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By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2012
The Baltimore school system spent more than $2.8 million on overtime in fiscal 2010, even though it was doubtful that employees worked all of the hours for which they were paid. Three employees earned a combined $250,000 in salaries while working for both the school system and a state agency during the same hours. And the school system failed to collect nearly $1.5 million in debt dating to 2009, including $336,000 in bonuses paid to employees who hadn't earned them. These are among dozens of findings outlined in a preliminary draft of an independent financial audit of the school system.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2014
After years of demands by activists, Baltimore's Department of Recreation and Parks has finally been audited. The audit found the agency kept erroneous financial statements, confused revenue and expenses, and lacked procedures on how employees should handle cash. The agency "did not initially provide accurate financial statements," city auditor Robert L. McCarty told the Board of Estimates on Wednesday. The agency could not figure out why its records did not match city accounting and payroll numbers, he said, and later "developed separate financial statements.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2013
Baltimore's recreation chief Bill Tyler is leaving city government to work in Montgomery County, city officials said Friday. Tyler, who earned $94,000 annually, was in charge of implementing Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's plan to consolidate recreation centers — closing and privatizing some — in an effort to cut costs while better focusing on the recreation centers that would remain open. Tyler's last day in Baltimore is Feb. 15. He will be the Southern Parks Division Chief of Montgomery Parks, officials said.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2013
Baltimore's recreation chief Bill Tyler is leaving city government to work in Montgomery County, city officials said Friday. Tyler, who earned $94,000 annually, was in charge of implementing Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's plan to consolidate recreation centers — closing and privatizing some — in an effort to cut costs while better focusing on the recreation centers that would remain open. Tyler's last day in Baltimore is Feb. 15. He will be the Southern Parks Division Chief of Montgomery Parks, officials said.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
It's taken about three years of wrangling, but Baltimore's Department of Recreation and Parks has finally turned over a year of its financial books to city auditors. "I'm not jumping up and down yet," Councilman Carl Stokes, who chairs the council's finance committee, said Wednesday. "We don't know what shape the records are in. But we're pleased that after three years we do have a turnover of books. " Comptroller Joan M. Pratt said auditors are going through the department's financial records to determine whether they are detailed enough to be audited.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2014
After years of demands by activists, Baltimore's Department of Recreation and Parks has finally been audited. The audit found the agency kept erroneous financial statements, confused revenue and expenses, and lacked procedures on how employees should handle cash. The agency "did not initially provide accurate financial statements," city auditor Robert L. McCarty told the Board of Estimates on Wednesday. The agency could not figure out why its records did not match city accounting and payroll numbers, he said, and later "developed separate financial statements.
NEWS
By Mary Alice Ernish | July 30, 2012
Recent disclosures about the failure of Baltimore City to conduct regular departmental, agency and program audits in over three decades have informed and enlivened the typically staid City Council meetings. City residents and taxpayers rightfully are seeking answers about exactly how the city spends their hard-earned tax dollars. They are looking for written proof in the form of specific departmental and agency audits to demonstrate that the city is conducting its financial affairs responsibly.
NEWS
August 22, 1999
Critics of Carroll's school board lack needed history, perspectiveAs much as I hesitate to get back into the fray, I can no longer sit back and read the allegations being made about our school system and say nothing. After 10 years as a member of the Carroll County Board of Education, perhaps I can add another perspective and a little history.Please realize that I also accept some of the responsibility and/or blame for problems the system faces that had their origin years earlier. But also understand that there are other sides to each issue than the ones presented by the newspaper or in other letters to the editor.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2012
Arguing that a proposal for increased city audits would result in duplicated efforts and wasteful spending, Baltimore Comptroller Joan Pratt and City Auditor Robert L. McCarty have submitted a letter to members of the City Council asking them to amend the hotly debated audits bill, which is set for a vote Monday evening.  "Much of the work that is performed each year ... is the same work that would be performed in the audit of agencies," Pratt...
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Jean Thompson and Thomas W. Waldron and Jean Thompson,SUN STAFF | May 10, 1996
Top officials of the Baltimore Teachers Union have hired two of their children as full-time employees on the small staffs of the two labor groups they control, prompting charges of nepotism ++ from opponents in an election to be held next week."
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
It's taken about three years of wrangling, but Baltimore's Department of Recreation and Parks has finally turned over a year of its financial books to city auditors. "I'm not jumping up and down yet," Councilman Carl Stokes, who chairs the council's finance committee, said Wednesday. "We don't know what shape the records are in. But we're pleased that after three years we do have a turnover of books. " Comptroller Joan M. Pratt said auditors are going through the department's financial records to determine whether they are detailed enough to be audited.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2012
The Baltimore school system spent more than $2.8 million on overtime in fiscal 2010, even though it was doubtful that employees worked all of the hours for which they were paid. Three employees earned a combined $250,000 in salaries while working for both the school system and a state agency during the same hours. And the school system failed to collect nearly $1.5 million in debt dating to 2009, including $336,000 in bonuses paid to employees who hadn't earned them. These are among dozens of findings outlined in a preliminary draft of an independent financial audit of the school system.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2012
Arguing that a proposal for increased city audits would result in duplicated efforts and wasteful spending, Baltimore Comptroller Joan Pratt and City Auditor Robert L. McCarty have submitted a letter to members of the City Council asking them to amend the hotly debated audits bill, which is set for a vote Monday evening.  "Much of the work that is performed each year ... is the same work that would be performed in the audit of agencies," Pratt...
NEWS
By Mary Alice Ernish | July 30, 2012
Recent disclosures about the failure of Baltimore City to conduct regular departmental, agency and program audits in over three decades have informed and enlivened the typically staid City Council meetings. City residents and taxpayers rightfully are seeking answers about exactly how the city spends their hard-earned tax dollars. They are looking for written proof in the form of specific departmental and agency audits to demonstrate that the city is conducting its financial affairs responsibly.
NEWS
August 22, 1999
Critics of Carroll's school board lack needed history, perspectiveAs much as I hesitate to get back into the fray, I can no longer sit back and read the allegations being made about our school system and say nothing. After 10 years as a member of the Carroll County Board of Education, perhaps I can add another perspective and a little history.Please realize that I also accept some of the responsibility and/or blame for problems the system faces that had their origin years earlier. But also understand that there are other sides to each issue than the ones presented by the newspaper or in other letters to the editor.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Jean Thompson and Thomas W. Waldron and Jean Thompson,SUN STAFF | May 10, 1996
Top officials of the Baltimore Teachers Union have hired two of their children as full-time employees on the small staffs of the two labor groups they control, prompting charges of nepotism ++ from opponents in an election to be held next week."
NEWS
November 25, 1991
The comptroller of Garrett County Community College has been arrested on felony theft charges after more than $3,600 in sales from a college theater production last spring was discovered missing.The comptroller, John F. Culp, submitted his resignation to the college last week. He could not be reached for comment yesterday. Mr. Culp was arrested by the Garrett County Sheriff's office Tuesday and released on his own recognizance.A financial audit earlier this month could not account for $3,651 in receipts from GCC's spring production of "The Man of La Mancha," which the drama department forwarded for deposit butwas never sent to the bank, the auditors said.
NEWS
October 10, 2012
As a Baltimore City teacher of infants and toddlers, I was appalled, frustrated and disappointed after reading your article regarding the recent financial audit of the city school system ("Schools get 'F' in finance control," Oct. 7). Providers of early intervention services to children under 3, our most vulnerable population, were recently told that there is no money for field trips this year. This will force us to charge at least $20 for a trip to the pumpkin farm in a few weeks.
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