting in your DVD player for at least the next month will be Finding Nemo, a two-DVD set that hit stores Tuesday. The good news is that the film (and its multitude of shimmery DVD extras) is a joy. The Pixar fish film has become, since its summer release, the highest-grossing animated film in history and garnered some of the best critical cartoon hosannas since ... well, since Pixar's last film, Monsters, Inc. At the box office, Finding Nemo surpassed The Lion King, which reached DVD shelves last month.
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