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Financial Future

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BUSINESS
By ANDREW LECKEY and ANDREW LECKEY,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | January 22, 2006
Your future is in your hands. I grew up in a time when workers proudly discussed their pensions as the light at the end of the tunnel. When I became a journalist, pensions were often the No. 1 topic of comments by retirees at company annual meetings. Now, companies mostly describe pensions as bottomless pits. Giants such as International Business Machines Corp., Verizon Communications Inc. and Hewlett-Packard Co. have moved to freeze their pensions. A freeze halts the buildup of additional benefits for some or all employees and saves a company money by erasing part of the debt owed to future retirees.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 30, 2012
You stumble upon some extra money lying around the house - some spare change behind the sofa cushions or the equivalent. You might be pleased with your unexpected good (albeit only modestly so) fortune, but you probably wouldn't be looking to spend it immediately or think it significantly changes your family finances. Yet it appears that in Annapolis, the presence of about $229.7 million more in revenue at the final close-out of the last fiscal year, which ended June 30, may actually prompt that kind of thinking.
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BUSINESS
By Mary Rowland and Mary Rowland,New York Times News Service | March 31, 1991
Robyn S. Iskoe specializes in financial planning for th wealthy. She knows the ins and outs of pension plans, can interpret the fine print of the tax code and recite obscure estate-planning rules.But when it comes to her own finances, Ms. Iskoe, 33, admits to a problem: For years, she put off the financial planning she knows is essential because she expected one day to be married and to do these things with her husband. Until recently, she lived in a studio apartment. And she has only recently begun to invest the way she urges clients to do. For years, she said, "I just let my money sit in a money-market fund."
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | January 17, 2012
The first baby born at Sinai Hospital during Sunday's Ravens game is going to get a little contribution toward their financial future. The Northwest Baltimore hospital is going to give a $3,000 savings bond to the first baby born after the kick off of the game against the New England Patriots. The hospital sees the gift as a way to celebrate the Ravens' success and cheer them on during the playoffs. "That baby will literally be able to say he or she was born a Ravens fan," said  Neil Meltzer, president and COO of Sinai.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Harriet J. Brackey and Harriet J. Brackey,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 17, 2002
Can you go online and truly plan your retirement? No, not every single detail. But you will find some helpful tools that allow you to outline your financial future, whether you plan on retiring 10, 20 or 30 years from now. What's available today is far more sophisticated than a few years ago. The first offerings online were simple calculators and they somehow always indicated that you never saved enough money. Being browbeaten is not much fun. Or especially educational. Now, you can tap into entire financial planning systems that allow you to think through all the "What if I do this?"
BUSINESS
January 7, 2001
People need more and more information to navigate today's financial maze. On these pages, Dollars & Sense brings you information on a wide range of topics like mutual funds, insurance, credit, retirement and college costs to help you plan your financial future.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,Sun reporter | March 11, 2007
Fort Lauderdale, Fla. -- Brian Roberts leaned forward at his locker yesterday and dug a spoon into his yogurt parfait, a healthy breakfast alternative that matches the healthy attitude he brings into the clubhouse each morning. He laughed at a failed prank by one of his teammates, and hardly bore the look of a man who's stressed about his financial future. Another day passed without Roberts signing a contract extension. He marked the occasion by collecting singles in his only two trips to the plate and stealing a base in the Orioles' 4-0 loss to the St. Louis Cardinals.
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | January 17, 2012
The first baby born at Sinai Hospital during Sunday's Ravens game is going to get a little contribution toward their financial future. The Northwest Baltimore hospital is going to give a $3,000 savings bond to the first baby born after the kick off of the game against the New England Patriots. The hospital sees the gift as a way to celebrate the Ravens' success and cheer them on during the playoffs. "That baby will literally be able to say he or she was born a Ravens fan," said  Neil Meltzer, president and COO of Sinai.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | August 28, 1998
DO YOU put off planning your financial future? Here are some common excuses people use, according to the Institute of Certified Financial Planners, for not planning, and my suggestions:"I don't see a real need; I'm doing just fine."You may feel just fine now, but how about if things suddenlyworsen? What if you lose your job? Become disabled? Divorced? Die prematurely? Are you and your family ready to handle financial crisis? Do you plan to retire on just Social Security checks and a small pension?
BUSINESS
By Boston Globe | August 19, 1992
BOSTON -- Wealth never meant much to the late An Wang, who owned two suits, both gray, even though he was worth billions. It's a lesson his heirs might find useful as they confront a sharp downturn in the family fortune.And yet, the Wang legacy -- if not the financial future -- was made secure by the millions of dollars An Wang gave away during his company's years of plenty.As Wang Laboratories Inc. enters bankruptcy protection, there are two ways to look at the fate of the Wang family: First, the value of their stock has fallen 97 percent from its peak, and second, they're still rich.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,Sun reporter | March 11, 2007
Fort Lauderdale, Fla. -- Brian Roberts leaned forward at his locker yesterday and dug a spoon into his yogurt parfait, a healthy breakfast alternative that matches the healthy attitude he brings into the clubhouse each morning. He laughed at a failed prank by one of his teammates, and hardly bore the look of a man who's stressed about his financial future. Another day passed without Roberts signing a contract extension. He marked the occasion by collecting singles in his only two trips to the plate and stealing a base in the Orioles' 4-0 loss to the St. Louis Cardinals.
BUSINESS
By Humberto Cruz and Humberto Cruz,Tribune Media Services | September 3, 2006
Some of the most readable books on personal finance these days are not really about money. They're mostly about you, and how your personality, impulses and behavior affect the way you handle - or mishandle - money. I'll give capsule reviews of two after a basic overview of the subject. As a rule, books on money, personality and behavior come in two flavors. Some focus primarily on "behavioral finance," a growing field of study that explores how certain human behaviors and ways of thinking can lead to unsound financial decisions.
NEWS
By OREN RAWLS | April 30, 2006
According to the latest polls, nearly seven out of 10 Americans think things in our country aren't heading in the right direction. Now, the pollsters never bothered to call me and ask my opinion, but I'd say I have a pretty good idea of when things are on the wrong track. I'm not yet 30, but already I've got good reason to worry about what will happen when I get older. I earn a decent income, but 15.3 percent of it is taken out for Medicare and Social Security. Medicare faces insolvency in another 14 years, according to the people who run the program, and Social Security is projected to go broke when I'm 64. So, $1 out of every $6.54 I earn goes to pay for benefits that I might very well never see. Maybe I could take some comfort in knowing that my hard-earned tax dollars are going to my parents and grandparents, who've already paid their dues to society.
BUSINESS
By ANDREW LECKEY and ANDREW LECKEY,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | January 22, 2006
Your future is in your hands. I grew up in a time when workers proudly discussed their pensions as the light at the end of the tunnel. When I became a journalist, pensions were often the No. 1 topic of comments by retirees at company annual meetings. Now, companies mostly describe pensions as bottomless pits. Giants such as International Business Machines Corp., Verizon Communications Inc. and Hewlett-Packard Co. have moved to freeze their pensions. A freeze halts the buildup of additional benefits for some or all employees and saves a company money by erasing part of the debt owed to future retirees.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | June 12, 2005
MY son elected to attend a military academy, so I have never received one of those frightening tuition bills for him. But because he needs money for uniforms and combat boots and, well, a new road-racing bicycle, I turned his college fund over to him. He laughed out loud. "What kind of college education did you think I was gonna get with this?" he asked. I stopped saving for my children's college education when it became clear to me that I would never save enough. College tuitions are spiraling toward the unbelievable, and compared with those numbers their "college funds" looked more like the proceeds from a lemonade stand.
TOPIC
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2003
HIGH SCHOOLS to the north of Baltimore have produced a Golden Triangle of athletes in the past 17 months - Juan Dixon of Calvert Hall, Carmelo Anthony of Towson Catholic and Michael Phelps of Towson. All three have found gold, but they measure it in different ways. Dixon made a guaranteed $1 million in his rookie season playing basketball with the Washington Wizards in the National Basketball Association; Anthony will earn $2.7 million in his rookie year with the NBA's Denver Nuggets; Phelps just took away three gold medals from the world swimming championships in Barcelona, Spain.
BUSINESS
By Humberto Cruz and Humberto Cruz,Tribune Media Services | September 3, 2006
Some of the most readable books on personal finance these days are not really about money. They're mostly about you, and how your personality, impulses and behavior affect the way you handle - or mishandle - money. I'll give capsule reviews of two after a basic overview of the subject. As a rule, books on money, personality and behavior come in two flavors. Some focus primarily on "behavioral finance," a growing field of study that explores how certain human behaviors and ways of thinking can lead to unsound financial decisions.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1999
James M. Beck had a goal in mind when he sat down with a financial planner seven years ago. He was 39 years old, and he wanted to be able to retire when he was 55.But, although Beck had saved money after graduating from college, which he used to buy his first house, he hadn't put away a nickel from 1985 to 1992."
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2003
Support for President Bush has cooled among Maryland's voters as terrorism fears linger and concerns about a new war in Iraq and a faltering economy come to the forefront, a new poll for The Sun released today shows. The nation's 43rd president has seen his popularity in the state fall from a sky-high 83 percent approval rating a year ago to a more pedestrian 55 percent - a still admirable figure considering the vast majority of Marylanders voted for someone else in the 2000 election. But when it comes to whether state voters think Bush deserves to be re-elected next year, just 39 percent say they would choose him, 45 percent would choose a nameless "someone else," and 16 percent are undecided.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Harriet J. Brackey and Harriet J. Brackey,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 17, 2002
Can you go online and truly plan your retirement? No, not every single detail. But you will find some helpful tools that allow you to outline your financial future, whether you plan on retiring 10, 20 or 30 years from now. What's available today is far more sophisticated than a few years ago. The first offerings online were simple calculators and they somehow always indicated that you never saved enough money. Being browbeaten is not much fun. Or especially educational. Now, you can tap into entire financial planning systems that allow you to think through all the "What if I do this?"
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