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By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2013
The judges of Maryland's top court are subject to the second-best financial disclosure rules in the country, according to a national study. But the report found that transparency is so bad nationwide that no state got a letter grade higher than "C. " Though the study by the Center for Public Integrity said the state compels Court of Appeals judges to submit plenty of financial data, it said that information is of limited use because it is difficult...
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
For the first time, financial disclosure forms for nearly 1,900 Baltimore government officials will be online for public inspection, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced Monday. Individuals will be able to search online for loans, family income sources, gifts and business relationships for government workers and elected officials. The change eliminates the need to travel to City Hall to pull documents, though residents will not be able to use the system until they set up an account in person.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2012
Seven senior federal employees and four employees' groups filed a federal lawsuit Thursday to stop their agencies from posting their salaries, stock portfolios and other assets online. Congress required federal agencies to post the data by Aug. 31 as part of the Stop Trading on Congressional Knowledge Act, which bans insider trading by members of Congress, their staff members and other high-level federal employees. The suit was filed in U.S. District Court in Maryland by the Senior Executives Association, the American Foreign Service Association, the Assembly of Scientists, the National Association of Immigration Judges and seven individuals.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2013
The judges of Maryland's top court are subject to the second-best financial disclosure rules in the country, according to a national study. But the report found that transparency is so bad nationwide that no state got a letter grade higher than "C. " Though the study by the Center for Public Integrity said the state compels Court of Appeals judges to submit plenty of financial data, it said that information is of limited use because it is difficult...
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | July 20, 2007
Maryland gets a grade of "D" when it comes to the information governors are required to provide about their finances, according to a national watchdog group. The Center for Public Integrity, a Washington-based nonprofit dedicated to making the nation's institutions more transparent, gave the state a marginal rating of 62.5 on a 100-point scale measuring how extensively governors are required to report their personal finances and how accessible those records are to the public. Leah Rush, the center's director of state projects, said full disclosure allows people to know whether elected officials are acting in the public's interest or in their own. "Getting this information out in the public domain is an important function as far as gaining the public's trust in their government to be open about all the different hats public officials wear," she said.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | September 20, 1994
An aide to County Executive Robert R. Neall expressed concern last night that requiring members of boards and commissions to file financial disclosure forms could discourage participation.Myron V. Wotring, Mr. Neall's legislative liaison, also raised questions about a proposal to protect whistle-blowers. The proposal would allow a county employee who is retaliated against for reporting an ethics violation to sue the jurisdiction within a year."We feel that this is a major policy question," Mr. Wotring said.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | July 8, 1992
A bill that would require financial disclosure by nominees to four county boards and commissions has been put off until fall.Council Chairman Paul Farragut, a Columbia Democrat,proposed tabling the bill at the County Council meeting Monday so the council could get more information on the issue. The council voted, 5-0, to table the bill."I didn't hear from as many people as I thought I might," Mr. Farragut said yesterday.The council did hear from people who thought requiring potential appointees to fill out a nine-page disclosure statement was targeted at the Human Rights Commission.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | June 24, 1992
A bill that would require members of the Human Rights Commission and four other appointed boards to disclose their finances before appointment came under heavy attack Monday.The bill, sponsored by the county Ethics Commission, would require nominees to the Human Rights Commission, the Animal Matters Hearing Board, the Board of Electrical Examiners, the Board of Health and the Personnel Board to join members of 11 other boards and commissions in filling out the county's nine-page financial disclosure statement.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2003
The city's ethics board disqualified five candidates yesterday from running in the Sept. 9 primary because they missed the deadline for filing routine financial disclosure reports. Those disqualified by the board were: Dominque Stevenson, a Democrat running for mayor; Kevin L. Martin, a Republican in the race for council president; council contender Loretta Johnson, a Democrat in the 10th District; and two 11th district candidates, Republican James Quigley and Democrat Michael Seipp. One of the ousted candidates, Quigley, won a second chance, thanks to another provision of the election law. Seipp, perhaps the best known of the five, and others said they would fight the ruling.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2003
A new Police Department policy that applies stricter professional standards to the transfer of officers has run afoul of a union critical of its financial disclosure requirements. Commissioner Kevin P. Clark implemented the policy last month to establish performance evaluation standards intent on rewarding officers with their requested assignments based on objective, rather than subjective, measures. "We're getting rid of the old boy's network," said Sean Malone, the department's chief of special projects.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2013
Dr. Joshua Zimmerberg says he's careful not to publicly disclose any personal information that could be of use to identity thieves. But soon, he might not have any choice but to have his finances published on the Internet for the world to see. Zimmerberg, a researcher and manager at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, is one of 28,000 federal employees in the executive branch who come under last year's Stop Trading on Congressional Knowledge...
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2012
Developers and shopping-center owners have contributed more than $225,000 to efforts to challenge zoning decisions in Baltimore County through referendums, financial disclosure forms show. Contributors to the drive include firms tied to developers Howard Brown and the Cordish Cos., as well as those that run the Garrison Forest Plaza in Owings Mills and Green Spring Station in Lutherville. The backers have paid political firms, lawyers and others in hopes of putting land-use issues in two districts on the 2014 ballot, according to the documents filed Friday with the county elections board.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2012
A committee set up to oppose Gov. Martin O'Malley's new congressional resdistricting plan has told the State Board of Elections that it has raised less than $1,000 toward the Nov. 6 election. Repeal the Gerrymander, a group chaired by Republican activist Antonio Campbell, thus does not have to file the detailed financial disclosure required for committees that reach that threshold. The committee was among a handful that had filed its paper work hours before the close of business Friday.
NEWS
October 10, 2012
Politicians and the media urge holding teachers accountable for the performance of schools and their students. As a classroom teacher, I support accountability, and I'm willing to be evaluated on student test scores and student/administration evaluations. However, as I read our article on financial mismanagement and lack of oversight in the city schools I asked myself whether in fairness to taxpayers - and the good of students - there isn't more accountability to go around ("Schools get 'F' in finance control," Oct. 7)
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2012
Seven senior federal employees and four employees' groups filed a federal lawsuit Thursday to stop their agencies from posting their salaries, stock portfolios and other assets online. Congress required federal agencies to post the data by Aug. 31 as part of the Stop Trading on Congressional Knowledge Act, which bans insider trading by members of Congress, their staff members and other high-level federal employees. The suit was filed in U.S. District Court in Maryland by the Senior Executives Association, the American Foreign Service Association, the Assembly of Scientists, the National Association of Immigration Judges and seven individuals.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2012
Lawmakers of both parties congratulated themselves on the overwhelming bipartisan passage of a law that bars members of Congress from insider trading. But with key provisions of the STOCK Act due to take effect this summer, another group that falls under its requirements is raising objections. Beginning Aug. 31, agencies will be required to make the personal financial details of top-level government managers, along with information about spouses and dependent children, available to the public online.
NEWS
By DOUG DONOVAN and DOUG DONOVAN,SUN REPORTER | February 7, 2006
Baltimore City Council President Sheila Dixon made a mistake by not disclosing that her sister works for a company that is regulated by city government, officials from the president's office said yesterday. An article in The Sun on Monday revealed that Dixon had not disclosed her sister's employment with fiber optic cable firm Utech, a minority subcontractor for Comcast of Baltimore, the city's cable provider. Baltimore's ethics laws require public officials to disclose whether siblings or other relatives work for companies that do business or are regulated by the city.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2012
WEATHER Today's forecast calls for mostly cloudy skies in the Baltimore area, with a high near 94. There is a 70 percent chance of precipitation, most likely after 1 p.m. Friday night is expected to be cloudy, with a low around 72. TRAFFIC Check our traffic updates for this morning's issues as you plan your commute. FROM LAST NIGHT... Council discards cuts, approves mayor's budget plan : The Baltimore City Council reversed course Thursday, rejecting millions of dollars in budget cuts it had endorsed earlier in the week, and passing Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's original $2.3 billion spending plan.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2012
Baltimore County principals are protesting a new financial disclosure form that is the most detailed of any required in the region, setting up a debate over how much personal information some school officials should have to divulge to the public. Principals were told last spring that they must fill out a 14-page financial disclosure form that is the same as that required of school board members, the superintendent and other officials who make decisions about purchases. "We feel it is too intrusive," said Tom Evans, principal of Eastern Technical High School.
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