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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 10, 2006
Who knew Death was a Rube Goldberg fan? Final Destination 3 continues the movie franchise in which some teenager and a group of his or her friends somehow cheat death, only to discover soon thereafter that the Grim Reaper doesn't like taking no for an answer. In the first film, a bunch of teens stepped off a doomed airplane at the last moment before takeoff. In the second, a teenage girl blocked access to an interstate highway, preventing a group of drivers from being obliterated in a massive traffic accident.
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By Phil Rogers | November 22, 2009
Scott Boras says November is a "greeting card month" for free agents. Teams send out feelers, check medical records and weigh their options. They might discuss parameters of a deal, but only rarely do they start sincere negotiations before Thanksgiving. CC Sabathia signed with the Yankees on Dec. 11 last year. Mark Teixeira didn't get his deal done until almost two weeks later. Signing season officially opened Friday, but agents and club executives are expecting this year's top free agents to sign again at a leisurely pace.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 31, 2003
Final Destination 2 is definitely nasty. Ostensibly a supernatural /horror thriller about how cheating death is not a life choice to be taken lightly, what it really is is a doctoral thesis on how many grisly, inventive ways people can die supposedly accidental deaths in a movie. The answer is plenty, the inventive factor considerable, the grisly quotient off the charts. It ain't art. But as a cinematic house of horrors, it more than fills the bill. In the original Final Destination, we met a bunch of high school students who were supposed to be on a plane to Europe, but were instead yanked off at the last minute thanks to a ruckus caused by one of them having premonitions of doom.
NEWS
By GARRISON KEILLOR | July 13, 2006
A summer night in paradise, supper in the back yard, and the neighbors' elderly cat, who is on his last legs, wanders over, smelling the salmon on our grill, walking as if his feet hurt. He's got the old cat blues. He wakes up in the morning and everything tastes like turpentine; he feels like going down to the railroad line and letting the 4:19 pacify his troubled mind. My wife serves him a piece of salmon and he eats slowly, savoring the fish oil. He is 15 years old, and this likely will be his last summer, and a fine one it is. In Minnesota, we look forward to these warm summer nights.
NEWS
December 7, 2004
A malfunction in an auxiliary power unit on the tail of an arriving Southwest Airlines passenger jet was blamed for a brief scare at Baltimore-Washington International Airport last night. Jonathan Dean, a spokesman for the Maryland Aviation Administration, said the flight from Indianapolis was taxiing to the gate when the problem occurred about 6:15 p.m. Fire and rescue crews answering the call found no fire, he said. Southwest spokeswoman Edna Ruano said the crew of the Boeing 737 was alerted that an air-traffic controller had spotted an external fire.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 17, 2006
The sun never comes out for Tamara (Jenna Dewan), a gifted but woebegone student of literature and witchcraft. Her high school's generic-brand jocks and jockettes, angered by her school-newspaper expose of steroid use, humiliate and accidentally kill her. The good news is she rises again, all buff and sassy, sporting a wardrobe so tight it appears to be fastened subcutaneously. (It includes a Madonna-middle-era bustier and a little red dress.) The bad news is she's now evil. Nothing can halt her homicidal mischief until she wins the object of her desire: the high school English teacher (Matthew Marsden)
NEWS
April 15, 1992
James Ellis Henson, the county's new human rights administrator, likes to talk about his ancestors -- great uncle Matthew Alexander Henson, co-discoverer of the North Pole with Robert E. Peary, and the Rev.Josiah Henson, a runaway slave portrayed in "Uncle Tom's Cabin."If they were alive today, his ancestors might be talking about him. An ardent student of black history, Henson does everything with flair.It is not surprising that when he began thinking about a way to honor his great uncle on the 83rd anniversary of the discovery of the North Pole -- April 6, 1909 -- Henson decided to follow in his footsteps.
NEWS
By GARRISON KEILLOR | July 13, 2006
A summer night in paradise, supper in the back yard, and the neighbors' elderly cat, who is on his last legs, wanders over, smelling the salmon on our grill, walking as if his feet hurt. He's got the old cat blues. He wakes up in the morning and everything tastes like turpentine; he feels like going down to the railroad line and letting the 4:19 pacify his troubled mind. My wife serves him a piece of salmon and he eats slowly, savoring the fish oil. He is 15 years old, and this likely will be his last summer, and a fine one it is. In Minnesota, we look forward to these warm summer nights.
NEWS
By Thom Loverro and Thom Loverro,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 18, 1990
CLEAR SPRING -- A familiar fear came over Arthur James and his fellow veterans after they got off the plane in Bangkok in September and saw a Thai soldier holding an M-16 rifle.The tension heightened for the seven Americans when they boarded another plane for a 90-minute trip to their final destination -- Hanoi. The blur of war from 20 years before grew more vivid for Mr. James during the flight. The last time he'd been in Vietnam, his legs were almost blown off.But instead of the enemy waiting at the end of their journey, Mr. James and the others met victims of the U.S. attacks during the 12-day Christmas bombing of North Vietnam in 1972.
NEWS
By Mary Gold and Mary Gold,Contributing Writer | December 30, 1990
When our first family trip to Florida -- and the inevitable Disney World -- loomed on the schedule last October, I was determined to find something of personal interest that I could enjoy. I love vacationing with my family, but amusement parks and long lines are not my favorite things.I discovered that Florida has much to offer the Howard County gardener, not only in terms of landscape beauty, but in colorful lessons to be applied here at home.For a gardener, the native flora of a tropical climate like Florida is worth a trip to experience just by itself.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 17, 2006
The sun never comes out for Tamara (Jenna Dewan), a gifted but woebegone student of literature and witchcraft. Her high school's generic-brand jocks and jockettes, angered by her school-newspaper expose of steroid use, humiliate and accidentally kill her. The good news is she rises again, all buff and sassy, sporting a wardrobe so tight it appears to be fastened subcutaneously. (It includes a Madonna-middle-era bustier and a little red dress.) The bad news is she's now evil. Nothing can halt her homicidal mischief until she wins the object of her desire: the high school English teacher (Matthew Marsden)
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 10, 2006
Who knew Death was a Rube Goldberg fan? Final Destination 3 continues the movie franchise in which some teenager and a group of his or her friends somehow cheat death, only to discover soon thereafter that the Grim Reaper doesn't like taking no for an answer. In the first film, a bunch of teens stepped off a doomed airplane at the last moment before takeoff. In the second, a teenage girl blocked access to an interstate highway, preventing a group of drivers from being obliterated in a massive traffic accident.
NEWS
December 7, 2004
A malfunction in an auxiliary power unit on the tail of an arriving Southwest Airlines passenger jet was blamed for a brief scare at Baltimore-Washington International Airport last night. Jonathan Dean, a spokesman for the Maryland Aviation Administration, said the flight from Indianapolis was taxiing to the gate when the problem occurred about 6:15 p.m. Fire and rescue crews answering the call found no fire, he said. Southwest spokeswoman Edna Ruano said the crew of the Boeing 737 was alerted that an air-traffic controller had spotted an external fire.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 31, 2003
Final Destination 2 is definitely nasty. Ostensibly a supernatural /horror thriller about how cheating death is not a life choice to be taken lightly, what it really is is a doctoral thesis on how many grisly, inventive ways people can die supposedly accidental deaths in a movie. The answer is plenty, the inventive factor considerable, the grisly quotient off the charts. It ain't art. But as a cinematic house of horrors, it more than fills the bill. In the original Final Destination, we met a bunch of high school students who were supposed to be on a plane to Europe, but were instead yanked off at the last minute thanks to a ruckus caused by one of them having premonitions of doom.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2001
WASHINGTON - The motivation for the Georgetown University basketball team hangs on a wall in the bathroom of a locker room at McDonough Gym. Over the urinals. The placement of last season's National Invitation Tournament banner is as strategic as the message that this season's Hoyas take from the memento. It's a reminder of where Georgetown doesn't want to be come March, the tournament in which the Hoyas have played in each of the past three years. "I want to take it down now," junior point guard Kevin Braswell said last week.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN STAFF | November 24, 1998
Tomorrow night on TNT, "Babylon 5," the science-fiction fan's science-fiction series, ends the five-year odyssey its creator had always promised -- but only after an escape that would do even the most experienced starship commander proud.For last summer, it looked as though "Babylon 5" would follow the path established by "Star Trek," although not in the way its fans would have preferred.Just as "Star Trek" had promised, in that famous introductory voice-over from William Shatner, to take viewers on a five-year mission, "Babylon 5" creator J. Michael Straczynski had always envisioned a five-year plan for his intergalactic space station.
SPORTS
By Phil Rogers | November 22, 2009
Scott Boras says November is a "greeting card month" for free agents. Teams send out feelers, check medical records and weigh their options. They might discuss parameters of a deal, but only rarely do they start sincere negotiations before Thanksgiving. CC Sabathia signed with the Yankees on Dec. 11 last year. Mark Teixeira didn't get his deal done until almost two weeks later. Signing season officially opened Friday, but agents and club executives are expecting this year's top free agents to sign again at a leisurely pace.
SPORTS
By Rick Belz and Rick Belz,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1995
They've taken decidedly different roads, but both Centennial and Wilde Lake have ended up at the same destination -- the state boys soccer championships at Old Mill High School.Top-ranked Centennial (16-0) puts its 30-game win streak on the line in the Class 3A championship game tomorrow at 5 p.m. against Bel Air (11-4-1), a team it defeated earlier this season, 2-0.The Eagles shoot for their seventh state title and fourth in the last five years. Bel Air has never won a state title.Six-time state champion Wilde Lake (8-5-3)
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | March 7, 1997
That puzzling highway ramp that juts out from Interstate 95 south of town and abruptly ends in midair finally has a new destination: The scrap heap.The decades-old unconnected ramp between the Washington Boulevard and Caton Avenue exits is being demolished by the Maryland Transportation Authority beginning this week. The job should be done in four months.The ramp stood as a brash commitment by city leaders to plow through West Baltimore's neighborhoods to connect I-95 to Interstate 70. But the Southwest Highway, as it was called, was beaten back by community leaders who believed the road would obliterate their rowhouses as well as nearby Leakin Park.
SPORTS
By Rick Belz and Rick Belz,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1995
They've taken decidedly different roads, but both Centennial and Wilde Lake have ended up at the same destination -- the state boys soccer championships at Old Mill High School.Top-ranked Centennial (16-0) puts its 30-game win streak on the line in the Class 3A championship game tomorrow at 5 p.m. against Bel Air (11-4-1), a team it defeated earlier this season, 2-0.The Eagles shoot for their seventh state title and fourth in the last five years. Bel Air has never won a state title.Six-time state champion Wilde Lake (8-5-3)
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