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Final Concert

NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 19, 1999
About six weeks after 22 of its members returned from a singing tour of the Czech Republic, Columbia Pro Cantare, Howard County's premier choral organization, has announced details of its 1999-2000 concert season.Under the baton of conductor Frances Motyca Dawson, Pro Cantare will begin its 23rd season Oct. 30 at the Jim Rouse Theatre of the Performing Arts at Wilde Lake in Columbia with a performance of Giuseppe Verdi's monumental "Requiem Mass."Dedicated to the memory of Italian novelist and nationalist Alessandro Manzoni, the Verdi requiem is a dramatic musical treatment of the Roman liturgy for the dead.
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FEATURES
December 24, 2009
THE CHRISTMAS STORY: The Walters Art Museum, 600 N. Charles St., might be closed Christmas Eve and Christmas Day, but there's still plenty of time to reflect on the meaning of the holiday. "The Christmas Story: Picturing the Birth of Christ in Medieval Manuscripts" includes medieval illustrations based on the events of the Christmas story as recounted in the New Testament. This exhibit runs through Feb. 28. Admission is free. Call 410-547-9000 or go to thewalters.org. DANIELIA COTTON: This rock-and-roller influenced by the likes of Tina Turner, AC/DC and Joe Cocker comes to Rams Head on Stage, 33 West St. in Annapolis, at 8 p.m. Kat Parsons also performs.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 27, 2004
In the Bravo Bernstein! concert Saturday at St. John's Key Auditorium, Glenette Schumacher capped the Arundel Vocal Arts Society's 21st season and her 10th year as music and artistic director. The performance, which honored one of her favorite composers, also marked Schumacher's final concert before taking a year's sabbatical to pursue graduate studies. The all-Leonard Bernstein program included selections from his Mass, 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, Peter Pan, Candide, West Side Story and Chichester Psalms.
NEWS
November 17, 1994
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's return tomorrow from its triumphal month-long tour of East Asia marks the beginning of a new era. The Asian tour, capped by last week's stunning performances in Tokyo's Suntory Hall, the Japanese equivalent of Carnegie Hall, established the BSO as a world-class ensemble in the world's biggest market for classical music."
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 19, 1999
Some six weeks after 22 of its members returned from a singing tour of the Czech Republic, Columbia Pro Cantare, Howard County's premier choral organization, has announced details of its 1999-2000 concert season.Under the baton of conductor Frances Motyca Dawson, Pro Cantare will begin its 23rd season Oct. 30 at the Jim Rouse Theatre of the Performing Arts at Wilde Lake in Columbia with a performance of Giuseppe Verdi's monumental "Requiem Mass."Dedicated to the memory of Italian novelist and nationalist Alessandro Manzoni, the Verdi requiem is a dramatic musical treatment of the Roman liturgy for the dead.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | February 8, 1991
THE ANNAPOLIS Symphony Orchestra this weekend plays under the baton of Gisele Ben-Dor, resident conductor of the Houston Symphony, the third of six candidates trying out for full-time conductor this year before a selection is made in May.Pat Edwards, executive director of the 80-member orchestra, said the new permanent leader will replace Peter Bay, who left last year to become associate conductor of the Rochester Philharmonic and assistant conductor of...
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | July 8, 1991
How much people love the flutist James Galway can be gauged by how willing they are to get wet for him.Last night during the superstar flutist's appearance with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra at Merriweather Post Pavilion in the final concert of the Columbia Festival of the Arts, it rained. It one was the sort of deluge that can sometimes make one think that Maryland is the subtropics. But most of the people sitting on the lawn did not leave, preferring to get drenched in order to hear Galway play Mozart with the BSO and its music director, David Zinman.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Evening Sun Staff | March 14, 1991
It has been a year of milestones and transitions for member of the Baltimore Consort. For one, they are celebrating 10 years as an ensemble, an unusually long life span for a group that focuses on British, French and Italian music of the 16th and 17th centuries.The group has also released its first compact disc, "On the Banks of Helicon: Early Music of Scotland," on the Dorian label.And, after seven years as ensemble-in-residence at the Walters Art Gallery, the Consort has become the Peabody Conservatory's resident ensemble.
FEATURES
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2005
Not with a headbang, but with a whimper, the popular heavy metal nightclub Thunder Dome will close its doors at the end of this month. The South Hanover Street venue was sold to Vu Tan Huynh, 34, of Rockville, who plans to reopen the venue as Club Mate, according to documents filed with the Board of Liquor License Commissioners for Baltimore City. The documents do not describe the type of club it would become. Thunder Dome opened in September 2001 and brought in national heavy metal acts including Vince Neil from Motley Crue, Bret Michaels, a former member of Poison, and Kings X. The final concert - a 14-band blowout, though not featuring any national names - will be Feb. 27. "I'll miss having that intimate club feel where you could see the people you worshiped," said Michael Fey, Thunder Dome's floor manager.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 3, 2005
Robert Moody, introduced as the last of the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra's guest conductors for the season, faced a rather daunting challenge after the intermission of a concert last weekend. Shortly after starting the third movement - the adagio - of Rachmaninoff's Symphony No. 2 in E Minor, the lights went out in Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts, leaving the audience and musicians in darkness for seven minutes. Maestro Moody more than coped. He joked with the audience about the lights being dimmed to enhance the piece's romantic mood.
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