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Final Approval

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By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2014
Two domestic violence bills on Gov. Martin O'Malley's wish list won final passage in the General Assembly Monday night, pushing his agenda closer to completion. One of the measures would ease the burden of proof for domestic violence victims asking a judge to issue a protective court order against an alleged abuser. Maryland is now the only state to require "clear and convincing" proof of abuse. The bill would change that to the "preponderance of the evidence" standard used in other states.
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NEWS
By Baltimore Sun staff | April 5, 2014
Here are some of the things expected to happen as the General Assembly goes into one of the body's busiest days of the session. TOP NEWS: • Marijuana : The House will debate marijuana decriminalization, and it's likely that lawmakers could have a deal by the end of the day. This morning, the House Judiciary Committee approved amendments to the marijuana bill that restored decriminalization.  PRELIMINARY APPROVALS IN THE HOUSE: ...
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NEWS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2012
Olney-based Sandy Spring Bancorp said Wednesday that it had received final regulatory approvals of its acquisition of CommerceFirst Bancorp in Annapolis. The stock-and-cash deal — which is valued at $25.4 million and still requires the approval of CommerceFirst shareholders — is expected to close in the second quarter. For Sandy Spring, the acquisition adds CommerceFirst's $205 million in total assets, $181 million in gross loans and $180 million in total deposits. It also expands Sandy Spring's footprint in Anne Arundel, Howard and Prince George's counties, where CommerceFirst Bank operates five branches.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley's chief legislative priority to raise the minimum wage cleared another hurdle Friday as the Senate granted initial approval after a marathon debate. Lawmakers made 18 different attempts to redraft the proposal that incrementally raises pay for the state's lowest-earning workers from $7.25 to $10.10 by 2018. Republicans tried to carve out more exemptions to the hike, while Democrats tried to undo some concessions that got the proposal this far. No attempts were successful, and the Senate could pass the measure as soon as Saturday.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | January 30, 1991
The developers of the Oakmont golf course to be built here this yearhave some conditions to meet before the Planning and Zoning Commission's final approval takes effect.One condition depends on an awaited report from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers about how the course would affect wetlands.Another variable is a possible modification of the planned Hampstead bypass to Route 30, which could affect the location of the entrance road.The golf course will be public, although some of the maximum 100 memberships will be reserved for residents of the 89-home luxury development planned next to the course, said Leland Snyder of Oakmont Green, the corporation planning on purchasing, building and managing the course.
SPORTS
By Rick Belz and Rick Belz,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2003
The Howard County Board of Education last night gave initial approval for lighting all of the county high school stadium fields with a 5-0 vote. For the past 40 years, only Howard High has had a lighted stadium. Three previous plans to construct lights at the others schools were rejected. The earliest the lights would go up for the 10 affected high schools would be September, said the county's coordinator of athletics, Don Disney. Lighting every high school is expected to cost $800,000, with the full amount expected to be paid through donations.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2001
After nearly two months of often-tense debate and reluctant concessions, the Baltimore City Council gave final approval yesterday to Mayor Martin O'Malley's $1.7 billion budget. In approving the budget, the council ratified the mayor's heavy investment in the Police Department, his choice of higher taxes over deep budget cuts and his decision to privatize some city jobs by contracting for custodial and security services. "I'm glad it's over," O'Malley said. "Somebody asked this week if I enjoyed this job, and I said, `Not much, lately.
NEWS
December 13, 1996
An article in yesterday's editions incorrectly reported that Baltimore's Department of Housing and Community Development approved plans for a commercial blood collection center in Highlandtown. The agency has not given final approval.The Sun regrets the errors.
NEWS
December 28, 2004
A headline accompanying a front-page article in Oct. 20 editions of The Sun, "Ehrlich OK'd deal for land," may have left readers with the impression that Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. had given final approval to a plan for sale of public lands. The article reported on testimony by Maryland Department of General Services Secretary Boyd K. Rutherford, in which Rutherford said Ehrlich was briefed in 2003 and "said it was worth pursuing." Only the Board of Public Works, on which the governor serves, can authorize final approval of any public land sale.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley can check off another win as the General Assembly gave final approval to his bill seeking to control the growth of large developments on septic systems. The Senate agreed with the House amendments and voted for the bill 32-15.  
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2014
Two domestic violence bills on Gov. Martin O'Malley's wish list won final passage in the General Assembly Monday night, pushing his agenda closer to completion. One of the measures would ease the burden of proof for domestic violence victims asking a judge to issue a protective court order against an alleged abuser. Maryland is now the only state to require "clear and convincing" proof of abuse. The bill would change that to the "preponderance of the evidence" standard used in other states.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
Amid continued protests, the Baltimore City Council is set to give final approval Monday to more than $100 million in taxpayer assistance for the massive Harbor Point development that the mayor calls a "once-in-a-generation opportunity. " Council members say they expect the $107 million in tax-increment-financing bonds for the waterfront project to pass easily despite a late effort by community groups, activists and unions to amend the legislation. Critics question both the size of the aid package and the amenities on which the money will be spent.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2013
Two key budgetary measures are headed to Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's desk after the City Council gave final approval Monday to new storm water fees and a pension overhaul. The new storm water fees will cost homeowners between $40 and $120 a year. The rate depends on the amount of impervious surfaces that allow rainwater to wash pollution into Chesapeake Bay tributaries. The council signed off on the fees — included in the city's $2.4 billion operating budget — without discussion.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2013
The Maryland Senate gave final approval to Gov. Martin O'Malley's sweeping gun control bill Thursday night, sending the legislation to the governor for his promised signature. O'Malley said in a statement that the bill strikes "a balance between protecting the safety of law enforcement and our children, and respecting the traditions of hunters and law-abiding citizens to purchase handguns for self-protection. " The legislation bans the sale of assault-style weapons, requires fingerprints and a license to buy a handgun, and limits magazines to 10 bullets, among other provisions, giving Maryland one of the strictest gun laws in the nation.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2013
The City Council gave final approval Monday to a bill that would allow companies such as Ticketmaster to continue to charge unlimited fees when selling tickets to events in Baltimore. The 15-member council voted without discussion in favor of the bill, which exempts Ticketmaster and other ticket sellers from Baltimore's long-standing anti-scalping law. Only council members Bill Henry, James B. Kraft and Mary Pat Clarke voted "no. " The law will sunset in September. By then, council members say, they will have had enough time to draft permanent legislation.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2013
Energy giant Exelon Corp.'s regional headquarters in Harbor Point would rise 23 stories and 350 feet, reshaping Baltimore's skyline with a futuristic glass tower, under a preliminary design approved Thursday by a city advisory panel. Approval of the "schematic" phase of building design moves the project closer to its planned spring construction start, developer Michael S. Beatty said. Beatty, president of the newly formed Harbor Point Development Group LLC, was asked to return to the Urban Design and Architectural Review Panel with revisions for final approval.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | March 1, 1994
Developer Michael Berman won final approval last night from the Mount Airy Planning and Zoning Commission on his site plan for the first phase of the town's first senior housing development.The panel gave conditional approval in December to the plan, which calls for 11 housing units to be built at Ridge and Park avenues.Mr. Berman has proposed 32 units for people over age 62 on 4 acres of the 10-acre site. The community is slated to be a combination of duplexes and detached houses, with prices starting at $80,000.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | April 3, 2001
House approves office overseeing growth policies The House of Delegates gave final approval yesterday to a bill establishing an Office of Smart Growth, designed to help the public, local governments and developers understand the rules and regulations of state policies. Gov. Parris N. Glendening made legislative approval of the office one of his goal's for this year's General Assembly session. Setting up and operating the office will cost about $400,000 a year. The House passed the Senate's version of bill by a vote of 109-21.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley can check off another win as the General Assembly gave final approval to his bill seeking to control the growth of large developments on septic systems. The Senate agreed with the House amendments and voted for the bill 32-15.  
NEWS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2012
Olney-based Sandy Spring Bancorp said Wednesday that it had received final regulatory approvals of its acquisition of CommerceFirst Bancorp in Annapolis. The stock-and-cash deal — which is valued at $25.4 million and still requires the approval of CommerceFirst shareholders — is expected to close in the second quarter. For Sandy Spring, the acquisition adds CommerceFirst's $205 million in total assets, $181 million in gross loans and $180 million in total deposits. It also expands Sandy Spring's footprint in Anne Arundel, Howard and Prince George's counties, where CommerceFirst Bank operates five branches.
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