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BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | August 4, 1999
WHEN YOU GET a raise or bonus, do you worry about paying taxes on the new money? Financial consultant David Landay says you can take that money tax-free by contributing the funds to your company's 401(k) or other retirement plan."The money becomes a pretax retirement contribution, escaping income tax -- and it grows tax-free until you retire," he says.The most popular stocks among newsletters followed by Hulbert Financial Digest (with number recommending in parentheses) include: Cisco Systems Inc. (16)
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BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | March 23, 2001
MONEY MATTERS: "A study of 12,000 stocks found that split stocks outperformed those that didn't," says Money magazine. "There's no logical reason - two nickels aren't worth more than a dime - but if you're considering two similar stocks and one announces a split, go with that one." "The top-performing investment newsletters over the last 10 years were, in order, The Prudent Speculator, OTC Insight, Equity Fund Outlook, The Insiders and Timer Digest." (Hulbert Financial Digest) "Weed your stock garden periodically," says Moneypaper.
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BUSINESS
By Andrew LecKey and Andrew LecKey,Tribune Media Services | August 27, 1993
Despite record stock market highs, a sluggish economic recovery and worrisome decisions emanating from Washington, the nation's top-performing investment letters are still confident that you'll get along swimmingly in stocks.Of course, the strength of reliable advisers is an ability to pick individual equities likely to do well no matter what the circumstances around them may be. This is, after all, a stock-picker's market."My thinking is that the stock market is going to edge sideways for a long time, while company earnings rise and improve overall stock valuations," said George Putnam, editor of The Turnaround Letter, whose model portfolio as tracked by the Hulbert Financial Digest is up 54.7 percent over the past 12 months.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | August 4, 1999
WHEN YOU GET a raise or bonus, do you worry about paying taxes on the new money? Financial consultant David Landay says you can take that money tax-free by contributing the funds to your company's 401(k) or other retirement plan."The money becomes a pretax retirement contribution, escaping income tax -- and it grows tax-free until you retire," he says.The most popular stocks among newsletters followed by Hulbert Financial Digest (with number recommending in parentheses) include: Cisco Systems Inc. (16)
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | March 23, 2001
MONEY MATTERS: "A study of 12,000 stocks found that split stocks outperformed those that didn't," says Money magazine. "There's no logical reason - two nickels aren't worth more than a dime - but if you're considering two similar stocks and one announces a split, go with that one." "The top-performing investment newsletters over the last 10 years were, in order, The Prudent Speculator, OTC Insight, Equity Fund Outlook, The Insiders and Timer Digest." (Hulbert Financial Digest) "Weed your stock garden periodically," says Moneypaper.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | December 11, 1998
HERE ARE some suggestions for making and saving money:After Jan. 1, 2000, is your money safe at your bank? "Yes," says Kiplinger's Advisor, "but that doesn't mean quick access to your cash. Over 500 small banks, thrifts and other financial institutions lag in fixing computers to recognize Year 2000. If you're not sure your bank will be ready, consider switching to a larger bank which invested more resources to correct the problem."Also, carefully study your bank, brokerage, credit union and credit-card statements starting around mid-year 1999 and the first months of 2000.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | June 6, 1997
SHORT PIECES of advice:"Louis Navellier's MPT Review is in first place among all financial newsletters we tracked over the last 10 years." (Hulbert Financial Digest.)McCormick & Co. stock is listed under "Rising Stars" in S&P Outlook, June 4. "We anticipate improving conditions for spices, giving McCormick, with a 40 percent share of the market, an earnings boost in the next few quarters," the magazine says of the Maryland company."When you can see no disadvantages in a financial proposition, look harder."
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | July 25, 1997
HERE'S A midsummer picnic of financial goodies:"Cheerful news for EE Savings Bonds buyers. Interest is up from 85 to 90 percent of average yield on five-year Treasury securities, boosting your yield substantially." (Dick Davis Income Digest.)"Ten-year top performing stock newsletters through midyear, in order: MPT Review, New Issue Letter, BI Research, Prudent Speculator." (Hulbert Financial Digest.)"Exxon hiked its dividends 6 percent a year for over a decade and usually fares better than the market in downturns."
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | November 4, 1993
Pushed down by profit-taking, higher interest rates and computerized program selling, the Dow Jones industrial average fell 35.77 points yesterday and closed at 3,661.87. Utilities were also weak, down about 3 percent on average.Regarding yesterday's sharp drop: "Don't fall in love with your stocks; they can break your heart." (Stock Trader's Almanac) . . . "Become more humble as the market goes your way." (Bernard Baruch, legendary Wall Street sage.)NOVEMBER NUGGETS: November has historically been the year's second-best Wall Street month, rising an average 1.5 percent over the last 41 years, as measured by the S&P composite index.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | September 6, 1995
Mark Hulbert may have shaved off his beard, styled his hair and traded in flannel work shirts for designer suits.But he's still the relentless investment letter tracker he was 15 years ago when he started the Hulbert Financial Digest.I first met Hulbert shortly after that publication was launched. He preached his philosophy of keeping pundits honest by constructing and following a mythical $10,000 portfolio based on each editor's recommendations. As a recent graduate of Oxford University, he was intent on quantifying advice.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | December 11, 1998
HERE ARE some suggestions for making and saving money:After Jan. 1, 2000, is your money safe at your bank? "Yes," says Kiplinger's Advisor, "but that doesn't mean quick access to your cash. Over 500 small banks, thrifts and other financial institutions lag in fixing computers to recognize Year 2000. If you're not sure your bank will be ready, consider switching to a larger bank which invested more resources to correct the problem."Also, carefully study your bank, brokerage, credit union and credit-card statements starting around mid-year 1999 and the first months of 2000.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | December 5, 1997
Ideas on where to put -- or not put -- your money, some from offbeat publications you won't find on newsstands."MAX OUT": "Maximize contributions to your company's retirement plan, such as 401(k). We hope you realize that Social Security won't meet all of your retirement needs. The tax-free investment growth and savings discipline inside your retirement plan are hard to beat. Also, consider the new Roth IRAs available next year." (Income Digest)CAVEAT EMPTOR: "There is a 'string' to most investment propositions.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | July 25, 1997
HERE'S A midsummer picnic of financial goodies:"Cheerful news for EE Savings Bonds buyers. Interest is up from 85 to 90 percent of average yield on five-year Treasury securities, boosting your yield substantially." (Dick Davis Income Digest.)"Ten-year top performing stock newsletters through midyear, in order: MPT Review, New Issue Letter, BI Research, Prudent Speculator." (Hulbert Financial Digest.)"Exxon hiked its dividends 6 percent a year for over a decade and usually fares better than the market in downturns."
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | June 6, 1997
SHORT PIECES of advice:"Louis Navellier's MPT Review is in first place among all financial newsletters we tracked over the last 10 years." (Hulbert Financial Digest.)McCormick & Co. stock is listed under "Rising Stars" in S&P Outlook, June 4. "We anticipate improving conditions for spices, giving McCormick, with a 40 percent share of the market, an earnings boost in the next few quarters," the magazine says of the Maryland company."When you can see no disadvantages in a financial proposition, look harder."
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | December 6, 1995
WITH THE DOW Jones industrials, S&P 500-stock and NYSE composite averages standing this morning at record highs, many people might ask, "Where should we put our money now?"For guidance we list top-performing newsletters, stock selections and strategies from successful professionals:* TOP PERFORMERS: Here are 10-year top performing stock-picking newsletters, followed by percentage gains: MPT Review, 955; California Technology, 541; The Chartist, 340; Value Line Investment, 305; New Issues, 301. For comparison, Wilshire 5000-stock index up 297 percent, T-bills ahead 74 percent.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | September 6, 1995
Mark Hulbert may have shaved off his beard, styled his hair and traded in flannel work shirts for designer suits.But he's still the relentless investment letter tracker he was 15 years ago when he started the Hulbert Financial Digest.I first met Hulbert shortly after that publication was launched. He preached his philosophy of keeping pundits honest by constructing and following a mythical $10,000 portfolio based on each editor's recommendations. As a recent graduate of Oxford University, he was intent on quantifying advice.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | December 5, 1997
Ideas on where to put -- or not put -- your money, some from offbeat publications you won't find on newsstands."MAX OUT": "Maximize contributions to your company's retirement plan, such as 401(k). We hope you realize that Social Security won't meet all of your retirement needs. The tax-free investment growth and savings discipline inside your retirement plan are hard to beat. Also, consider the new Roth IRAs available next year." (Income Digest)CAVEAT EMPTOR: "There is a 'string' to most investment propositions.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | March 4, 1993
As long-term interest rates continued to plunge yesterday, the Dow Jones industrial average extended its rally and edged up 3.51 points to close at 3,404.04. When interest rates fall, investors take money from low-yielding money funds and maturing CDs and buy higher-yielding stocks instead.WHAT NEXT? "Recent new highs in the popular averages confirm anew that this is a bull market, now one of the longest-running uptrends in market history. Since the August, 1982 low, the S&P 500-stock index returned a stunning 545 percent from price appreciation and dividends."
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | January 3, 1995
On Friday, when the Dow Jones industrial average closed out 1994 at 3,834.44, Doris Wade of Sykesville became the winner of our 1994 Dow Jones forecasting contest with her prediction, made early last January, of 3,838.Reached at her home, Mrs. Wade, a retired Social Security employee, said, "I was watching 'Wall Street Week' last January, when Elaine Garzarelli, the high-profile portfolio manager who predicted the 1987 stock crash, said she thought 1994 would end around Dow Jones 3,838 -- so I picked it."
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | June 30, 1994
Reversing direction from a lunchtime 30-point gain, the Dow Jones industrial average sagged in afternoon trading yesterday and closed with a loss of 2.59 points, at 3,667.05.Brokers blamed a weak dollar, the possibility of higher interest rates and mutual fund "undressing," a midyear bear market procedure whereby portfolio managers dump battered stocks to make June 30 shareholder reports look more appetizing.LOOKING AHEAD: July has historically been a strong Wall Street month, rising on average 1.2 percent over the last 43 years.
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