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By LLOYD J. BUZZELL | March 12, 1991
President Bush -- the 1948 baseball captain and a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Yale -- may unwittingly preside over the unraveling of the Ivy League. This improbable scenario is, with very little attention, already unfolding.Many view the league as a powerful monolith whose stone buildings rest upon billion-dollar endowments. But the league itself, as opposed to the schools in it, is still young. And its one distinctive operational reality may not survive this winter. Negotiations are under way with the U.S. Department of Justice concerning allegations that the league's financial-aid program violates the Sherman Antitrust Act of 1890.
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NEWS
John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
More than 100 universities, including Goucher College and Loyola University Maryland, will clarify application instructions to ensure they are not violating federal law by requiring extra forms to determine eligibility for financial aid, Rep. Elijah E. Cummings said Monday. The Baltimore lawmaker and top-ranking Democrat on the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform had launched an investigation last month into whether 111 schools were requiring applicants to submit a financial aid form other than the Free Application for Federal Student Aid or had failed to make clear that only the FAFSA was necessary.
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NEWS
John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
More than 100 universities, including Goucher College and Loyola University Maryland, will clarify application instructions to ensure they are not violating federal law by requiring extra forms to determine eligibility for financial aid, Rep. Elijah E. Cummings said Monday. The Baltimore lawmaker and top-ranking Democrat on the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform had launched an investigation last month into whether 111 schools were requiring applicants to submit a financial aid form other than the Free Application for Federal Student Aid or had failed to make clear that only the FAFSA was necessary.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2014
Rep. Elijah E. Cummings of Maryland alleged this week that more than 100 universities, including Goucher College and Loyola University Maryland, are violating federal law by requiring applicants to fill out extra forms that determine their eligibility for financial aid. In a letter to U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan on Monday, Cummings said 111 universities required applicants to submit a financial aid form other than the Free Application for...
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | June 5, 2012
University of Maryland system is among 10 colleges and universities promising to make financial aid transparent to students. It's part of an Obama Administration effort to make sure incoming students understand what they're getting into. The hope is that other schools will voluntarily do the same. Today, VP Joe Biden, Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and Richard Cordray of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau are meeting with leaders of the 10 schools to announce this transparency goal beginning with the 2013-2014 school year.
NEWS
By David Wilson | October 14, 2012
Low graduation rates among African-Americans at Maryland's historically black colleges and universities present a major issue deserving of systematic analysis for solutions. This problem has been well documented by countless media outlets in HBCU communities nationwide, including in a recent Sun editorial. That editorial also challenged Maryland's HBCUs on the efforts of their faculty and administration to create and maintain cultural changes that can reverse the systemic trend of underachievement, which begins well in advance of any student's arrival at any HBCU.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2013
The across-the-board federal spending cuts known as the sequester come at a bad time for Maryland colleges. Many usually send out financial award letters this month, but they still don't have all the details on how much federal funding they will receive for certain aid programs. And even if the Department of Education gives them firm numbers before letters go out, school officials say, Congress and the White House could reach a later deal that would involve further aid changes. "For aid officers, it's extremely frustrating to have change at the last minute," said David Horne, director of financial aid at Towson University.
NEWS
May 28, 1991
The Justice Department ought to have better things to do than badger private colleges about how they distribute student financial aid. Last week the department claimed a major victory against eight Ivy League colleges and universities after bludgeoning the schools into signing a consent decree in which they agreed to stop sharing information about how much financial aid they award to offset tuitions ranging from $18,000 a year upward.Atty. Gen. Richard Thornburgh personally announced the "agreement" -- we put that word in quotes because the schools were facing a ruinous court battle with the government if they didn't knuckle under -- as a triumph of his department's "anti-trust" efforts.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2012
Students across the country are headed back to college, and millions of them will get financial aid disbursed on a debit card. The cards are convenient and save money for the schools. But these debit cards can be expensive for students, who could see their financial aid eaten up by fees. This month, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. announced it had ordered the nation's largest player in campus debit cards — Higher One — to return about $11 million to roughly 60,000 students related to fees the company charged for insufficient funds.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2012
Finding a summer camp that meets kids' needs without blowing the family budget is a challenge for working parents everywhere, but for those hit hardest by the sluggish economy, it can be especially tricky. Until this year, not many Howard County families were among that financially strapped group. But with 2012 only half over, nearly twice as many financial aid requests - for four times the amount of money - have been logged at the Y in Ellicott City compared with all of last year.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2013
Financial aid directors at Maryland colleges hope that members of Congress will return from their July 4 recess and reverse the doubling of the interest rate on new federal loans for financially needy students. "I am actually hoping they come to their senses and make the interest rate lower for our students," said Angela Hovatter, director of financial aid at Frostburg State University, where nearly half of students receive subsidized federal loans. "It's bad enough for them to find jobs in this economy and be able to pay back their student loans without adding additional money to that.
NEWS
March 22, 2013
Summer classes Registration for summer noncredit classes at Anne Arundel Community College is under way. Information: aacc.edu/noncredit. Tuition aid at AACC Financial aid is available at Anne Arundel Community College. In addition, the college has a no-fee, interest-free payment plan that allows the cost of tuition to be spread throughout a term. Payment plans are available. For information about financial aid, call 410-777-2203 or go to aacc.edu/finaid . Students can also meet with a financial aid representative on a walk-in basis at the Arnold campus, Glen Burnie Town Center, AACC at Arundel Mills or the Fort Meade Army Education Center.
NEWS
March 22, 2013
Sunday, March 24 Figure skating The Gardens Figure Skating Club presents its ninth annual spring ice show, "Mary Poppins," at 1 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. at Gardens Ice House, 13800 Old Gunpowder Road in Laurel. Shows feature more than 60 skaters, ages 3-55, performing to music from the 1964 Disney musical about an English nanny. Tickets are $10; free for children younger than 3. Information: 410-792-4947. 'Come Fly With Mickey' The Columbia Figure Skating Club presents its annual spring show at 2 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. at the Columbia Ice Rink, 5876 Thunder Hill Road.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2013
The across-the-board federal spending cuts known as the sequester come at a bad time for Maryland colleges. Many usually send out financial award letters this month, but they still don't have all the details on how much federal funding they will receive for certain aid programs. And even if the Department of Education gives them firm numbers before letters go out, school officials say, Congress and the White House could reach a later deal that would involve further aid changes. "For aid officers, it's extremely frustrating to have change at the last minute," said David Horne, director of financial aid at Towson University.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | March 1, 2013
March 1, and no sequester solution in sight. So here are some tips from the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards for federal workers, contractors and other consumers to weather government spending cuts: -     Furloughed? Reduce your expenses by about 2 percent for every week you're on furlough -  to make up for lost income. Workers should see some savings on commuting, child care and going out to lunch. -     Fewer food inspectors could mean rising food prices.
NEWS
January 26, 2003
The DE-DC-MD Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, Inc. will sponsor College Goal Sunday at 2 p.m. Feb. 9 at the Harford County Higher Education and Applied Technology Center, 1201 Technology Drive, West Wing, Aberdeen 21001. College Goal Sunday invites college-bound students to receive free professional assistance in completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). For more information on College Goal Sunday and to find a list of all locations in Maryland, Delaware and the District of Columbia, students can call 866-GO2GOAL or visit www.GO2GOAL.
NEWS
January 5, 1992
To help those students affected by the increase in tuition and fees at Dundalk Community College, the college has designated an additional $20,000 for student financial aid.Provided through the college foundation and special auxiliary fTC enterprises, the funds are available to full-time and part-time DCC students. No funds will be used from the college's operating budget. The college has also established a deferred payment plan, which will allow students to spread their tuition payments throughout the semester.
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