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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2012
It's National Grammar Day, huzzah! You Don't Say brings you the fourth and final installment of Grammarnoir 4: Final Edition. " The previous installments: Part 1: "A Belle in the Night" Part 2: "The Mission" Part 3: "The Belly of the Beast" And now, the thrilling conclusion:   Part 4: The Chief I knew what to expect: a little man at...
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2013
The first installment of Grammarnoir 5: The Shame of the Prose will be posted on Monday, February 11. The remaining installments will be posted on successive Mondays, with the final installment appearing on March 4, National Grammar Day. Grammarnoir 1 , Grammarnoir 2: Pulp Diction , and Grammarnoir 3: The Wages of Syntax are available as podcasts. These are the links for Grammarnoir 4: Final Edition : "A Belle in the Night," "The Mission," "The Belly of the Beast," and "The Chief.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | September 15, 1995
The Evening Sun publishes its final editions today, a victim of changing times and failing circulation.During its 85-year lifetime, the Baltimore paper gained a national reputation for the social and political commentary of its most famous alumnus, H. L. Mencken. It won a pair of Pulitzer Prizes and helped launch the careers of many talented journalists, including biographer and author William Manchester, and broadcasters Jim McKay and Louis R. Rukeyser.Lively and irreverent in its heyday, The Evening Sun was created by the morning Sun in 1910 to challenge Baltimore's two afternoon papers, the News and the Star.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2012
Steve Buttry meditated yesterday on recapturing the joy and excitement of journalism , offering some valuable suggestions. I have another. Relish the work.  I mean the real work, not the attend-multiple-meetings, pretend-crap-is-better-than-it-is routines that eat into the day, and I have fresh examples.  Last night, as we were closing the final edition of the paper, word started leaking out that an arrest had been made in the killing of Phylicia Barnes, a teenager from North Carolina who disappeared and whose body was subsequently found in the Susquehanna River, a story we had been following for months.  Kim Walker, on the metro desk, was taking information from Justin Fenton, our crack police reporter.
NEWS
January 30, 1994
BEGINNING TUESDAY, the final editions of The Sun and Th Evening Sun will get a new look, signaling the latest-breaking news and sports.The Sun's final edition will contain news happening as late as 2 a.m. In The Evening Sun, with a final edition deadline past noon, you'll get that day's breaking news.Look for the bolder headlines and distinctive red final edition markers, available only at your newsstand or in sidewalk boxes.
NEWS
January 18, 1994
In the final edition of yesterday's Evening Sun, Adrienne Walker-Pittman's name was misspelled. She is a spokeswoman for the Baltimore-Washington International Airport.The Baltimore Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2013
The first installment of Grammarnoir 5: The Shame of the Prose will be posted on Monday, February 11. The remaining installments will be posted on successive Mondays, with the final installment appearing on March 4, National Grammar Day. Grammarnoir 1 , Grammarnoir 2: Pulp Diction , and Grammarnoir 3: The Wages of Syntax are available as podcasts. These are the links for Grammarnoir 4: Final Edition : "A Belle in the Night," "The Mission," "The Belly of the Beast," and "The Chief.
NEWS
January 17, 2012
I'm pleased to tell you that work has begun on “Grammarnoir 4: Final Edition.” As previously, it will appear on this blog in a series of weekly installments, beginning in February and concluding on March 4, National Grammar Day. Today, for you, a little taste, a paragraph from Part 1, “A belle in the night”: “This is quite satisfactory,” she said, adjusting her skirt to allow me to admire the line of her thigh. Her vocabulary was Downton Abbey , but her accent was Keeping Up With the Kardashians . Her clothes said Saks, but her eyes said floozy.
BUSINESS
By Alec Matthew Klein and Alec Matthew Klein,Sun Staff Writer | September 9, 1995
Cal Ripken can sell newspapers, too.Moments after the Iron Man of baseball broke the record for most consecutive games played, volunteer hawkers Wednesday night at Oriole Park at Camden Yards sold 38,000 commemorative editions of The Sun in 2 1/2 hours.An additional 33,000 papers were sold across the city that night. It was the first time The Sun has printed an extra edition since the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962.Overall, The Sun sold about 387,000 additional copies of Wednesday's and Thursday's papers -- the most in recent memory and more than the estimated 340,000 combined daily circulation of The Sun and The Evening Sun.One thousand copies of Wednesday's edition also were dispatched to Aberdeen, Mr. Ripken's hometown.
NEWS
John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2012
I still go over to the old place once a day to check the locks, turn a couple of lights on in the evening, clean out the spam from the comments. Come warm weather, I guess I'll have to cut the grass there every few weeks. It's kind of eerie, you know, the place still completely furnished with all those posts but silent now, and abandoned. It's been less than a week, but nobody goes there any more. Nobody, including me, has gotten quite used to the new digs, either.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2012
It's National Grammar Day, huzzah! You Don't Say brings you the fourth and final installment of Grammarnoir 4: Final Edition. " The previous installments: Part 1: "A Belle in the Night" Part 2: "The Mission" Part 3: "The Belly of the Beast" And now, the thrilling conclusion:   Part 4: The Chief I knew what to expect: a little man at...
NEWS
John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2012
I still go over to the old place once a day to check the locks, turn a couple of lights on in the evening, clean out the spam from the comments. Come warm weather, I guess I'll have to cut the grass there every few weeks. It's kind of eerie, you know, the place still completely furnished with all those posts but silent now, and abandoned. It's been less than a week, but nobody goes there any more. Nobody, including me, has gotten quite used to the new digs, either.
NEWS
January 17, 2012
I'm pleased to tell you that work has begun on “Grammarnoir 4: Final Edition.” As previously, it will appear on this blog in a series of weekly installments, beginning in February and concluding on March 4, National Grammar Day. Today, for you, a little taste, a paragraph from Part 1, “A belle in the night”: “This is quite satisfactory,” she said, adjusting her skirt to allow me to admire the line of her thigh. Her vocabulary was Downton Abbey , but her accent was Keeping Up With the Kardashians . Her clothes said Saks, but her eyes said floozy.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn | December 7, 2011
For the first time in 38 years of the state football tournament, three Baltimore-area teams won championships over the weekend. No. 3 Old Mill took the Class 4A title in certainly one of the best games state tournament history, 36-35 in overtime, over Quince Orchard. No. 5 River Hill won the 3A crown, 41-13, over Thomas Johnson. Dunbar took its second straight Class 1A title, 32-11, over Perryville. Here's a numerical look at the state championships with thanks to Sheldon Shealer, who compiles state records for the MPSSAA.  2 State championships in the last three years for Old Mill 3 State championships in the last five years for River Hill 4 Most consecutive state titles - Urbana from 1998-2001 6 Of Dunbar's eight state titles won in the last eight years 9 Turnovers by Thomas Johnson against River Hill's relentless defense 10 Straight games won by River Hill to finish the season 12 Most state championships - Seneca Valley, which won its last title in 2002 13 Combined state titles won by Old Mill, River Hill and Dunbar 14 Straight wins for Old Mill, the area's longest active winning streak 34 Unanswered points scored by River Hill against Thomas Johnson 40 Playoff wins in Dunbar history, closing in on Seneca Valley's record 41 49 Touchdowns scored this...
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2002
Carole Pickett is full of stories. In her line of work, she has to be. As publisher of The Business Monthly, a newspaper she almost single-handedly built, she has been known across the area as the photographer at awards ceremonies, the board member at numerous business and charity meetings and the saleswoman on the phone. In her world, which spans Columbia, Ellicott City, Laurel and the BWI business district, Pickett is everything to everyone except what she wants to be: retired. At age 59 - she'll be 60 next month - she's trying hard to get out of the business.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2002
Carole Pickett is full of stories. In her line of work, she has to be. As publisher of The Business Monthly, a newspaper she almost single-handedly built, she has been known around town as the photographer at awards ceremonies, the board member at numerous business and charity meetings and the saleswoman on the phone. In her world, which spans Columbia, Ellicott City, Laurel and the BWI business district, Pickett is everything to everyone except what she wants to be: retired. At age 59 - she'll be 60 next month - she's trying hard to get out of the business.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | January 31, 2002
Kweisi Mfume returned to Television Hill last night to tape one last edition of The Bottom Line, the WBAL-TV public affairs show that he has headlined for nine years. Executives with WBAL's corporate owner, Hearst-Argyle, were joined by talk-show host Iyanla Vanzant and others last night to toast Mfume. Over the years, his topics have ranged from presidential politics to televised wrestling, and attracted political figures, actors, comics and activists. The show's cancellation resulted from its seeming promise.
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