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By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | January 15, 1991
MOSCOW -- Valentin S. Pavlov, a 53-year-old economist who has served as Soviet finance minister since 1989, was named yesterday by President Mikhail S. Gorbachev to the trimmed-down job of prime minister of the U.S.S.R.Mr. Pavlov replaces Nikolai S. Ryzhkov, 61, who was considered to be on his way out even before he suffered a serious heart attack on Dec. 25. Mr. Ryzhkov was a close Gorbachev ally who became prime minister in 1985 but had over the past year become an obvious obstacle to further reform.
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NEWS
By M.G. Quibria | April 10, 2012
Few people on the street may be familiar with the World Bank. Yet, it plays a critical role in the U.S. effort to engage the world through its contribution to economic development in poor and post-conflict societies. As current World Bank President Robert Zoellick steps down this summer, the bank will soon have a new leader. In the past, as per an unwritten convention, the U.S. — the largest single majority shareholder of the bank — got to select the president. Although the bank at its core is a development institution, it was, surprisingly, never led by a development professional.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 23, 2007
JERUSALEM -- Israel's finance minister, Abraham Hirchson, said yesterday that he was leaving office for three months pending the outcome of a police investigation against him. The investigation involves suspicions that he embezzled funds before he joined the government, an Israeli police spokesman said. Ehud Olmert, Israel's prime minister, announced that he would temporarily take over the finance portfolio for Hirchson, who is a close political ally. Also yesterday, Azmi Bishara, an Israeli Arab lawmaker and leader of the Arab nationalist party Balad, resigned from Parliament in a letter sent via the Israeli Embassy in Cairo.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 23, 2007
JERUSALEM -- Israel's finance minister, Abraham Hirchson, said yesterday that he was leaving office for three months pending the outcome of a police investigation against him. The investigation involves suspicions that he embezzled funds before he joined the government, an Israeli police spokesman said. Ehud Olmert, Israel's prime minister, announced that he would temporarily take over the finance portfolio for Hirchson, who is a close political ally. Also yesterday, Azmi Bishara, an Israeli Arab lawmaker and leader of the Arab nationalist party Balad, resigned from Parliament in a letter sent via the Israeli Embassy in Cairo.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 23, 2000
TOKYO -- With the exception, perhaps, of Russia, each nation came away from the meeting of the financial leaders of the Group of 7 industrialized countries yesterday with something it wanted. For the Japanese hosts, there was a statement, albeit a muddled one, of collective concern over the potential negative effect of an excessively strong yen on the global economy. The Europeans managed to keep their currency, the euro, out of the final communique despite concerns among policy-makers outside Europe that its low value is being used to avoid taking steps for painful economic restructuring.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | January 6, 1995
NEW YORK -- International investors seemed to increase confidence in Mexico's future yesterday as the country's new finance minister, Guillermo Ortiz, told banking officials that his country could pay its debts.In a whirlwind day in New York, Mr. Ortiz also sought to reassure investors by saying that Mexico would ask the International Monetary Fund for its stamp of approval on the economic-recovery plan it announced Tuesday, after having devalued the peso in December.Addressing a standing-room-only crowd in the ballroom of the Pierre Hotel yesterday morning, the American-educated Mr. Ortiz said Mexico now had $24 billion in new international credits and monetary reserves.
NEWS
By M.G. Quibria | April 10, 2012
Few people on the street may be familiar with the World Bank. Yet, it plays a critical role in the U.S. effort to engage the world through its contribution to economic development in poor and post-conflict societies. As current World Bank President Robert Zoellick steps down this summer, the bank will soon have a new leader. In the past, as per an unwritten convention, the U.S. — the largest single majority shareholder of the bank — got to select the president. Although the bank at its core is a development institution, it was, surprisingly, never led by a development professional.
NEWS
October 8, 1994
Brazilian voters have had enough excitement for one decade. They just elected Fernando Henrique Cardoso president on the strength of the currency reform he drafted while finance minister, which since July 1 has stopped lunatic inflation dead.Monday's was the second election in a row in which Brazilians chose a free market economic reformer over the siren songs of a charismatic socialist named Lula. The first president, chosen in 1989, proved a fraud and a thief. But Mr. Cardoso, a 63-year-old professor of sociology who was exiled as a dangerous leftist by the military dictatorship of the 1960s, looks like the real thing.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 8, 2002
PARIS - President Jacques Chirac, under pressure to show results before next month's crucial legislative elections, named a conservative interim Cabinet yesterday, putting a steel magnate in charge of the economy and creating a powerful new security chief to get tough on crime. The 21-member Cabinet, proposed by Chirac's new prime minister, Jean-Pierre Raffarin, was unveiled at the Elysee Palace two days after Chirac's landslide victory in the presidential runoff election over far-right leader Jean Marie Le-Pen.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | September 18, 1992
LONDON -- Thousands of mortgage-holders, wage earners and small business owners were saved yesterday from the pain, and in some cases financial ruin, that Prime Minister John Major was prepared to inflict on them in his quest to save the pound from devaluation.Now it is Mr. Major, the Conservative Party leader, who faces the pain, the humiliation of failure, and possibly political ruin.The Labor Party's shadow finance minister, Gordon Brown, declared that the government's "credibility was shot down in flames" by the events of what is now being called "Black Wednesday."
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 12, 2006
MOSCOW -- Finance ministers from the Group of Eight industrialized nations, warning that "high and volatile energy prices" pose a threat to global economic growth, called yesterday for stepped-up efforts to ensure a stable worldwide energy supply. Hosted by Russian President Vladimir V. Putin in a hotel near the Kremlin, the G-8 finance ministers meeting issued a communique calling for greater cooperation among oil producers, consumers and private industry. Maintenance of solid economic growth requires an improved market-oriented approach to providing sufficient oil, gas and other energy resources, it said.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 5, 2004
JERUSALEM - Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon fired two far-right Cabinet ministers yesterday to secure passage tomorrow of a resolution to evacuate Jewish settlements from the Gaza Strip and part of the West Bank. The firings, which could bring down the government and force new elections, come after Sharon was unable to persuade three of his fellow Likud ministers to back a compromise version of his plan. He now has a one-vote majority among the 21 remaining ministers. Both fired ministers, Benny Elon and Avigdor Lieberman from the National Union Party, accused Sharon of usurping democracy by dismissing elected members of government for disagreeing with his policies.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 4, 2003
DUBLIN, Ireland - Cigarette tax, up 30 cents starting today, pushing the price above $6 a pack. Ireland's wealthiest people will pay about $2,000 more a year for welfare programs for the country's worst-off. Gasoline tax? That's increasing 7 cents per liter immediately. And to save the government money, no more retiring for public workers until they turn 65. Ireland's finance minister, Charlie McGreevy, ticked off the tax increases and spending cuts one by one yesterday as he stood before lawmakers to outline the country's 2004 budget.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2002
Afghanistan's new leader selected Ashraf Ghani, an adjunct professor with the Johns Hopkins University, as his finance minister yesterday, assigning him the herculean task of rebuilding the country's shattered economy. The appointment, made by Hamid Karzai and approved along with the rest of his new Cabinet by the grand council, comes in addition to another daunting task Ghani had already assumed: coordinating the hundreds of millions of dollars in financial help promised to rebuild Afghanistan.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 8, 2002
PARIS - President Jacques Chirac, under pressure to show results before next month's crucial legislative elections, named a conservative interim Cabinet yesterday, putting a steel magnate in charge of the economy and creating a powerful new security chief to get tough on crime. The 21-member Cabinet, proposed by Chirac's new prime minister, Jean-Pierre Raffarin, was unveiled at the Elysee Palace two days after Chirac's landslide victory in the presidential runoff election over far-right leader Jean Marie Le-Pen.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 23, 2000
TOKYO -- With the exception, perhaps, of Russia, each nation came away from the meeting of the financial leaders of the Group of 7 industrialized countries yesterday with something it wanted. For the Japanese hosts, there was a statement, albeit a muddled one, of collective concern over the potential negative effect of an excessively strong yen on the global economy. The Europeans managed to keep their currency, the euro, out of the final communique despite concerns among policy-makers outside Europe that its low value is being used to avoid taking steps for painful economic restructuring.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 5, 2004
JERUSALEM - Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon fired two far-right Cabinet ministers yesterday to secure passage tomorrow of a resolution to evacuate Jewish settlements from the Gaza Strip and part of the West Bank. The firings, which could bring down the government and force new elections, come after Sharon was unable to persuade three of his fellow Likud ministers to back a compromise version of his plan. He now has a one-vote majority among the 21 remaining ministers. Both fired ministers, Benny Elon and Avigdor Lieberman from the National Union Party, accused Sharon of usurping democracy by dismissing elected members of government for disagreeing with his policies.
BUSINESS
By James Sterngold and James Sterngold,New York Times News Service | October 4, 1991
TOKYO -- Ryutaro Hashimoto, an ambitious politician who served as finance minister during two exceptionally turbulent years, announced yesterday that he would resign to take responsibility for Japan's series of damaging financial scandals.Mr. Hashimoto offered his resignation to Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu but, as expected, was asked to remain in his post until after a meeting of world financial leaders that begins next week in Bangkok, Thailand. His experience over the last two years was considered important at this critical meeting, even though he would be a lame duck.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 29, 1999
MOSCOW -- Loyalty to Boris N. Yeltsin exacts its toll, as Russia's new prime minster, Sergei Stepashin, has been finding out. Stepashin may be in charge of the Cabinet, as he felt it necessary to point out earlier this week, but that doesn't mean he has much of a say in how it's put together.Stepashin has been burdened by Yeltsin with a deputy premier, Nikolai Aksyonenko, who acts as though he didn't hear the "deputy" part when he was offered the job. The other deputy premier, Mikhail Zadornov, was Stepashin's man, and the thinking was he might balance Aksyonenko.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 26, 1998
MOSCOW -- No sooner had a Russian Cabinet finally been put together yesterday -- 33 days after the last one was dismissed at the start of the economic collapse -- than one of its most prominent members said he was quitting in disgust.Alexander Shokhin, deputy prime minister for economic affairs, had just finished talks with a delegation from the International Monetary Fund when he announced that he was walking out. He had received news that he had lost a drawn-out, behind-the-scenes struggle over who would be named finance minister.
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