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BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay | April 6, 2011
It's still National Financial Literacy Month, and so the Consumer Website of the Week is Learnvest.com . The site offers a budgeting tool to show folks who earn a biweekly paycheck how much you're taking home, how much you're saving and how much discretionary income you have. There's also checklists for many of the life changes that people often experience in the spring: graduation, first job, first independent housing. The site is geared toward young women, though many of the tips could benefit people regardless of their age or gender.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | October 8, 2014
Merrill Lynch made business page headlines this year by appointing Baltimore County native Cynthia Hutchins to the newly created post of director of financial gerontology. Ms. Hutchins is charged with teaching the company's nearly 14,000 financial advisers how to talk to baby boomer clients about more than stocks and bonds - to help those planning to end their working lives understand the complexities and the realities of retiring. It is a smart move. More than 42 percent of the average financial advisor's client base is of baby boomer age, and another 36 percent is older than 67. It helps if you understand what they are experiencing.
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BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | October 14, 2011
How many times have you wished there was a knowledgeable person who could answer your specific financial question? You might end up asking a relative, friend or neighbor, but you risk that they don't know the answer, either, and steer you wrong. Well, on Oct. 29th, you can meet with a financial professional - for free. It's part of Financial Planning Days, an event scheduled in dozens of cities and trying to reach consumers who traditionally don't have access to financial advice but need it. The event will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Frederick Douglass Senior High School, 2301 Gwynns Falls Parkway in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2013
Twice this year, the city has awarded no-bid energy consulting contracts to a Baltimore company recommended by the head of the city's energy office, who was once listed as a "special partner" in the firm. Bovaro Partners LLC has received renewable-energy analysis jobs for $25,000 and $49,000. Its website lists city energy director Theodore "Ted" Atwood as a "special partner" in the financial firm. In an interview, Atwood said that the site is outdated and that he was surprised to learn he was ever listed on it. Before he worked for the city, Atwood said, he partnered with the firm on a 2004 project that was ultimately unsuccessful.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2010
Pop culture says that men are from Mars and women are from Venus. But when it comes our finances, are we really worlds apart? Many financial experts say the two sexes are different enough that women can use advice tailored to fit their style and needs. And two new ventures under way in Maryland are trying to capitalize on that.  An Owings Mills accounting and investment advisory firm recently launched a practice catering to women-owned businesses. Peg Downey, a nationally known financial planner from Chevy Chase, and two colleagues are starting to train financial advisers on how to better communicate with and serve women clients.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | March 14, 2001
John Luther Katsafanas is a garrulous guy always working an angle, whether in his office, on the phone, or on the air during his weekly WCBM radio show offering financial tips to prospective Baltimore homebuyers. Take two conversations with him this week, for starters. Katsafanas was trying to talk The Sun out of writing about his being sentenced Friday by a federal judge to serve 12 months and a day after pleading guilty to two counts of tax evasion. He had, according to sentencing papers, failed to file any tax returns for the years 1977 through 1991.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1997
The fear factor: People who aren't planning for their financial futures may be too scared to do it, according to a survey by Deloitte Consulting. The poll of 1,000 people across the country found 53 percent are scared that they don't know whom to trust when they're seeking financial advice. Those who are most scared tend to shy away from bankers, brokers and insurance agents -- probably the biggest purveyors of financial advice -- and instead talk to financial advisers or friends and relatives.
NEWS
May 28, 2013
Kudos to Erica Green for keeping on top of the Baltimore school finances ("Audit faults schools over federal funds," May 23). Many of the problems outlined in the most recent report can be traced to poor accounting procedures - including no documentation for time worked and inappropriate spending. There are systemic problems that have persisted over time and need to be addressed. The schools should be getting financial advice from the network of advisers set up to guide schools on business matters.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay | April 1, 2011
Hey everybody, National Financial Literacy Month has arrived! It's scheduled to overlap with the tail end of tax season, which is always a good time to take a moment to review your finances and set up a plan for the coming year. Think of it as spring cleaning for both your file cabinets and your wallet. Get started with information from two government resources: MyMoney.gov and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau . Celebrate this weekend at these events: --- See the Rev. Billy preach against the evils of consumerism at 7 p.m. tonight (Friday)
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | February 15, 2004
THE SECRET to successfully using a computer for financial advice? Start by figuring out what kind of help you want before sitting down at the keyboard. Do you need to learn the basics of investing? Do you want a software program that tells you whether your finances are on or off target? Or, would you rather just find a live person who can answer your questions? By narrowing your focus, you can save hours of sifting through the immense amount of financial information online. "There's a ton, and it really is hard to wade through it," said Russ Wermers, an associate professor at the University of Maryland, College Park.
NEWS
May 28, 2013
Kudos to Erica Green for keeping on top of the Baltimore school finances ("Audit faults schools over federal funds," May 23). Many of the problems outlined in the most recent report can be traced to poor accounting procedures - including no documentation for time worked and inappropriate spending. There are systemic problems that have persisted over time and need to be addressed. The schools should be getting financial advice from the network of advisers set up to guide schools on business matters.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | March 5, 2012
The Baltimore CASH Campaign is hosting its 7 th annual Money Power Day Saturday, March 10. Consumers will be able to get a free credit report, one-on-one credit counseling and help with connecting to public benefits. Also, taxpayers will be able to get free tax preparation, provided household income is less than $50,000. Troubled homeowners will receive advice on avoiding foreclosure, and prospective buyers will get free housing counseling. Plus, there will be more than 45 nonprofits, government agencies and businesses that will provide financial advice.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | October 14, 2011
How many times have you wished there was a knowledgeable person who could answer your specific financial question? You might end up asking a relative, friend or neighbor, but you risk that they don't know the answer, either, and steer you wrong. Well, on Oct. 29th, you can meet with a financial professional - for free. It's part of Financial Planning Days, an event scheduled in dozens of cities and trying to reach consumers who traditionally don't have access to financial advice but need it. The event will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Frederick Douglass Senior High School, 2301 Gwynns Falls Parkway in Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2011
When it comes to the royal wedding, no detail is off limits — the bride's weight, who's making her dress and who didn't make the guest list. Even the couple's finances are open to scrutiny. Will Prince William break with tradition and ask bride-to-be Kate Middleton to sign a prenup? While all eyes now are on the "wedding of the century," there are plenty of commoners in their 20s getting hitched every day. Their finances aren't fodder for the tabloids, although money will play a major role in their lives together.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay | April 6, 2011
It's still National Financial Literacy Month, and so the Consumer Website of the Week is Learnvest.com . The site offers a budgeting tool to show folks who earn a biweekly paycheck how much you're taking home, how much you're saving and how much discretionary income you have. There's also checklists for many of the life changes that people often experience in the spring: graduation, first job, first independent housing. The site is geared toward young women, though many of the tips could benefit people regardless of their age or gender.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay | April 1, 2011
Hey everybody, National Financial Literacy Month has arrived! It's scheduled to overlap with the tail end of tax season, which is always a good time to take a moment to review your finances and set up a plan for the coming year. Think of it as spring cleaning for both your file cabinets and your wallet. Get started with information from two government resources: MyMoney.gov and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau . Celebrate this weekend at these events: --- See the Rev. Billy preach against the evils of consumerism at 7 p.m. tonight (Friday)
BUSINESS
By Tracy Swartz and Tracy Swartz,SUN STAFF | March 28, 2004
The best advice money expert Suze Orman ever got: "Don't talk yourself into trusting anyone." When Orman was a Berkeley, Calif., waitress nearly 25 years ago, she received $50,000 to open her own restaurant. She hired a financial adviser to help her with the money, but within four months, all the money was gone. Figuring she knew more about money than so-called financial pros, Orman applied for a job at Merrill Lynch and was hired as a stockbroker trainee in 1980. Now Orman is the author of six best-selling financial books, host of her own CNBC-TV show, and a frequent guest on The Oprah Winfrey Show and Larry King Live.
BUSINESS
By Janet Kidd Stewart and Janet Kidd Stewart,Chicago Tribune | April 1, 2007
Long considered an executive perk, free financial advice may be coming to more 401(k) plans. International Business Machines Corp. unveiled plans last month to offer retirement, tax and insurance planning services to its 127,000-member U.S. work force through third parties as part of a package aimed at curbing the chill from its pension changes. Big Blue has weathered a storm of criticism and lawsuits as it switched to a cash-balance plan and later phased out its pension plan contributions for current workers.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2010
Pop culture says that men are from Mars and women are from Venus. But when it comes our finances, are we really worlds apart? Many financial experts say the two sexes are different enough that women can use advice tailored to fit their style and needs. And two new ventures under way in Maryland are trying to capitalize on that.  An Owings Mills accounting and investment advisory firm recently launched a practice catering to women-owned businesses. Peg Downey, a nationally known financial planner from Chevy Chase, and two colleagues are starting to train financial advisers on how to better communicate with and serve women clients.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2010
David Mrgich of Columbia isn't asking too much. All he wants is an objective financial adviser to review his modest portfolio and see whether it needs fine tuning. When Mrgich was younger, his father handled his investments. "The nice thing: I knew he had my best interests at heart," he says. Since then, Mrgich has been frustrated trying to find a trustworthy adviser outside the family. The 46-year-old state recycling coordinator earns around $74,000 a year and has built up a nest egg of about $100,000 — not enough to interest many financial professionals.
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