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By Elise T. Chisolm | December 3, 1991
SHE'S DYING of cancer, and she wanted to talk to me about the best seller ''Final Exit'' by Derek Humphrey. Oddly enough, I had just finished reading the book.The book deals with the practicalities of assisted suicide and self-deliverance for the dying.My friend has about six months, the cancer has spread throughout her body. She is 78.Many of my friends have had cancer, most of them have not died. But this friend is in constant pain and she wants to have control of her ''final exit.'' She has written a living will and has made sure she will not be kept alive by artificial means.
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By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2013
COLLEGE PARKĀ  - A year ago, coaches representing the University of Maryland's 19 athletic teams lined up across the back wall of a meeting room in the student union, all dressed in red. The plan, according to an internal email, was to present a "visual display of unity" behind university President Wallace Loh as he publicly announced the school's move to the Big Ten Conference after 60 years in the Atlantic Coast Conference. But the reality is that two of the school's most prominent coaches had reacted strongly against the decision in private, while others were stunned, according to interviews and emails obtained by The Baltimore Sun under a Public Information Act request.
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By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1997
A leader of the right-to-die movement said in Baltimore last night that the medical establishment should help people die if they are near death and ask for assistance.But an expert in medical ethics countered that argument and said such practices could lead to abuses, especially in a climate of high health care costs.Those were the polar views of Derek Humphry, author of "Final Exit," the best-selling book about assisted suicide for the dying, and founder of the Hemlock Society, and Dr. Arthur Caplan, professor of bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
June 8, 2010
As the research analyst for a national disability rights group that opposes legalization of euthanasia and assisted suicide, I am all too familiar with the Final Exit Network (FEN). I think it's important that readers – and the editors – know that Jerry Dincin misled readers on several points in his essay published on June 7 ("Death with dignity"). Mr. Dincin claims that authorities are "persecuting" FEN members in Georgia and Arizona. That is a gross distortion. The authorities in Georgia and Arizona initiated investigations after complaints by concerned relatives that the apparent suicides of their loved ones were aided and encouraged by FEN members.
FEATURES
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,Universal Press Syndicate | September 2, 1991
Given the pervasive fear of a drawn-out death, perhaps it's not surprising that a how-to book on suicide has shot to the top of the New York Times best-seller list for hardcover advice books."
NEWS
By Charlyne Varkonyi | August 10, 1991
"Final Exit," Derek Humphry's controversial do-it-yourself suicide primer, is ringing up sales equal to Tom Clancy's new techno-thriller in some Towson bookstores, but elsewhere store managers say sales are moderate."Right now the book is neck and neck with Clancy," said Dee Peeler, book buyer for Greetings & Readings in Towson. "We get an order for one and an order for the other. I think it is being bought by a lot of medical professionals and people who are just curious. But I don't think we are selling it to people who want to put the advice into practice."
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | February 28, 2009
Two Baltimore men indicted in a Georgia assisted-suicide investigation waived their right to an extradition hearing yesterday morning, hoping to accelerate their release from custody as they await trial. Attorneys for Dr. Lawrence D. Egbert, 81, and Nicholas Alec Sheridan, 60, who were arrested Wednesday in an eight-state probe of the Marietta, Ga.-based Final Exit Network, asked that the men be allowed to transport themselves to Georgia, where authorities say they plan to allow the men to be released on $60,000 bond.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 7, 1993
A popular suicide manual has had a noticeable effect on the methods people use to kill themselves, research has shown.The book, "Final Exit," recommends that terminally ill people wishing to end their lives rely on asphyxiation, which the book calls "self-deliverance via the plastic bag," combined with drugs for sedation.In the year after the book's publication in March 1991, the number of suicides by asphyxiation rose to 33 in New York City, a new study has shown, compared with eight in the year before the manual came out.The study will appear in the New England Journal of Medicine.
FEATURES
By Gerri Kobren | October 29, 1991
Suicide -- it has always been a word spoken in hushed whispers with averted eyes. Not something respectable people talked about. Certainly not anything the medical profession would become involved with.Then came Michigan physician Jack Kevorkian, his suicide machine, and the well-publicized death he abetted last year for an Alzheimer's patient. And then came Marjorie Wantz and Sherry Miller, two women with painful but non-terminal diseases who last week took their own lives in his presence.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | April 12, 1996
BOSTON -- If you are looking for a medical term to describe their condition, you might call them the ''worried well.'' Since recent court decisions lifted the ban on doctor-assisted suicide in 12 states, both those who favor and those who oppose these rulings are worrying about what happens next.It's only 20 years since Karen Ann Quinlan's case came to court attached to a life-support machine. It's only six years since the Supreme Court finally ruled that there was a right to die, or more properly, a right to refuse life-prolonging treatment.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | February 28, 2009
Two Baltimore men indicted in a Georgia assisted-suicide investigation waived their right to an extradition hearing yesterday morning, hoping to accelerate their release from custody as they await trial. Attorneys for Dr. Lawrence D. Egbert, 81, and Nicholas Alec Sheridan, 60, who were arrested Wednesday in an eight-state probe of the Marietta, Ga.-based Final Exit Network, asked that the men be allowed to transport themselves to Georgia, where authorities say they plan to allow the men to be released on $60,000 bond.
SPORTS
By CHARLES BRICKER and CHARLES BRICKER,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | July 4, 2006
WIMBLEDON, England -- Shenay Perry yesterday had to deal with the nervousness of being on a show court, playing No. 7 seed Elena Dementieva with a throbbing knee and knowing she was the last American left in either Wimbledon draw. "Yesterday, I didn't really pay attention," she said of her unsought celebrity status as the final U.S. player standing at Wimbledon. And then, she added: "I think it got to me a little bit. I didn't handle it as well as I would have liked." It was the first time the United States was shut out of the Wimbledon singles quarterfinals in nearly a century.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1997
A leader of the right-to-die movement said in Baltimore last night that the medical establishment should help people die if they are near death and ask for assistance.But an expert in medical ethics countered that argument and said such practices could lead to abuses, especially in a climate of high health care costs.Those were the polar views of Derek Humphry, author of "Final Exit," the best-selling book about assisted suicide for the dying, and founder of the Hemlock Society, and Dr. Arthur Caplan, professor of bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | April 12, 1996
BOSTON -- If you are looking for a medical term to describe their condition, you might call them the ''worried well.'' Since recent court decisions lifted the ban on doctor-assisted suicide in 12 states, both those who favor and those who oppose these rulings are worrying about what happens next.It's only 20 years since Karen Ann Quinlan's case came to court attached to a life-support machine. It's only six years since the Supreme Court finally ruled that there was a right to die, or more properly, a right to refuse life-prolonging treatment.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 7, 1993
A popular suicide manual has had a noticeable effect on the methods people use to kill themselves, research has shown.The book, "Final Exit," recommends that terminally ill people wishing to end their lives rely on asphyxiation, which the book calls "self-deliverance via the plastic bag," combined with drugs for sedation.In the year after the book's publication in March 1991, the number of suicides by asphyxiation rose to 33 in New York City, a new study has shown, compared with eight in the year before the manual came out.The study will appear in the New England Journal of Medicine.
NEWS
By Mary Knudson | June 21, 1992
*TC The Johns Hopkins neurologist was nearing the end of a busy, routine day at the hospital. He had finished seeing patients and was phoning in his last prescription, a refill for an anti-seizure medication. But the most important medical decision would make that day, one he had sweated over for weeks, weighed heavily on his mind. And now was the moment of decision.He lifted the receiver and dialed 503-342-5748, the Oregon-based national headquarters of the Hemlock Society, a group that promotes the right of a terminally ill person to choose how and when he will end his own life.
NEWS
By Beverly K. Fine | November 26, 1991
THE FLAME from the memorial candle flickered, casting animated shadows on the wall. Alone in her apartment, Dora watched the dwindling light until it sputtered and faded away.Since her husband's death three years ago, Dora remained in the apartment she and Frank had shared for 40 years. Advanced age, along with physical frailty, heightened her grief. Childless, she became a recluse. Most telephone calls on her answering machine were neither answered nor returned.Visits from friends were discouraged.
NEWS
June 8, 2010
As the research analyst for a national disability rights group that opposes legalization of euthanasia and assisted suicide, I am all too familiar with the Final Exit Network (FEN). I think it's important that readers – and the editors – know that Jerry Dincin misled readers on several points in his essay published on June 7 ("Death with dignity"). Mr. Dincin claims that authorities are "persecuting" FEN members in Georgia and Arizona. That is a gross distortion. The authorities in Georgia and Arizona initiated investigations after complaints by concerned relatives that the apparent suicides of their loved ones were aided and encouraged by FEN members.
FEATURES
By Elise T. Chisolm | December 3, 1991
SHE'S DYING of cancer, and she wanted to talk to me about the best seller ''Final Exit'' by Derek Humphrey. Oddly enough, I had just finished reading the book.The book deals with the practicalities of assisted suicide and self-deliverance for the dying.My friend has about six months, the cancer has spread throughout her body. She is 78.Many of my friends have had cancer, most of them have not died. But this friend is in constant pain and she wants to have control of her ''final exit.'' She has written a living will and has made sure she will not be kept alive by artificial means.
NEWS
By Beverly K. Fine | November 26, 1991
THE FLAME from the memorial candle flickered, casting animated shadows on the wall. Alone in her apartment, Dora watched the dwindling light until it sputtered and faded away.Since her husband's death three years ago, Dora remained in the apartment she and Frank had shared for 40 years. Advanced age, along with physical frailty, heightened her grief. Childless, she became a recluse. Most telephone calls on her answering machine were neither answered nor returned.Visits from friends were discouraged.
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