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By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2010
Annapolis' finance director, whose tenure was marked by the still-unsolved theft of more than $150,000 in checks and cash from a city hall vault, is retiring after 26 years in city government, officials announced Monday. Timothy Elliott, who faced criticism for not immediately informing Mayor Joshua J. Cohen of the June theft, plans to leave his post Sept. 1 to pursue a job in the private sector. No arrests have been made in the theft. Elliott declined to comment. Cohen spokesman Phillip McGowan said Elliott was not forced to retire or resign.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
Baltimore finance director Harry Black is resigning to become the city manager of Cincinnati - the latest of at least six high-level departures from City Hall in a year. A Park Heights native, Black had been the city's finance director for about 21/2 years. He will be replaced by Finance Department deputy Henry Raymond, according to the mayor's office. Black's last day in Baltimore will be Aug. 20. His new job is pending approval of the Cincinnati City Council. “I would like to thank Mr. Black for his dedicated service to my administration and the City of Baltimore,” Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said in a statement.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
Baltimore finance director Harry Black is resigning to become the city manager of Cincinnati - the latest of at least six high-level departures from City Hall in a year. A Park Heights native, Black had been the city's finance director for about 21/2 years. He will be replaced by Finance Department deputy Henry Raymond, according to the mayor's office. Black's last day in Baltimore will be Aug. 20. His new job is pending approval of the Cincinnati City Council. “I would like to thank Mr. Black for his dedicated service to my administration and the City of Baltimore,” Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said in a statement.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2013
City officials on Monday will consider issuing $35 million in bonds for the massive Harbor Point development - among the final steps before construction can begin on the $1.8 billion waterfront project. Such bond issues by the city's Board of Finance, which manages Baltimore's debt, are typically considered routine. But some are urging the board not to approve the financing until all environmental concerns associated with the former chemical plant site are alleviated. The Harbor Point development team has received approval from the Maryland Department of the Environment to begin preliminary construction, but hasn't yet gotten permission to penetrate the cap containing chemicals in the soil.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 19, 2005
Robert W. Ginn, former director of finance at Mount Washington Pediatric Hospital and several other area hospitals, died of complications from liver cancer April 12 at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The longtime Towson resident was 74. Mr. Ginn was born and raised in Scarsdale, N.Y., and graduated in 1947 from Eastern Military Academy in Stamford, Conn. He enlisted in the Navy Medical Corps in 1947, and he served as a shipboard medical officer. He attained the rank of lieutenant junior grade and graduated in 1955 from the Naval School of Hospital Administration at Bethesda Naval Hospital.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 23, 2004
Mayor Martin O'Malley presented his retiring finance director, Peggy J. Watson, with the first Richard A. Lidinsky Sr. Award yesterday for excellence in public service. Friends and family members of Watson and Lidinsky gathered in the City Hall rotunda to honor both longtime public employees for their commitment. Lidinsky died last December. He had served as deputy comptroller under eight Baltimore mayors. A plaque in his honor was installed on the rotunda wall. Watson's name will be the first added to the plaque.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1996
Baltimore's finance director yesterday criticized a City Council proposal to balance next year's budget by speeding cuts in municipal employment through early retirements, saying it would create a "chaotic environment."But room for compromise apparently existed between the council plan to cut 2,480 jobs in two years and Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's proposal to keep the window for early retirements open for five years.In a letter yesterday to 3rd District Councilman Martin O'Malley, chairman of the Taxation and Finance Committee, finance director William R. Brown Jr. said the number of cuts represent 22 percent of those covered by the Employees Retirement System.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1999
Baltimore Mayor-elect Martin O'Malley announced his first Cabinet picks yesterday, selecting his city solicitor and finance director, but will likely be inaugurated Tuesday without having filled several key posts.O'Malley chose Thurman Zollicoffer, a white-collar criminal defense lawyer, as the city's top attorney. O'Malley selected Peggy J. Watson, a former deputy director in the city Finance Department, as his finance director.Zollicoffer, 37, a lifelong Baltimore resident, worked with O'Malley as a state prosecutor and is a partner in the law firm of Whiteford, Taylor & Preston.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1995
Baltimore County Finance Director James R. Gibson Jr. is to retire Jan. 5, and his job will be left vacant for at least a few months as a cost-cutting measure.Budget Director Fred Homan will supervise finance, at least until it is clear how much income the county will lose in state and federal budget cuts this winter, County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger III said.Mr. Gibson, 50, has been finance director since 1988 and a county employee for 28 years. He said he was proud to have worked his way up to department head after starting his county career as a planning and zoning technician.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2003
Westminster's new money man finds that managing a $20 million-plus municipal budget isn't so different from working under the hood of a car. Crunching numbers and restoring a 1977 Corvette both challenge Joseph D. Urban to solve problems within highly complex systems. "It's the analytical process," said Urban, who officially takes over responsibility tomorrow for the city's books from 25-year veteran Stephen V. Dutterer. "I love learning how engines and mechanics work and being able to fix it."
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
The city is looking for ways to ease the property tax burden on hundreds of homeowners who received unexpectedly high bills last month, officials said, as Baltimore reckons with past errors in a popular credit for historic renovations. The tax increases, which can be in the hundreds or thousands of dollars, have hit more than 300 people who had been underpaying because of miscalculations. Henry J. Raymond, deputy director of the Finance Department, cautioned that the city's options are limited.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2013
When Baltimore Finance Director Harry E. Black revealed Wednesday that the city could not legally recoup more than $1.5 million in erroneous tax breaks from commercial property owners, he promised to provide the legal analysis on which he based the decision. He then blocked the release of a 12-page opinion by city lawyers laying out the rationale . The opinion could explain why the city does not think it can rebill property owners to recover excessive tax discounts granted for historic rehabs, even as it has charged many homeowners back taxes for a different kind of discount rife with problems - the homestead tax credit.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2013
Baltimore's spending panel on Wednesday approved a payment of $424,000 to a financial consultant to monitor the city's money-saving efforts. The action by the Board of Estimates would bring the total payments to Public Financial Management Inc., a Philadelphia-based firm, to more than $1 million. The consultant was hired to help design the city's 10-year financial plan that includes a new trash collection fee, a smaller city workforce and cuts to employee benefits as a way to deal with a projected $750 million, 10-year budget shortfall.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2012
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has hired a new director of recreation and parks, choosing an experienced manager who has headed similar agencies in three cities. Ernest W. Burkeen Jr., 64, who previously ran recreation and parks departments in Miami, Fort Lauderdale and Detroit, will begin in Baltimore Dec. 17, the mayor is scheduled to announce Tuesday. "Ernest Burkeen is a nationally respected leader in his field with a great track record of success improving parks and recreational opportunities for urban communities," Rawlings-Blake said in a statement.
EXPLORE
July 19, 2012
Erickson Living named Clara Parker executive director of Charlestown, the continuing care retirement community in Catonsville. The Severna Park resident will be responsible for daily operations on the 110-acre campus on Maiden Choice Lane, where more than 2,000 residents are served by 1,100 employees. Parker had worked as vice president-regional finance director for Erickson Living communities throughout the country. In 2005, she was named director of finance at Oak Crest.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2012
With a half-dozen key resignations at Baltimore City Hall, some political observers say they're concerned about the recent loss of institutional knowledge in Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's administration. Since the fall, the city's budget director, development chief, parks director and the mayor's chief of staff have left or announced plans to leave. They were joined this week by Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III and the mayor's liaison to the Police Department, Sheryl Goldstein.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | September 29, 2004
The city's Board of Estimates is set to hire an executive search firm to find a replacement for retiring finance director Peggy J. Watson, whose impending departure was inadvertently revealed by City Hall yesterday. The board's draft agenda for today's meeting features an item that states that "the department of Finance will soon require the services of a new Director of Finance." The item requests that the board spend $25,000 to hire an executive search firm to hire Watson's replacement.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | May 1, 2009
Baltimore has even more surplus money than previously thought: an extra $13 million that can be used to stem looming budget cuts, the city finance director said yesterday in a disclosure that caught City Council members by surprise. The news came during a terse oversight hearing called by council members to determine ways to use a previously disclosed $40 million surplus to alleviate reductions to pools, recreation centers and police and fire overtime. Finance Director Edward J. Gallagher said, as he has in the past, that the found $40 million must be used to reduce planned city borrowing.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | February 29, 2012
A city council subcommittee on Wednesday approved, 4-0, the nomination of Harry E. Black as Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's nominee for city finance director. The entire council must now vote on Black's nomination. During the hourlong hearing of the Executive Appointments committee, there were no speakers who voiced opposition to Black's nomination, despite the tumultuous three years Black spent as the top financial official in Richmond, Va. During that time, he oversaw the forced ejection of the school board from City Hall and was sued by the Richmond City Council.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2012
Frank A. Mucha, an accountant who served as the first chief of the city Department of Finance's Bureau of Accounting Operations, died Jan. 6 from complications of pancreatic cancer at his Ellicott City home. He was 84. Mr. Mucha was born and raised in East Baltimore and graduated in 1945 from Calvert Hall College High School. While working, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1958 in accounting from the University of Baltimore, and also achieved his certified public accountant certification that year.
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