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Financial Literacy

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By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2011
With a heap of recession-era tales of woe stoking people's financial fears, a free workshop for parents and teens seems like a good way to prevent costly mistakes by a generation coming of age in wildly uncertain economic times. That's just what Making Change Center has in mind as it prepares to host the second annual Howard County Passport to Financial Literacy on Feb. 5 at Howard Community College. Sponsored by the nonprofit organization founded in 1991 by former HCC President Dwight Burrill and now run by his daughter, Michelle Glassburn, the self-guided tour takes teens in middle and high school to 20 stations.
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FEATURES
By Michael Neidhardt, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
On Sept. 25, 2004, Loyola High's Van Brooks suffered a broken neck and was paralyzed when his helmet collided with a knee while making a routine tackle. That day marked the end of his athletic career but led to a new passion: being a community leader. "The only thing I could rely on was my education," Brooks said. "Even with all that athletic ability gone, my education is something that couldn't be taken from me. " Now 26, he strives to emphasize the importance of schooling to children.
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2011
When graduates of the National Academy Foundation interview for jobs in the financial world, some will have an advantage unlike students from any other school in Baltimore: They'll be able to cash in on years of experience operating a fully functioning branch of a city credit union. For more than two years, the South Baltimore high school has housed a branch of the Municipal Employee Credit Union, carrying out the day-to-day duties of opening accounts, taking deposits and dispensing cash for members of the school community.
EXPLORE
June 17, 2013
Students at Ring Factory Elementary School in Bel Air recently took part in the annual Junior Achievement program, learning real-life business and financial lessons, as taught by parent volunteers, regular teachers, and employees of Freedom Federal Credit Union. The program was delivered on April 25 with each class taking part in five educational sessions geared to students in kindergarten through fifth grade. This is the sixth year Freedom has supported the Junior Achievement (JA)
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman | laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | November 30, 2009
Comptroller Peter Franchot has been going back to high school as part of his push for requiring that seniors take a course in financial literacy in order to graduate. The proposal for a graduation requirement has met with resistance from lawmakers and educators who are wary of imposing curriculum mandates, but Franchot said the recent recession has convinced him that basic personal finance concepts must be taught. Franchot, the state's chief tax collector, has visited seven high schools since the school year began and plans to push for legislation during the General Assembly session that begins in January.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose | February 10, 2002
YOU DON'T hear many good things about Enron Corp. these days. But if there's one positive aspect, says AARP's president, it's that the Enron debacle has highlighted the need for Americans to understand the investment process. Numerous studies and surveys in recent years have revealed that Americans' financial knowledge is inadequate for a world where they must fund their own retirement and face a growing choice of mortgages, credit cards and investments. The consequences of not knowing financial basics are costly, according to statistics compiled by the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs: As many as half of those who borrow from subprime lenders could actually qualify for cheaper conventional loans.
NEWS
By GINA DAVIS and GINA DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | July 12, 2006
Alarmed by statistics that suggest high school graduates lack a basic knowledge of money management, Carroll County school officials want to join a handful of other local districts that require students to pass a financial literacy course to graduate. "Some kids think you don't have to pay a credit card back because their parents get the bill and pay it," Carroll Superintendent Charles I. Ecker said yesterday. "Kids are not learning about financial responsibility [because] a lot of parents don't know how to manage money."
NEWS
By GINA DAVIS AND DAVID P. GREISMAN and GINA DAVIS AND DAVID P. GREISMAN,SUN REPORTERS | July 16, 2006
Carroll County's school board members largely support teaching financial literacy to teens, but some question a proposal to make it a graduation requirement. Citing statistics that indicate many students are graduating without basic knowledge of money management, local school officials, including Superintendent Charles I. Ecker, want to require students starting ninth grade in 2007 to pass a half-credit financial literacy course to graduate. But school board members, who said they see the value of teaching teens about financial matters, pondered the merits of the proposed requirement during last week's board meeting.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN REPORTER | October 12, 2006
Carroll County students will be required to take a "financial literacy" course to graduate, despite an effort at last night's school board meeting to quash the proposal. Board members voted 4-1 to require students beginning next school year to take the half-credit course that will cover concepts such as money management, consumer rights and responsibilities, credit, savings and investing. Carroll joins a handful of Maryland school systems -- including Harford, St. Mary's, Talbot and Baltimore counties -- with a similar requirement.
BUSINESS
By SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 29, 2002
More high school kids are flashing credit cards. But don't ask them about the dangers of running up big debt. That's the gloomy conclusion of the latest test of high school seniors' financial literacy, which found two-thirds failed to get a passing grade when asked about managing their finances, organizing checkbooks and knowing the investment value of stocks. Just 32 percent passed the nationwide test, which was administered during the winter to 4,000 students. The average score was 50.2 percent, a six-year low. "They are only getting half the questions right in a nation where one-third of the high school seniors already use a credit card and half have access to an ATM machine," said Lewis Mandell, economics professor at State University of New York, Buffalo, who administered the test.
FEATURES
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2013
After school three days a week, Alexis Corbin, 16, a junior at Carver Vocational-Technical High School, walks the short distance to Coppin State University. There, she and 10 other students participate in the Comcast Digital Connectors Program at the Coppin Heights-Rosemont Family Computer Center on campus. They learn about computers, financial literacy and leadership, and in turn bring their knowledge to the community, by leading classes on such topics as how to use social media, operate cell phones or create website pages.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2013
Some foreign-born students at Howard Community College enter professor Mary Beth Furst's business class, sit attentively through instruction and say next to nothing. Furst said that when they are called upon, "You would think they were going to die, because they're really uncomfortable speaking up. " She recently discovered one of the reasons behind the silence: Some students hail from countries where it is disrespectful to ask an instructor a question. Furst and other HCC faculty and staff are learning about the college's ever-diversifying student population — and coming up with better ways to break down cultural and communications gaps — through a professional development program called INSPIRES Global Perspectives.
NEWS
September 4, 2012
The age of majority in Maryland is 21. That's when childhood and adolescence officially end. But just because a young person reaches that age doesn't mean he or she is prepared to undertake all the responsibilities of adulthood. And the difficulties faced by youths venturing out into the world for the first time are only compounded when they have grown up in foster care without a family to call their own. Few young people are really prepared to make their way independently at that age, even if they have been lucky enough to have loving parents, a stable home, a fine education and opportunities to participate in sports, social events and other activities.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2012
Baltimore police arrested five people last week accused of impersonating city tax collectors and going to the homes of elderly residents to rob them. These are disturbing allegations. But apparently, scam artists who pretend to have ties to the government so they can take advantage of older consumers aren't all that rare. That's what senior advocates are telling the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the federal agency with a mandate to promote financial literacy among those 62 and older and protect them from fraud and abuse.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | April 26, 2012
Alas, sisters, a study by the FINRA Investor Education Foundation finds that men are better users of credit cards. The survey, which polled about 500 people in each state and D.C., found that Maryland men are less likely to carry a balance, pay only the minimum or owe late or over-the-limit fees than women here. For example, 55 percent of women polled in the state carried a balance on their cards, compared with 47 percent of men. Thirty-four percent of men paid the minimum due; compared with 41 percent of women.
EXPLORE
March 29, 2012
Central Library 10375 Little Patuxent Pkwy., Columbia. 410-313-7800. •All Together Now. Saturdays, 10:15 and 11:30 a.m. All ages; 30 minutes. •Book Boosters. Wed., April 4, 7 p.m. Discuss latest reads and hear suggestions from fellow book lovers. •Eclectic Evenings. Second Tuesdays, 7 p.m. •English Conversation Club. Mondays, 10 a.m.; and Thursdays, 7:30 p.m. Practice speaking and understanding English in a group setting.
NEWS
November 7, 2010
Fiscal irresponsibility is everyone's favorite target these days — look no further than last week's midterm elections, where attacking reckless federal spending was a successful Republican rallying cry. Here in Maryland, the state recently began requiring its public schools to teach every high school student a class in personal financial literacy. That's all well and good, but isn't this a job for the parents as well? To augment the state's effort, I'm offering my family-instilled and personally developed consumer lessons to emphasize the integral role parents must also play in educating students about money matters.
NEWS
January 26, 2012
Thanks for your insightful front-page story on the increasing homelessness among Maryland youths ("Homeless student numbers growing," Jan. 22). Your story sheds light on a largely unseen, deeply troubling problem of which we are keenly aware. Of as great concern as what homeless youth experience during the winter months is what they endure during the long, hot summer days when school is out. Shelters typically are closed between dawn and dusk during this season, and these vulnerable young people are often left to fend for themselves.
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