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By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | July 7, 1997
A $500,000 surface-water filtering system is due to be installed soon at three Westminster wells to meet state and federal requirements, city officials said.The installation of two filters at three city wells is in the engineering stage.Construction is planned this year, about a year behind a state deadline, said Thomas B. Beyard, the city's director of planning and public works."We estimate that we'll finish in the fall of 1997," he said. "No government has been able to meet [the deadline]
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2012
A chlorine leak at Montebello Filtration Plant No. 2 on Hillen Road in Baltimore Monday morning sent two workers to the hospital, according to a city public works spokesman. The leak occurred around 9:30 a.m. Monday and two workers who were exposed to the chemical were taken to local hospitals, public works spokesman Kurt Kocher said. He could not comment on their condition. Approximately 15-to-20 people working in the plant at the time were evacuated, he said. Baltimore City firefighters and HAZMAT workers capped the leak, which Kocher said appeared to be caused by a faulty cap on one of the plant's out-of-service filtration cylinders.
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NEWS
February 20, 1997
An article in yesterday's Howard edition of The Sun incorrectly detailed steps taken by a neighbor of the Carrs Mill Landfill to improve her home's water system. The resident says she paid for a new water filtration system.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 2/20/97
NEWS
March 27, 2008
For the cash-strapped Maryland Zoo, finding money to repair decrepit buildings and an outdated water system and to pay for other overdue maintenance projects is an understandable struggle. What homeowner hasn't let a few repairs slide? But the "to do" list has to get done now - the zoo's national accreditation depends on it. Improvements at the Druid Hill campus also are critical to its viability and support from loyal patrons. The Maryland Zoo has until September to show significant progress on correcting deficiencies cited last fall by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums.
BUSINESS
December 2, 1996
BaltimoreDec. 2-4INDA Association of the Non-woven Fabrics Industry filtration conference and exhibit, Sheraton Inner Harbor, Charles and Conway streets. Contact: James Fricke. Expected attendance: 500.Dec. 4-8National Association of Independent Schools, Renaissance Harborplace. Contact: Randolf Carter. Expected attendance: 1,000.Pub Date: 12/02/96
NEWS
November 14, 1996
Charles David Evans, a manager at the Montebello Filtration Plant for 30 years, died Thursday of a heart attack at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 76.The lifelong Northwest Baltimore resident graduated from Douglass High School in 1938 and Keystone Radio School in Boston, and served in the Army during World War II.He worked at the Baltimore Department of Public Works Montebello Filtration Plant in northeast Baltimore from 1956 to 1986. He was one of the plant managers for the past 20 years.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 10, 2003
Harford County deputies were investigating a possible homicide last night after the nude body of an elderly woman was found in an Edgewood field. The body of the woman, believed to be in her 60s, was found in a field near the 1200 block of Hall St., just north of Winters Run Filtration Plant at Aberdeen Proving Ground, the county sheriff's office said. Detectives were in the field last night, searching for evidence.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,Evening Sun Staff | August 23, 1991
It's better not to touch the electric catfish at the Aquarium Center in Randallstown.The 8-inch, brown and bulbous creature packs a 600-volt jolt for predators, prey or the foolishly curious.Luckily, the freshwater native of the Congo River Basin of West Africa prefers a reclusive life these days, hiding in a section of white pipe at the bottom of its tank.But it's not alone. There are more than 100,000 fresh- and saltwater fish at the Aquarium Center at the Randallstown Plaza Shopping Center in Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | December 22, 2003
Using a new $750,000 federal grant, Baltimore County plans next month to begin installing filtration systems to reduce firefighters' exposure to diesel fuel emissions. Although County Executive James T. Smith Jr. had earmarked $2 million over the next two years for the project, the county will now have to cover $1.25 million to install the systems, which filter the exhaust fumes from diesel-powered firetrucks and engines. Twenty-three of the 25 county-owned fire stations are scheduled to receive the equipment, said Elise Armacost, a county Fire Department spokeswoman.
NEWS
February 2, 1999
John R. Masaschi, 51, owner of water filtration companyJohn R. Masaschi, owner of a company that distributes water filtration systems, died Saturday of cancer at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Lutherville resident was 51.He had been owner and president of Advanced Filtration and Separation Inc. in Timonium since 1991. Before then he was a salesman and president of a product marketing company.Born in Boston, he was a 1965 graduate of Dulaney High School and earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Baltimore in 1969.
NEWS
December 16, 2007
School board must watch water source Mary Gail Hare's excellent article, "Forest Hill school wants hookup to public water," highlights one of the risks of building outside the county's designated development envelope -- no public water. People building homes outside the development envelope accept the risks and personal responsibility for their decision. At Forest Hill Elementary School, MTBE was the school's problem to solve because the school, being outside the development envelope, must use a private well.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun reporter | November 25, 2007
Education officials, staff and parents at a northern Harford elementary school coping with contaminated wells are asking for a connection to nearby public water lines. Trace amounts of MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether), a gasoline additive, were detected in the two private wells at Forest Hill Elementary School in 2005. By the spring of last year, tests showed the levels had risen to 13.6 parts per billion, a level still considered safe by federal standards, but one that prompted the school to use bottled water.
NEWS
By MARY GAIL HARE and MARY GAIL HARE,SUN REPORTER | December 25, 2005
After years of planning, two Carroll County projects are under way. One will provide more water to the county's most populous area, and the other will offer youths long-term drug rehabilitation in a residential setting. The Carroll County Planning and Zoning Commission has reviewed the concept plans for the $22 million expansion of the Freedom Water Treatment Plant, which serves more than 7,000 homes and businesses in South Carroll, and for the $3 million drug treatment facility to be built on the grounds of Springfield Hospital Center in Sykesville.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | October 16, 2005
Over the last two years, scientists working on the Potomac River have netted 111 smallmouth bass with bizarre sexual traits. The fish were males but had eggs growing inside their testes. Researchers found many of these gender-bending bass downstream from sewage treatment plants in water tinged with a chemical called ethinylestradiol - the active ingredient in birth control pills. More studies are necessary, biologists say, but evidence is mounting that trace levels of prescription drugs in rivers and streams may be harming fish, tadpoles, frogs, mussels and oysters.
NEWS
October 9, 2005
SPOTTED: A PERFECT ACCENT LAMP This whimsical Leopard-Print Purse Accent Lamp has fuchsia feather trim, pink beading and a clear beaded handle. The 12-inch-high lamp takes a 40-watt type B bulb, and indeed lights up any room. Available at Target stores and target.com. RETAIL PRICE: $14.99 SPLURGE OF THE WEEK BATHING WITH THE FISHES Designed and manufactured in Italy by Italbrass, the Moody Aquarium Sink is both a fully functional sink and a self-contained, watertight aquarium for goldfish and sand, rocks and plants.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2005
State officials told a group of Hampstead area residents last night that they are still unsure how their wells became contaminated by a toxic gasoline additive. Herbert Meade, chief of oil control for the Maryland Department of the Environment, told about 40 people at the Hampstead Town Hall that officials have investigated four possible sources for the methyl tertiary butyl ether, or MTBE, in their wells. Investigators have checked a Shell Jiffy Mart service station in town and three residences, including one where they discovered a leaking underground gas tank.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 12, 2001
In the first significant security alert at Baltimore-Washington International Airport since the terrorist attacks Sept. 11, officials evacuated a concourse yesterday to check a "suspicious" item that turned out to be a hand-held water filtration system, officials said. Concourse D, which has gates for US Airways and Trans World Airlines, was closed at 6:14 a.m. and reopened at 7:40 a.m., officials said. The closure caused major backups. The passenger carrying the device in carry-on luggage was released after being questioned.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2004
Traces of gasoline contamination have been found in the water wells at four additional Harford County gasoline stations, the county's health officer told the County Council last night. The report by Dr. Andrew Bernstein brings to seven the number of gasoline stations identified in Harford as sites of possible contamination by methyl tertiary butyl ether, or MTBE as it is commonly called. The four stations include a Royal Farms store on Route 22 in Churchville that Bernstein said voluntarily stopped serving food, coffee and sodas from its fountains yesterday.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2004
Traces of gasoline contamination have been found in the water wells at four additional Harford County gasoline stations, the county's health officer told the County Council last night. The report by Dr. Andrew Bernstein brings to seven the number of gasoline stations identified in Harford as sites of possible contamination by methyl tertiary butyl ether, or MTBE as it is commonly called. The four stations include a Royal Farms store on Route 22 in Churchville that Bernstein said voluntarily stopped serving food, coffee and sodas from its fountains yesterday.
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