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By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Actor Woody Harrelson, known for his characters in the TV show "Cheers" and movies such as "No Country for Old Men" and "The Hunger Games," has a new role: landlord of Fells Point's Inn at the Black Olive. The celebrity joined John "Jack" Dwyer, chairman of the family of Capital Funding companies in Baltimore, in a 50-50 venture to purchase the property for $4.5 million in January after being connected by Dimitris Spiliadis, whose family opened the 12-room hotel in 2011 and lost it to foreclosure last summer.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | October 8, 2014
Merrill Lynch made business page headlines this year by appointing Baltimore County native Cynthia Hutchins to the newly created post of director of financial gerontology. Ms. Hutchins is charged with teaching the company's nearly 14,000 financial advisers how to talk to baby boomer clients about more than stocks and bonds - to help those planning to end their working lives understand the complexities and the realities of retiring. It is a smart move. More than 42 percent of the average financial advisor's client base is of baby boomer age, and another 36 percent is older than 67. It helps if you understand what they are experiencing.
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SPORTS
Baltimore Sun reporter | September 15, 2011
Financier and Vote Yes for Love provided a thrilling finish to Wednesday's third race at Laurel Park, hitting the wire together in a dead heat. Vote Yes for Love, who was winless in nine previous starts, appeared to be the winner of the $10,000 maiden claimer at the sixteenth pole, but Financier loomed on the outside and got a nose in front a few strides before the finish line. Then it turned into a bob of heads with the duo crossing the line simultaneously. Vote Yes for Love, a 3-year-old son of Not For Love trained by Yolonda King and ridden by Xavier Perez, paid $3.40 to win. Financier paid $2.20 as the 7-10 betting favorite.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Frank Fried was born a few months before the Orioles won their last World Series, so the 31-year-old mechanical engineer's memories of his favorite baseball team are mostly painful. Like many fans, Fried believes that the drought will end this month, a result that would not only thrill the city but also boost the local economy. A partial season-ticket holder, Fried will be at Camden Yards for Thursday's Game 1 of the American League Division Series against the Detroit Tigers, as he was nearly three dozen times during a regular season when the Orioles were one of the best teams in baseball.
NEWS
By Hal Piper and Hal Piper,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2000
History is proving kinder to J. Pierpont Morgan than many of his contemporaries were. Reviled in his time as the prototypical plutocrat, Morgan has been rediscovered as the architect of the 19th-century American industrial expansion and a patriot attentive to the call of duty. Last week, the integrity and prestige of the namesake J. P. Morgan & Co. bank was the focus of much of the commentary that attended the announcement that the bank would be taken over by Chase Manhattan Corp. to create an institution valued at more than $96 billion.
NEWS
July 2, 2006
The financier announced that he intended to give the bulk of his $44 billion personal fortune to the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. "A very rich person should leave his kids enough to do anything, but not enough to do nothing." Warren Buffett
NEWS
January 28, 2010
In the State of the Union speech, President Obama celebrated the House of Representatives for passing legislation to rein in the reckless practices we've seen on Wall Street. He then turned to the Senate and urged them to get a good bill to his desk immediately. Passing Wall Street reform through the Senate will not be easy. According to Bloomberg News reports, more than 1,400 bank lobbyists are now working the halls of Congress. That's more than three lobbyists for every member of Congress, or fourteen lobbyists for every senator.
NEWS
July 23, 2010
I read your paper every day and have been for many years. I enjoy most of it from the front section to the comics. But there's something missing for many people. For all the people I know, a very high percentage own stocks in the NYSE and NASDAQ, or a mutual fund. I think you should bring back and print these markets, if only one day a week or in the Sunday paper. Also, possibly a listing of where to go for the best deal in a money market account for investing. I think if you did a survey, it would be a safe bet that you would have a substantial increase in your circulation.
NEWS
By Thomas F. Schaller | April 20, 2010
Since his February 2009 high-water mark of nearly 80 percent, President Barack Obama has seen his approval ratings drop about 30 points. If approval ratings are the primary currency of a president's political capital, that's a lot of money down the drain. Strip away any effects from how he handled two inherited wars, or culture war issues like abortion, and what largely accounts for Mr. Obama's changing fortunes are his actions on one policy and his inaction on another. The action came hot and heavy, if slow and unsteady, on health care reform.
NEWS
September 11, 2011
While it's important to continue the conversation of what innovations can improve teaching and learning in our schools over the long term ("Staying ahead of the game," Sept. 7), we must make sure that this conversation includes the immediate school funding challenges that threaten our ability to maintain the quality of schools and school facilities that Marylanders have come to expect, let alone to implement ambitious new programs. Funding for our schools is under threat from several quarters.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Robert W. Weinhold Sr., a decorated Army Airborne Ranger in the Vietnam War who later worked for several financial institutions, died Monday at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center of kidney failure. He was 75. The son of Herman W. Weinhold, a textile millworker, and Mary Alice Weinhold, a homemaker, Robert Winway Weinhold was born and raised in Methuen, Mass., where he graduated in 1956 from Methuen High School. He enrolled at Norwich University in Northfield, Vt., where he was captain and quarterback for the university's football team.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2014
Jeanne Keen bustled in the door, black blazer over a dress shirt, a file folder with paperwork in her shoulder bag. If only she were walking into work. Then she would have a paycheck. A way to save her Dundalk rowhouse from foreclosure. A daily outlet for her need to do . This August morning, 361 days after her last at a paid job, she stopped by home to pick up her 24-year-old son - also looking for work - so they could drive to a job fair together. Her file folder was full of resumes.
NEWS
August 27, 2014
Baltimore's proposed Red Line passed a significant milestone this week with mixed results. The good news is that officials in Baltimore and Baltimore County pledged a combined $280 million to help build the 14-mile light rail project, less enthralling is that the total cost has risen a quarter-billion dollars to $2.9 billion. Critics will no doubt seize on the higher cost as a sign of incompetence, waste, poor planning or the usual brickbats thrown at taxpayer-financed projects of all kinds.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | August 26, 2014
Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz ended the most recent campaign finance reporting period with just over $1 million in the bank. His Republican rival, George Harman, reported just under $3,000. What the two have in common is that they both filed their reports well before Tuesday night's midnight deadline. This year's executive race was never expected to be particularly close, but Kamenetz'  roughly 333-1 advantage illustrates the power of incumbency in an increasingly Democratic-leaning county.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
William S. Jeffries, who rose from a clerk at Alex. Brown & Sons to managing director and partner in the venerable Baltimore financial firm, died Aug. 8 of complications from dementia at Arden Courts of Towson. The longtime Ruxton resident was 88. "Bill was the consummate professional and gentleman. He was boss, mentor, confidant and as the years passed, a wonderful lifelong friend to so many of us at Alex. Brown," said Mike Connelly, a retired managing director and partner at Alex.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
Morgan State University continues to have problems managing the largest federal research program in its history and has faced financial penalties from the organization that oversees the program, according to documents released this week. Mismanagement in the program known as GESTAR, or NASA's Goddard Earth Sciences Technology and Research, became public in June when The Baltimore Sun obtained a letter from the contractor overseeing the program that detailed "serious performance and financial deficiencies.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2010
Baltimore-based CitiFinancial, the consumer lending arm of financial giant Citigroup Inc., will be rebranded under a new name that sheds its corporate parent's Wall Street identity to reflect more Main Street roots. CitiFinancial's new name as OneMain Financial, announced Wednesday, comes after the company completed a reorganization as it continues to explore a sale. The restructuring involved closing 330 branches across the U.S., including six in Maryland, and creating a new network of servicing branches focused on helping existing customers with loan modifications.
NEWS
By Henry C. Lucas Jr | February 24, 2010
As someone who has spent many years working with the application, management and impact of information technology, I have been relieved to see that the myriad of articles on the causes of the financial crisis of the last 18 months have so far not blamed the computer. As the crisis unfolded, my first thought was that someone will use technology as the excuse for it. But if technology was not to blame for the crisis, what was the role of such things as computers, databases and telecommunications networks?
NEWS
July 30, 2014
Between the crises in the Middle East and Ukraine and the outbreak of Ebola in West Africa, it's difficult to get domestic news on the front page this week, let alone good news. But the improved finances of Medicare deserve the public's attention, particularly given that the much-maligned Affordable Care Act is involved. Here's the bottom line: Medicare paid out less in hospital benefits last year than it did the year before. This is a fantastic development because, according to projections contained in an annual report released Monday, it means that Medicare will have enough money to continue paying for the hospital care of the elderly and disabled through 2030, which is four years longer than the federal government estimated for the program just last year.
NEWS
Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2014
State officials said at a legislative briefing Thursday that their agencies must do more to flag financial mismanagement at group homes - problems similar to those that went unheeded at an Anne Arundel County facility where a 10-year-old disabled foster child died this month. Maryland's health and human resources secretaries appeared together before a joint committee of state lawmakers in Annapolis to answer questions about oversight of LifeLine, the operator of the group home where the boy died.
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