Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFinance Committee
IN THE NEWS

Finance Committee

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan | February 11, 2000
The NFL got its first look yesterday at prospective Ravens owner Stephen J. Bisciotti. "I was very positively impressed. He was the prototype of the perfect NFL owner in my opinion," said Robert Kraft, owner of the New England Patriots and chairman of the league's finance committee. Bisciotti appeared yesterday before the committee at a meeting in West Palm Beach, Fla. Kraft described it as a "get-acquainted" session that included Bisciotti's wife. Kraft said Bisciotti is passionate about football, the Baltimore community, and his family.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 10, 2014
I want to congratulate reporter Luke Broadwater and his contributing colleagues on their article "Cardin missed nearly 75% of votes in committee" (May 7). One of the most important obligations of a free press is oversight of government and its elected officials. The majority of the public would not know what is happening in the legislature without reading the news reports or watching TV news programs. However, I am offended by the politically motivated comments of Ways and Means Committee Chairwoman Del. Sheila Hixson and House Speaker Michael E. Busch, who both minimized the importance of committee attendance.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | March 14, 1999
PHOENIX -- Commissioner Paul Tagliabue said last night that progress has been made in talks with Howard Milstein on his proposal to buy the Washington Redskins, but there is still no deal to present to the owners.After the powerful finance committee delayed making a recommendation, Tagliabue said: "We really have made some substantial progress in the last 72 hours. We'll see if we can get something nailed down that we can present to the membership [at the annual owners' meeting this week]
NEWS
April 6, 2014
Lots of local children either attended or watched the Opening Day ceremonies for the Orioles last week as the team started its season at Camden Yards, but a group of youngsters from Fort Meade had a particularly nice vantage point for the festivities: the field OriolesREACH, the community outreach branch of the ballclub, arranged for 80 youths to line the orange carpet holding Orioles flags during player introductions before the game against the...
NEWS
June 22, 1997
CONGRATULATIONS to a unanimous Senate Finance Committee that had the political guts to attack fundamental long-range financial problems of the Medicare system. It proposed raising the eligibility age from 65 to 67 in 30 years and, more explosively, means-testing so the affluent elderly are no longer subsidized by working-age families, some of whom cannot afford health insurance even as they pay Medicare payroll taxes.Predictably, the American Association of Retired People blasted the proposal as "unworkable" and a threat to turn a social insurance plan into a form of welfare that would undercut its popular support.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and David L. Greene and Karen Hosler and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 12, 2001
WASHINGTON - Moving quickly to deliver the tax cuts pushed by President Bush and endorsed by Congress, the Senate's chief Republican and Democratic tax-writers offered a plan yesterday calling for income rate cuts - worth about $300 per taxpayer - retroactive to the start of the year. The bipartisan legislation, which the Senate Finance Committee is expected to approve next week, includes a broad range of other benefits for families, businesses, students and retirees, to be phased in over the next decade at a cost of $1.35 trillion.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2002
The average Westminster homeowner would pay about $60 more in property taxes next fiscal year under a proposal to help the Carroll County seat meet the needs of a growing population. The Common Council's finance committee has proposed raising the tax rate - the first increase in five years - to balance a $12 million budget for fiscal 2003, which begins July 1. The increase would mean about $500,000 in additional revenue, said L. Gregory Pecoraro, the finance committee chairman. Trying to balance the proposed budget, city officials have slashed $2.1 million in spending - mostly for public works projects such as road improvements, a skate park expansion, and street lighting.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Howard Libit and Michael Dresser and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2002
THE SENATE of Maryland has been around for more than 350 years, so the departure of one senator doesn't make much of an impact in the grand scheme of things. Some senators, however, leave a void that is felt many years after they move on. They become part of Senate lore -- Jack Cade, Fred Malkus, Harry "Soft Shoes" McGuirk. And now Tommy Bromwell. The Baltimore County Democrat, who is leaving to become head of the Injured Workers' Insurance Fund, has been a commanding figure in the Senate during the eight years he has served as chairman of the powerful Finance Committee.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan | February 12, 2000
Prospective Ravens owner Stephen J. Bisciotti will likely win the unanimous recommendation of the NFL's influential finance committee in his bid to buy the team, predicted Giants co-owner P. Robert Tisch yesterday. "He's a first-class guy. We were very impressed with him," Tisch said, the day after Bisciotti appeared before the finance committee in Florida. Tisch is a member of the finance committee. The committee asked Bisciotti and current Ravens owner Art Modell to wrap up final negotiations on the sales agreement by Friday.
NEWS
February 25, 2000
The Senate Finance Committee overwhelmingly approved yesterday union-backed legislation intended to improve wages for school construction workers. The bill now heads to the full Senate. The Glendening administration bill would require that workers on many school construction and renovation contracts be paid the "prevailing wage" in their region, as is the case with other state public works projects. A number of Republicans call it payback for the support unions have given Glendening in his election campaigns.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
The House of Delegates voted Friday to raise Maryland's minimum wage to $10.10 an hour over the next three years, setting up a potential fight over whether to guarantee future increases by tying the rate to inflation. Delegates voted 89-46 for the increase after an hourlong debate — the first time the House has approved raising the base pay since 2006. Supporters argued that the wealthiest state in the nation could afford to boost the living standards of its poorest workers, while opponents warned that the move would hurt small businesses and cost jobs among the people that the legislation is meant to help.
NEWS
February 18, 2014
At first, leaders of the General Assembly were promising as many hearings as it would take to get to the bottom of the failure of Maryland's health care exchange website. Then they decided to put off questions about what went wrong until an audit that wouldn't be completed until after this summer's gubernatorial primary, and instead to task a special committee with monitoring progress going forward. Now they're shifting gears again. Two committee chairmen are asking legislative auditors to review documents detailing the lead-up to the website's botched October launch and to report back before the General Assembly adjourns in April.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2013
New Annapolis Mayor Mike Pantelides got his first taste of controversy as he presided over his first city council meeting on Monday. Three of the eight aldermen opposed the committee assignments proposed by Pantelides, a Republican who won a 59-vote victory last month. Alderwoman Sheila Finlayson, Alderman Kenneth Kirby and Alderwoman Rhonda Pindell Charles -- all Democrats -- spoke against Finlayson not being assigned to the Finance Committee, which she served on during the last term.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2013
Robert L. Stocksdale, a real estate attorney who served several state commissions and committees on issues of mortgage financing, died from a brain hemorrhage July 7 at Sinai Hospital. The Mays Chapel resident was 85. Born in Baltimore, he lived on Roland Avenue and Keswick Road in Hampden as a child. The son of a father who was an attorney and a homemaker mother, he spent summers on the Chesapeake Bay on the family's Calvert County tobacco farm. He was a 1946 graduate of Baltimore Polytechnic Institute.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2013
Senate Majority Leader Rob Garagiola, who was elected to the Maryland Senate in 2002 as its youngest member and appeared destined for higher office, said Thursday that he is leaving the General Assembly to return to private life. Garagiola, a Montgomery County Democrat, said his resignation will take effect Sept. 1. Under Maryland's Constitution, he will be replaced by a candidate chosen by his party's local central committee. Now 40, Garagiola was 30 when he defeated the last Republican senator to represent increasingly Democratic Montgomery County.
NEWS
April 9, 2013
City of Annapolis Alderman Richard E. Israel announced this week that he's resigning from the City Council, effective immediately. Israel told the council he's moving out of his Shaw Street home into the Ginger Cove Community, a community in Annapolis that's not in the ward he was elected to represent. He said he's resigning now, rather than when he moves in May, so that his successor will be able to participate in upcoming city budget deliberations. Israel, who represented the city's First Ward, thanked his colleagues on the council, and also, "the voters of the First Ward for twice entrusting me with this office.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | June 10, 1994
Deliberations on the 1995 Annapolis operating budget are in disarray after the resignation of the City Council's finance committee chairwoman and word that the majority of council apparently wants to go back to the budget the mayor proposed more than a month ago.As a result of the confusion, no one is certain which of two budget plans will be discussed when a public hearing resumes on Monday."
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino | March 11, 1999
The NFL announced publicly for the first time yesterday that it has problems with the financing of Edward Milstein's bid to buy the Washington Redskins, raising the specter that the league may risk a lawsuit by rejecting his $800 million bid.Responding to reports that Milstein has altered his financing plan to satisfy NFL requirements at a Monday meeting with commissioner Paul Tagliabue, the league said in a statement: "Despite media reports to the contrary,...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
Herbert W. "Bill" Acker, a retired Price Waterhouse Coopers LLD regional managing partner, died Friday of kidney cancer at his Stone House Farm in Churchville. He was 70. Herbert William Acker — who was known as H. William "Bill" Acker — was the son of a Ford-New Holland worker and a postmistress. He was born and raised in Intercourse, Pa., where he graduated from Pequea High School. After earning a bachelor's degree in 1963 in accounting from Lebanon Valley College, he began his accounting career at Price Waterhouse in New York City.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2013
James Gabriel Thompson, a retired savings and loan association president, died of cerebral vascular disease Jan. 29 at Oak Crest Village. The former Guilford resident was 84. Born in Baltimore and raised in Gwynn Oak, he was the son of Stephen Thompson, a Baltimore & Ohio Railroad chief clerk, and the former Sue Jones, a homemaker. He was a 1945 Loyola High School graduate. After serving in the Coast Guard in Washington, he earned a degree in business at what is now Loyola University Maryland.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.