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By PHIL JACKMAN | January 25, 1995
Reading Time: Two Minutes.After observing what has been going on in baseball and hockey the last several months, taking a spot behind "The check is in the mail" among the three biggest lies ever uttered is, "That's our final offer, take it or leave it!"* Nine underdogs have won the previous 28 Super Bowls with the biggest, of course, being the 18-point 'dog Jets against the Colts in III. The Vikings were a 12-point favorite over the Chiefs the very next year (1970) when, in the famous words of Kansas City coach Hank Stram, "This [23-7]
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SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
There was a sense throughout the industry that the Orioles' decision to back away from closer Grant Balfour after his failed physical in December could adversely affect the club going forward. That reality apparently played a part in them not landing veteran starter Bronson Arroyo, who signed a two-year deal with the Arizona Diamondbacks on Friday. Arroyo will get a guaranteed $23.5 million over two years -- $9.5 million each season and an $11 million option in 2016 that includes a $4.5 million buyout.
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NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | November 28, 1990
At least one ship line planned to begin diverting cargo away from the Port of Baltimore today, after dockworker union leaders rejected a contract proposal that management termed its "best and final" offer.Leaders of the Baltimore District Council of the International Longshoremen's Association, bargaining for four of the port's five ILA locals, yesterday voted not to submit the seven-page contract offer to their membership for a vote.There is time for further negotiating, but if neither side blinks, a strike could idle the docks when the current contract expires Friday at midnight.
NEWS
December 16, 2009
Members of the Baltimore police union voted Tuesday night to accept the city's final contract offer. According to Robert F. Cherry, president of the city's Fraternal Order of Police, members turned out in "overwhelming numbers" to accept the contract. The vote followed months of negotiations that produced a deal that would cut $5 million from the police budget and bring long-sought changes in shift schedules. Under the agreement, officers will no longer be forced to work six-day weeks.
NEWS
By John H. Gormley Jr | November 28, 1990
Leaders of the dockworkers union in the port of Baltimore rejected management's "final" contract offer yesterday, Maurice C. Byan, the head negotiator for waterfront management said yesterday, increasing the possibility of strike when the current local contract expires at midnight Friday.Officials of the International Longshoremen's Association notified him yesterday that they did not intend to submit the offer to their members for a ratification vote, Mr. Byan said. "We're still hoping they'll reconsider our offer," he said.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2000
PALM BEACH, Fla. -- Qadry Ismail's final answer yesterday was that he was taking the Ravens' final offer. Pat Moriarty, the Ravens' chief negotiator, said that Tony Agnone, the agent for the wide receiver, called him yesterday at the league's annual March meetings to accept the team's four-year, $8 million offer. The papers for the agreement in principle will be signed after Moriarty returns to Baltimore. "We're glad to have it done," said coach Brian Billick, who will have four members of his receiving corps under contract once Ismail signs.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2000
Qadry Ismail hopes the Ravens' final offer isn't quite as final as one of Regis Philbin's final answers. According to the wide receiver's agent, Tony Agnone, Ismail was given what the Ravens said was their final offer this week -- a four-year, $8 million deal with a $1.3 million signing bonus. Agnone said the problem was the way the deal was structured, with $5 million of it in the final two years. He was happy with the $8 million total package, but prefers more upfront money, with a $2 million signing bonus.
BUSINESS
December 16, 1994
Offer raised for USA MobileMetrocall Inc. sweetened its unsolicited buyout offer yesterday for USA Mobile Communications Holding Inc. by $18.5 million, and said that was its "best and final offer."A merger would create the nation's second-largest paging company.Cincinnati-based USA Mobile on Dec. 9 had rejected Metrocall's original $384 million offer.
SPORTS
December 31, 1998
NBA games lost yesterday: 13.Total games missed: 401.Earliest estimated date season can start: Feb. 1.Projected player salary losses (through Feb. 1): More than $500 million.Negotiations: Nothing scheduled, but the union is planning to make its own "final" offer to the owners.Today's best canceled game: Nets at Wizards. The only game scheduled as the rest of the league's 29 teams were given a night off for New Year's Eve.Pub Date: 12/31/98
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
There was a sense throughout the industry that the Orioles' decision to back away from closer Grant Balfour after his failed physical in December could adversely affect the club going forward. That reality apparently played a part in them not landing veteran starter Bronson Arroyo, who signed a two-year deal with the Arizona Diamondbacks on Friday. Arroyo will get a guaranteed $23.5 million over two years -- $9.5 million each season and an $11 million option in 2016 that includes a $4.5 million buyout.
NEWS
By Stefen Lovelace and Stefen Lovelace,SUN REPORTER | December 3, 2007
This weekend is the reason every high school football player decided to put on shoulder pads, cleats and a jersey. M&T Bank Stadium will play host to the high school football state finals, and five undefeated area teams have qualified for the biggest games of the year. The Class 3A championship game will take place at 7 p.m. Thursday with No. 5 Hereford (13-0) looking for its fourth state title and first since 2002. The Bulls will take on Damascus (12-1), a team that is no stranger to playoff football either.
BUSINESS
By Joseph Menn and Joseph Menn,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 2, 2004
Three weeks after Oracle Corp. Chief Executive Officer Larry Ellison testified that he might lower a hostile bid for PeopleSoft Inc., Oracle raised it 14 percent and set a Nov. 19 deadline for its smaller rival to accept. The bid, made yesterday, is for $8.8 billion, or $24 a share, up from $7.7 billion, or $21 a share. Oracle executives described it as their "best and final" offer. They said they would abandon the 17-month quest for PeopleSoft if a majority of shares weren't tendered by the deadline.
BUSINESS
By Kenneth Harney | September 5, 2004
IT HAS BEEN ONE of the longest-running tax sagas for American homeowners, especially those in high-appreciation real estate markets: How do you handle capital gains taxes when you profitably sell your home earlier than the two-year minimum ownership-and-use deadline? Congress passed the basic tax code changes establishing a streamlined home-sale capital gains computation system in 1997 and 1998. Now the Internal Revenue Service finally has gotten around to issuing regulations that tell early sellers how much of their sale profits they can shelter from the federal capital gains bite -- if indeed they get to shelter anything.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 27, 2004
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra poured the last of the summer wine Friday night, to the familiar strains of George Gershwin and Aaron Copland. This finale of the first Summer Wine and MusicFest offered one more geographic focus - the Americas - to round out earlier explorations of French, Italian and Spanish sounds and sips. As an exercise in armchair traveling, Friday's event at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, like the earlier ones, offered pleasant diversions. Too bad there weren't more passengers.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2002
Potentially damaging testimony by executives of Trigon Healthcare Inc. may be an effort to "throw a monkey wrench" into CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield's deal to be sold to a competitor, William L. Jews, CareFirst's chief executive officer, said yesterday. CareFirst, the area's largest insurer, is seeking approval from regulators to convert to a for-profit operation and be acquired. Trigon bid $1.3 billion for CareFirst, but CareFirst's board elected to accept a matching offer from WellPoint Health Networks Inc. of California.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2000
Gov. Parris N. Glendening turned up the heat yesterday on negotiations with Baltimore education officials, saying the state has made its final offer of aid to city schools and is prepared to head into court next week if that proposal is rejected. Glendening has offered to give the city $30 million of the $49 million in extra aid it is seeking for the coming school year, with a pledge to do all he can to provide the entire $49 million for the 2001-2002 school year, according to a spokesman for the governor.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2000
PALM BEACH, Fla. -- Qadry Ismail's final answer yesterday was that he was taking the Ravens' final offer. Pat Moriarty, the Ravens' chief negotiator, said that Tony Agnone, the agent for the wide receiver, called him yesterday at the league's annual March meetings to accept the team's four-year, $8 million offer. The papers for the agreement in principle will be signed after Moriarty returns to Baltimore. "We're glad to have it done," said coach Brian Billick, who will have four members of his receiving corps under contract once Ismail signs.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2000
Qadry Ismail hopes the Ravens' final offer isn't quite as final as one of Regis Philbin's final answers. According to the wide receiver's agent, Tony Agnone, Ismail was given what the Ravens said was their final offer this week -- a four-year, $8 million deal with a $1.3 million signing bonus. Agnone said the problem was the way the deal was structured, with $5 million of it in the final two years. He was happy with the $8 million total package, but prefers more upfront money, with a $2 million signing bonus.
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