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By New York Times News Service $ | February 25, 1992
Financial World magazine moved yesterday to sever its relationship with Graef S. Crystal, who writes on executive pay issues for the magazine, because of complaints about hiscolumn.Geoffrey N. Smith, the magazine's editor, said Financial World had decided not to renew Mr. Crystal's contract when it expires in September.He said Mr. Crystal, a professor at the University of California Berkeley, would be allowed to submit one more column for publication, on a pre-approved topic, after the current issue, which just went to press.
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NEWS
November 26, 2013
The Sun's editorial ("JPMorgan's money is not enough, http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/opinion/editorial/bs-ed-jpmorgan-20131119%2C0%2C276037.story Nov. 19) is on target by saying the "Justice Department should push ahead with its criminal probe of JPMorgan to determine whether certain individuals should be prosecuted for wrongdoing. Recognizing that the $13 billion fine is significant, it's only two-thirds of JPMorgan's yearly profit of $21 billion and minuscule next to its $2.5 trillion worth.
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BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Financial WorldNew York Bureau | June 16, 1993
NEW YORK -- Currency wars and a record year for Wall Street firms helped boost the earnings of the Street's top dogs to stratospheric levels last year, according to a published report released yesterday.In its annual ranking of the financial community's top earners, Financial World placed investment guru George Soros in the top place with a record $650 million, beating junk bond king Michael Milken, who was estimated to have made $500 million in one year before being convicted in 1990 of conspiring to violate securities and tax laws.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | December 13, 2011
Wall Street is its own worst enemy. It should have welcomed new financial regulation as a means of restoring public trust. Instead, it's busily shredding new regulations and making the public more distrustful than ever. The Street's biggest lobbying groups have just filed a lawsuit against the Commodities Futures Trading Commission, seeking to overturn its new rule limiting speculative trading in food, oil and other commodities. The Street makes bundles from these bets, but they have raised costs for consumers.
BUSINESS
By Maria Mallory | January 24, 1991
Less than a year after Maryland's state management was judged best in the nation by the editors of Financial World magazine, Baltimore's fiscal managers also are making the grade.Baltimore earned a B+ overall grade for management acumen and financial stability in Financial World's soon-to-be-released "State of the Cities" survey.Using the data from a 12-page survey circulated among the financial managers of the nation's 30 most populous cities, the magazine assigned individual grades for each city's prowess in accounting, budgeting, infrastructure controls and performance evaluations.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer Marina Sarris of the Annapolis Bureau contributed to this story | April 23, 1992
An annual ranking that names the best financially managed states -- used as a marketing tool to attract out-of-state businesses -- shows Maryland slipped a notch to a still laudable fourth place this year.The salt in the wound, however, is that the state's toughest economic-development competitor, Virginia, moved ahead of Maryland into first place in Financial World magazine's third annual "State of the States" rankings.The magazine judges the states by accounting and financial reporting systems; program performance evaluations; bond ratings; revenue and spending estimates and other budgeting measures.
NEWS
November 26, 2013
The Sun's editorial ("JPMorgan's money is not enough, http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/opinion/editorial/bs-ed-jpmorgan-20131119%2C0%2C276037.story Nov. 19) is on target by saying the "Justice Department should push ahead with its criminal probe of JPMorgan to determine whether certain individuals should be prosecuted for wrongdoing. Recognizing that the $13 billion fine is significant, it's only two-thirds of JPMorgan's yearly profit of $21 billion and minuscule next to its $2.5 trillion worth.
NEWS
By JOHN B HOLWAY | March 12, 1995
Back when I was a sophomore in college taking Economics 101, I was taught that if a businessman buys a widget-maker for $100, he should expect to make at least $100 worth of additional widgets. If he doesn't, he'll soon be an ex-widget-maker.I've been thinking about that a lot during the baseball strike.I keep thinking: The Baltimore Orioles pay Cal Ripken Jr. $7 million a year. How the hell does he earn $7 million in additional income for them?Assume that the average fan pays $20 for a ticket plus concessions.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 15, 2000
The message "greed is good" is heard loud and clear in "Bull," the new TNT television series debuting tonight about young investment bankers and traders trying to make it on Wall Street. Sound familiar? It should -- it was the mantra of the wheeler-dealer Gordon Gekko in "Wall Street," the 1985 feature film by Oliver Stone. But in "Bull," the good guys are saying it, and they're saying it without the slightest bit of irony. Taken with "Street," a new series from producer Darren Star premiering Nov. 1 on Fox that also celebrates life in the new economy, the shows might tell us something key about ourselves.
NEWS
December 12, 2007
Bailout rewards profligate spenders With President Bush's proposed bailout for many of those who fell victim to rampant greed in the subprime mortgage debacle, he displays his ignorance not only of world politics but also of the free-market financial world ("Mortgage aid plan puts limit on relief," Dec. 7). I'm sorry, but I find it hard to sympathize with the mortgage companies and all the others who logged huge profits while property values soared. They, in turn, lured more greedy financial victims into this house of cards by offering investment packages that bundled all these mortgage securities together.
NEWS
December 12, 2007
Bailout rewards profligate spenders With President Bush's proposed bailout for many of those who fell victim to rampant greed in the subprime mortgage debacle, he displays his ignorance not only of world politics but also of the free-market financial world ("Mortgage aid plan puts limit on relief," Dec. 7). I'm sorry, but I find it hard to sympathize with the mortgage companies and all the others who logged huge profits while property values soared. They, in turn, lured more greedy financial victims into this house of cards by offering investment packages that bundled all these mortgage securities together.
NEWS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2001
The clanging of the bell, precisely at 4 p.m. yesterday on the New York Stock Exchange, mercifully ended the worst week in the market's history, as battered stocks sank for the fifth day since reopening after last week's terrorist attacks. In what had already been an unnerving week, Wall Street saved some of its best shots for last with the Dow Jones industrial average climbing and then nose-diving much of the day, finally closing down 140.40 points, or 1.68 percent, to 8,235.81. About 12 minutes after trading began, the Dow had plunged 294 points.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 15, 2000
The message "greed is good" is heard loud and clear in "Bull," the new TNT television series debuting tonight about young investment bankers and traders trying to make it on Wall Street. Sound familiar? It should -- it was the mantra of the wheeler-dealer Gordon Gekko in "Wall Street," the 1985 feature film by Oliver Stone. But in "Bull," the good guys are saying it, and they're saying it without the slightest bit of irony. Taken with "Street," a new series from producer Darren Star premiering Nov. 1 on Fox that also celebrates life in the new economy, the shows might tell us something key about ourselves.
BUSINESS
March 8, 1996
Three chief executives of Maryland companies won Silver CEO awards for outstanding performance in their industries, awarded after polling of 3,500 chief executives by Financial World magazine.Alvin B. Krongard of Alex. Brown Inc., the Baltimore securities firm, joined Terence C. Golden of Host Marriott Corp. and J. Willard Marriott Jr. of Marriott International Inc. among the 71 winners in separate industry groups. "To get to that point, your peers in the industry had to vote you the best," magazine spokesman Tom Gibson said.
NEWS
By JOHN B HOLWAY | March 12, 1995
Back when I was a sophomore in college taking Economics 101, I was taught that if a businessman buys a widget-maker for $100, he should expect to make at least $100 worth of additional widgets. If he doesn't, he'll soon be an ex-widget-maker.I've been thinking about that a lot during the baseball strike.I keep thinking: The Baltimore Orioles pay Cal Ripken Jr. $7 million a year. How the hell does he earn $7 million in additional income for them?Assume that the average fan pays $20 for a ticket plus concessions.
BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Financial WorldNew York Bureau | June 16, 1993
NEW YORK -- Currency wars and a record year for Wall Street firms helped boost the earnings of the Street's top dogs to stratospheric levels last year, according to a published report released yesterday.In its annual ranking of the financial community's top earners, Financial World placed investment guru George Soros in the top place with a record $650 million, beating junk bond king Michael Milken, who was estimated to have made $500 million in one year before being convicted in 1990 of conspiring to violate securities and tax laws.
BUSINESS
March 8, 1996
Three chief executives of Maryland companies won Silver CEO awards for outstanding performance in their industries, awarded after polling of 3,500 chief executives by Financial World magazine.Alvin B. Krongard of Alex. Brown Inc., the Baltimore securities firm, joined Terence C. Golden of Host Marriott Corp. and J. Willard Marriott Jr. of Marriott International Inc. among the 71 winners in separate industry groups. "To get to that point, your peers in the industry had to vote you the best," magazine spokesman Tom Gibson said.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | December 13, 2011
Wall Street is its own worst enemy. It should have welcomed new financial regulation as a means of restoring public trust. Instead, it's busily shredding new regulations and making the public more distrustful than ever. The Street's biggest lobbying groups have just filed a lawsuit against the Commodities Futures Trading Commission, seeking to overturn its new rule limiting speculative trading in food, oil and other commodities. The Street makes bundles from these bets, but they have raised costs for consumers.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer Marina Sarris of the Annapolis Bureau contributed to this story | April 23, 1992
An annual ranking that names the best financially managed states -- used as a marketing tool to attract out-of-state businesses -- shows Maryland slipped a notch to a still laudable fourth place this year.The salt in the wound, however, is that the state's toughest economic-development competitor, Virginia, moved ahead of Maryland into first place in Financial World magazine's third annual "State of the States" rankings.The magazine judges the states by accounting and financial reporting systems; program performance evaluations; bond ratings; revenue and spending estimates and other budgeting measures.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service $ | February 25, 1992
Financial World magazine moved yesterday to sever its relationship with Graef S. Crystal, who writes on executive pay issues for the magazine, because of complaints about hiscolumn.Geoffrey N. Smith, the magazine's editor, said Financial World had decided not to renew Mr. Crystal's contract when it expires in September.He said Mr. Crystal, a professor at the University of California Berkeley, would be allowed to submit one more column for publication, on a pre-approved topic, after the current issue, which just went to press.
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