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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
Baltimore County auto insurance salesman Hal Katz is known for his offbeat television commercials, such as the one with the rapper singing, "Hey, Hal, you're the best!" Maryland insurance regulators likely would disagree. The Maryland Insurance Administration has been investigating Katz and his companies in the past several months over the alleged mishandling of premiums and use of unlicensed agents. Last week, Baltimore City Circuit Court placed two of his companies — Interstate Auto Insurance Co. and Katz's Insurance Agency — into receivership.
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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
Baltimore County auto insurance salesman Hal Katz is known for his offbeat television commercials, such as the one with the rapper singing, "Hey, Hal, you're the best!" Maryland insurance regulators likely would disagree. The Maryland Insurance Administration has been investigating Katz and his companies in the past several months over the alleged mishandling of premiums and use of unlicensed agents. Last week, Baltimore City Circuit Court placed two of his companies — Interstate Auto Insurance Co. and Katz's Insurance Agency — into receivership.
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SPORTS
October 29, 2001
He said it "Skip must think a lot of me to be in as the only lefty. I'll just try not to hurt myself, and just worry about pitching." Andy Pettitte, Yankees Game 2 pitcher, on batting against Randy Johnson last night. He said it "This isn't about making money. This is a lot of fun, playing for all the marbles. I don't think there's anything like it." Jerry Colangelo, Diamondbacks owner, on staying competitive without financial risk.
NEWS
By Michael Justin Lee | June 26, 2012
In 2008, I transitioned from professional practice to academia. Since then, I have been privileged to teach at several fine universities in theWashington, D.C.area. For me, the difficult economic times have had a silver lining in that they have given me so much to draw upon to illustrate course material. Before long, though, even as I was teaching about proper risk management and illustrating it with business world examples, I began wondering why this fundamental concept wasn't getting through to my students.
BUSINESS
By Kaitlin Gurney and Kaitlin Gurney,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 24, 2002
What's your comfort level with taking financial risk? If you're puzzled about how to honestly respond, you're not alone. Most people find out their comfort level with risk only after the fact - that is, after they've lost money. Then, and only then, do they know how much they can financially and emotionally afford to lose. Tolerance for risk is difficult to accurately gauge because taking risks (at least in the United States) is a socially desirable trait. Ever since our country's founding, entrepreneurial behavior has been highly regarded and amply rewarded.
NEWS
By Michael Justin Lee | June 26, 2012
In 2008, I transitioned from professional practice to academia. Since then, I have been privileged to teach at several fine universities in theWashington, D.C.area. For me, the difficult economic times have had a silver lining in that they have given me so much to draw upon to illustrate course material. Before long, though, even as I was teaching about proper risk management and illustrating it with business world examples, I began wondering why this fundamental concept wasn't getting through to my students.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2010
Sarah Bloom Raskin is deeply interested in the economy's effect on everyday life, a driving force in her work to keep Marylanders from being scammed, foreclosed on or caught up in a bank failure. That consumer focus caught White House attention. Raskin, Maryland's top financial regulator, is one of three nominated Thursday by President Barack Obama to fill empty seats on the powerful Federal Reserve Board of Governors. She would join at a fraught time for the Fed, which has been criticized for paying too little attention to consumer issues.
NEWS
By Henry C. Lucas Jr | February 24, 2010
As someone who has spent many years working with the application, management and impact of information technology, I have been relieved to see that the myriad of articles on the causes of the financial crisis of the last 18 months have so far not blamed the computer. As the crisis unfolded, my first thought was that someone will use technology as the excuse for it. But if technology was not to blame for the crisis, what was the role of such things as computers, databases and telecommunications networks?
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1996
Status quo will reign for at least another year at the Columbia Association -- after CA officials used a weekend retreat to shoot down sweeping proposals on everything from assessment cuts to stricter approval procedures for multimillion-dollar spending projects.The officials -- essentially the majority of the association's 10-member governing body called the Columbia Council -- said the changes made little sense financially.They pointed out that the proposed cuts in property assessments, known in the planned city as the "CPRA lien," could push the association to default on part of its $90 million debt by virtue of a formula that links its allowable debt costs to its lien income.
NEWS
June 4, 2012
Maryland's state treasurer, Nancy Kopp, has duties that include supervising more than $36 billion in investments for the pension fund covering state employees and teachers. It's her business to protect and grow that portfolio for years to come, and that requires getting the best information possible to gauge how much risk comes with any particular investment. She says she isn't getting it. The problem? Despite two-year-old guidelines issued by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, major U.S. corporations aren't fully disclosing their risk from the impact of climate change.
NEWS
June 4, 2012
Maryland's state treasurer, Nancy Kopp, has duties that include supervising more than $36 billion in investments for the pension fund covering state employees and teachers. It's her business to protect and grow that portfolio for years to come, and that requires getting the best information possible to gauge how much risk comes with any particular investment. She says she isn't getting it. The problem? Despite two-year-old guidelines issued by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, major U.S. corporations aren't fully disclosing their risk from the impact of climate change.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2010
Sarah Bloom Raskin is deeply interested in the economy's effect on everyday life, a driving force in her work to keep Marylanders from being scammed, foreclosed on or caught up in a bank failure. That consumer focus caught White House attention. Raskin, Maryland's top financial regulator, is one of three nominated Thursday by President Barack Obama to fill empty seats on the powerful Federal Reserve Board of Governors. She would join at a fraught time for the Fed, which has been criticized for paying too little attention to consumer issues.
NEWS
By Henry C. Lucas Jr | February 24, 2010
As someone who has spent many years working with the application, management and impact of information technology, I have been relieved to see that the myriad of articles on the causes of the financial crisis of the last 18 months have so far not blamed the computer. As the crisis unfolded, my first thought was that someone will use technology as the excuse for it. But if technology was not to blame for the crisis, what was the role of such things as computers, databases and telecommunications networks?
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Doug Donovan and Jill Rosen and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2005
They are not convinced. Despite more than 10 hours of public hearings, private tutoring sessions, reams of tedious documents, endorsements from the mayor and cajoling phone calls from union leaders, Baltimore City Council members are just not ready to approve a convention center hotel - which, at $305 million, would be the city's costliest public project. So today, when hotel advocates had hoped the project would go to a vote, the council will instead continue asking questions at a work session, trying to get a handle on the complex and increasingly controversial proposal.
BUSINESS
By Kaitlin Gurney and Kaitlin Gurney,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 24, 2002
What's your comfort level with taking financial risk? If you're puzzled about how to honestly respond, you're not alone. Most people find out their comfort level with risk only after the fact - that is, after they've lost money. Then, and only then, do they know how much they can financially and emotionally afford to lose. Tolerance for risk is difficult to accurately gauge because taking risks (at least in the United States) is a socially desirable trait. Ever since our country's founding, entrepreneurial behavior has been highly regarded and amply rewarded.
SPORTS
October 29, 2001
He said it "Skip must think a lot of me to be in as the only lefty. I'll just try not to hurt myself, and just worry about pitching." Andy Pettitte, Yankees Game 2 pitcher, on batting against Randy Johnson last night. He said it "This isn't about making money. This is a lot of fun, playing for all the marbles. I don't think there's anything like it." Jerry Colangelo, Diamondbacks owner, on staying competitive without financial risk.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Doug Donovan and Jill Rosen and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2005
They are not convinced. Despite more than 10 hours of public hearings, private tutoring sessions, reams of tedious documents, endorsements from the mayor and cajoling phone calls from union leaders, Baltimore City Council members are just not ready to approve a convention center hotel - which, at $305 million, would be the city's costliest public project. So today, when hotel advocates had hoped the project would go to a vote, the council will instead continue asking questions at a work session, trying to get a handle on the complex and increasingly controversial proposal.
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1996
Status quo will reign for at least another year at the Columbia Association -- after CA officials used a weekend retreat to shoot down sweeping proposals on everything from assessment cuts to stricter approval procedures for multimillion-dollar spending projects.The officials -- essentially the majority of the association's 10-member governing body called the Columbia Council -- said the changes made little sense financially.They pointed out that the proposed cuts in property assessments, known in the planned city as the "CPRA lien," could push the association to default on part of its $90 million debt by virtue of a formula that links its allowable debt costs to its lien income.
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