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Finding A Job

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BUSINESS
By Joyce Lain Kennedy and Joyce Lain Kennedy,Sun Features | November 4, 1991
Dear Joyce: I have just noticed your column and find it very helpful. I never noticed it before because I was never without a job. Before this I got every job I ever applied for. But I'm running into a brick wall no matter where I turn. What suggestions have you? -- K.I.P.My mail is full of letters like yours."Forget about finding a job that is meaningful, I need a job that means I will keep my house.""A counselor told me to expect a month of job hunting for each $10,000 of annual income -- or five months for $50,000.
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NEWS
By Mitzi Perdue | July 29, 2013
"Thank you for your service" is, today, an oft-repeated mantra, uttered after encountering a member of the nation's armed forces or - if recognized - a veteran of past and present wars. And rightly so. Typically, a highlight of the 2013 All-Star Major League baseball game on July 16 was a solemn tribute to the nation's military. Some 1.5 million U.S. servicemen and women are currently employed in war zones worldwide, while the number of veterans of the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan has now reached 2.5 million.
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BUSINESS
By Joyce Lain Kennedy and Joyce Lain Kennedy,Sun Features Inc | April 20, 1992
Dear Joyce: I have been a very successful corporate woman right up until yesterday when I was told my position is being eliminated, and, in fact, most of my department is being severed. I have an MBA from a top school, have held a managerial job for the past 10 years and have often referred my direct reports to your column. I never thought it would be a resource for me. But here I am, caught in a cutback and being offered out placement. Several friends who have been through out placement have expressed disappointment in the services.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella | lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | April 5, 2010
W hile on active duty in Iraq, Matthew Ellersick started job hunting online, planning his transition to civilian life. Since returning from a six-month deployment in February, the Army National Guard intelligence analyst, who has a master's degree in marketing, has traveled a circuit of job fairs from Tampa, Fla., to Philadelphia with no luck. "When I came back, the economy was a lot worse than when I left," said Ellersick during a recent job fair in Baltimore, a chance to come face-to-face with employers after many companies he contacted had directed him to apply online.
NEWS
February 23, 2005
Today, The Sun introduces Working, a weekly section detailing careers, workplace trends and tips on finding a job. Other features in our new coverage include area business promotions, profiles of local workers on the job and a question-and-answer session with experts. Classified advertising also has moved to the Working section and will appear there each Wednesday.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2005
The Sun soon will launch Working, a weekly section detailing careers and offering tips on finding a job. One feature will include a question-and-answer session with workplace experts responding to reader inquiries. Please send your question along with name, address and daytime telephone number to Working; on the Web at www.baltimoresun. com/working; by e-mail at working@baltsun.com; by fax: 410-783-2517; or by mail: The Baltimore Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore 21278.
BUSINESS
January 12, 2005
The Sun soon will launch Working, a weekly section detailing careers and offering tips on finding a job. One feature will include recently promoted business people. Readers are encouraged to submit items. Please send the name of the person promoted, the job title, the company's name, location and telephone number. Submissions can be made to Business People; on the Web at www.baltimoresun. com/working; by e-mail at working@baltsun.com; by fax: 410-783-2517; or by mail: The Baltimore Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore 21278.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2005
The Sun soon will launch Working, a weekly section detailing careers and offering tips on finding a job. One feature will include area job fairs and career resources. Readers are encouraged to submit items. Please send the date, time and location of an event, any cost or registration associated with attending and a contact name and telephone number. Submissions can be made to Job Calendar; on the Web at www.baltimoresun.com/working; by e-mail at working@baltsun.com; by fax, 410-783-2517; or by mail, The Baltimore Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore 21278.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | March 5, 1994
Maryland's unemployment rate jumped sharply in January, as layoffs from Christmas-season jobs and the cold winter weather pushed the state jobless rate to 6.4 percent from December's 5.8 percent.State officials said unemployment rose by 16,430 people in January, bringing the total out of work in Maryland to more than 170,000 workers.But a bright side in the unemployment rate, they said, is that fewer workers than normal left the work force after giving up hope of finding a job soon. When people stop looking for work, they are no longer counted in the unemployment figures.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2003
Baltimore County officials said yesterday that they will hire counselors and open a job-placement center to help displaced Bethlehem Steel Corp. workers. Bethlehem's Sparrows Point plant will be downsized as part of a deal by rival International Steel Group Inc. to buy Bethlehem Steel. It is unclear how many of the 3,300 workers at Sparrows Point will lose their jobs, but county officials said they will help all that they can. "No matter what the number is that lose their jobs, it's going to have a significant impact on the individual, on the family and on the community," said Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. The county's efforts will be financed with federal funds.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | February 18, 2010
I listen to these stories -- I've heard hundreds over the years -- and some are more convincing than others, and some, like Shelton Brown's, come christened with so much God, you're in no position to argue. Four years ago, Mr. Brown was selling crack and carrying a 9 mm handgun. Today he's on home detention and thanking God for the time he spent in prison, saying it was God who changed his life. It's what he fervently believes. If it keeps Shelton Brown from returning to his old ways, getting rearrested and taking up space -- at $26,000 a year -- in a Maryland prison, then I say leave it alone, and God be praised.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,julie.scharper@baltsun.com | January 12, 2009
When Leslie Faison started a master's program in criminal justice, it seemed like a good idea to quit work and attend school full time. She wanted to spend more time with her young daughter and, with the economy doing well, finding another job did not sound very difficult. Yesterday, looking radiant in her cap and gown at a University of Baltimore graduation ceremony, Faison said that she wished that she had hung on to her job and studied part time. She's having a hard time finding a job in the grim economic climate - many of the agencies to which she has applied are under a hiring freeze, and the others are flooded with applicants.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | December 21, 2008
No one - let alone a governor, like Martin O'Malley, who hopes to win a second term - finds joy in a time of economic distress. At the moment, voters are probably cutting him some slack; he's not the big-bonus Wall Street master of the universe. He's just dealing with the mess they are partially responsible for making. But he has to act as if the responsibility was his alone. You get the feeling that governors in general are waiting for Washington - specifically, President-elect Barack Obama - to bail them out. Even a crisis like this one could bring opportunity.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,sun reporter | March 25, 2007
Chad Shrodes got his wish when he was elected to the Harford County Council, but it cost him his job. While the Republican boasted that his experience as a county planner would help him as a councilman, conflict of interest rules prohibited him from holding both positions. So when he was sworn in at the beginning of the year as an elected official, he became temporarily unemployed. For the past three months, Shrodes has used the free time to delve into concerns lodged by residents in his district, which stretches from Jarrettsville to Dublin.
BUSINESS
By Janet Kidd Stewart and Janet Kidd Stewart,Tribune Media Services | September 3, 2006
Robyn Michaels is in a tough spot. She's looking for work, spends more than she takes in and is coming up on retirement. But, experts said, the situation is not hopeless. When her dog-grooming business slowed last spring after eight successful years, Michaels first tried to downsize her 1,700- square-foot shop, Northshore Clippers, into smaller quarters. But when she couldn't find a smaller rental space that would allow pet traffic, she started to rethink her entire financial picture.
NEWS
By ADELLE WALDMAN and ADELLE WALDMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 8, 2006
Sean Krus would be the first to say he has a good job. Krus, 27, is a program support assistant for the Center for Social Organization of Schools, a nonprofit organization run by the Johns Hopkins University. He likes his co-workers, finds the work reasonably interesting and likes the fact that the organization works with inner-city schools. Plus, his salary enables him to live comfortably in Hampden, and the benefits are good. Yet Krus - a guitar player who won a music scholarship to Towson University and has a bachelor's degree in psychology - wonders if there isn't some career out there that he'd really love, one that wouldn't feel like work.
NEWS
By Michael A. Conte | September 7, 1998
EACH LABOR DAY America celebrates its progress as a great provider. Average real family income has risen by almost one percent a year for the past generation. Since World War II, the unemployment rate has risen above 8 percent for two periods -- for a couple months in 1975 and late 1981 through December 1983. This country's record of economic prosperity is unparalleled in the world.Some Eastern Europeans jokingly refer to the United States as the "wild west" because of our commitment to freedom in hiring and firing.
NEWS
September 28, 2005
Numbers--Hurricane Katrina has accounted for 214,000 jobless claims so far, the U.S. Labor Department said last week. Tip of the Week: Look inside before you look for work Finding a job that brings fulfillment starts with the question: Who am I? Knowing the answer to this question will reveal one's particular gifts, skills and talents. Because events in our lives change, we should periodically take stock of what matters to us. As humans we evolve, yet we may not notice until we feel discomfort or even pain, boredom or fear.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | July 14, 2005
IF THE BALTIMORE City Council approves the new, city-owned $305 million downtown convention center hotel, the O'Malley administration should put in place a smartly coordinated, two-year work force development plan to turn some of the city's most chronically unemployed adults into a proud, drug-clean and well-trained staff for the facility. What the city needs is a deep reach into its underclass with between 300 and 400 jobs to Baltimoreans who show genuine willingness to change and get into the mainstream.
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