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Gus G. Sentementes | April 9, 2012
Big news today in the world of social media: Facebook plans to acquire Instagram for a whopping $1 billion in cash and shares. CEO Mark Zuckerberg broke the news himself , and wrote that Instagram will stay alive as an independent product. This is incredible news for Instagram, one of the most popular iPhone apps out there, which only just recently introduced an Android version. AllThingsD has a helpful breakdown of what an Instagram/Facebook union means , and how important the world of photo sharing is to Facebook.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Paul Spadaro walked along the edges of his backyard along the Magothy River and pointed to the shallow waters, clouded by a brown, murky mass. There was a time, the Severna Park resident said, that the waters were teeming with bay grasses that filtered the currents. Then came development, and natural shoreline gave way to wooden bulkheads and fertilized lawns that seep nutrients into the river. That created murkiness, he said, blocking the sunlight the plants needed to grow. To hear Spadaro tell the tale, Mother Nature would put greater Anne Arundel County in timeout if it were possible.
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FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | March 3, 1996
Since the unexamined life is not worth living, I recently took a long look at the way I make a cup of coffee. I tried to do this with a minimum of pretense and a maximum of common sense. I concentrated on the basics of beans, water and pot.Late one winter afternoon I found myself in the Coffee Mill, in Baltimore's Hampden neighborhood, sipping black coffee made from three different pots. The idea was to see how the three different types of filters in the pots affected the flavor of the coffee.
NEWS
October 1, 2012
Is anyone disturbed by the current trend of journalists reporting on social media, such as Twitter and Facebook, as if their contents were important breaking news? Does The Sun not aspire to be a respected, award-winning purveyor of serious journalism? If so, then please explain the purpose of reporting on one lone individual's tasteless tweet about Torrey Smith. Drawing any attention whatever to this inane tweet led to more reporting on Twitter's apology and Johns Hopkins' statement of disavowal.
NEWS
September 28, 1990
A memorial Mass for William L. Connelly Jr., a retired machinery filter salesman who had owned a filter company, will be offered at 2:30 p.m. tomorrow at St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Passionist Monastery Church, Old Frederick Road and Monastery Avenue.Mr. Connelly, 65, died Tuesday at Peninsula General Hospital in Salisbury after he had a heart attack while on vacation in Ocean City. He had lived in the Pittsburgh area for the past 15 years.The Baltimore native was a graduate of the Polytechnic Institute and Tulane University.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | May 2, 2003
Installation of filtration systems to reduce Baltimore County firefighters' exposure to diesel fuel emissions could begin as early as summer, county officials said. The $2 million system to filter the exhaust fumes from diesel-powered fire trucks and engines was one of the few new initiatives presented by County Executive James T. Smith Jr. in his budget message last month. If approved by the County Council, the cost will be spread over two years. Under the proposal, all 23 county-owned fire stations will receive the equipment to filter the toxic air, which has been a health concern for firefighters since the early 1980s.
NEWS
By Lisa M. Wiseman and Lisa M. Wiseman,Contributing Writer | June 14, 1992
In a June 15 article about water filter companies, the full name of one of the companies was omitted.The correct name is Advanced Filter Technologies Inc.Also, the retail price of the company's water filter, the Aquamax unit, should have been $189. The $630 price listed in the article is for a water dispenser unit that includes the filter.On a hot summer's day, nothing could be more pure and refreshing than a cold glass of ice water, right?But with the news about the chemical trichloroethylene (TCE)
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2002
LARRY COFFMAN has promised to change forever the way I look at development, so it's underwhelming when he pulls into exhibit A, an old IHOP in Bladensburg. Amid its asphalt and brick surrounds of highways, strip malls and parking lots, the pancake house features a single, smallish island of greenery to one side, maybe 60 feet by 20. But the little outpost of nature, with its shrubs, lush grass and native wildflowers, is far more than a belated nod to landscaping, Coffman explains. It is a "bio-retention cell," or "rain garden" -- an example of how development might proceed around the Chesapeake Bay without its current, guaranteed degradation of adjoining waterways.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | January 23, 1998
Environmental Elements Corp., a Baltimore maker of pollution-control devices, has won a $19 million contract to design and construct a gigantic air filter for a Wisconsin power company.The filter will be installed at Wisconsin Electric Power Co.'s Presque Isle Power Plant, located north of Marquette, Mich.E. H. Verdery, chairman and chief executive officer of Environmental Elements, said there is a "good probability" that the deal will lead to expansion and new hiring for the 52-year-old firm, though he said it was too early to give details.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 25, 1998
ROCKVILLE -- CellPro Inc. yesterday won the backing of a panel of government advisers to expand the use of its cell filtering device to help cancer patients safely rebuild immune systems destroyed by chemotherapy.The panel's recommendation, if accepted by the Food and Drug Administration, means the Ceprate device, used to filter and concentrate bone marrow cells taken from cancer patients, also would be approved for a less painful and cheaper technique that takes cells from the bloodstream instead.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | April 9, 2012
Big news today in the world of social media: Facebook plans to acquire Instagram for a whopping $1 billion in cash and shares. CEO Mark Zuckerberg broke the news himself , and wrote that Instagram will stay alive as an independent product. This is incredible news for Instagram, one of the most popular iPhone apps out there, which only just recently introduced an Android version. AllThingsD has a helpful breakdown of what an Instagram/Facebook union means , and how important the world of photo sharing is to Facebook.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2012
My mother's landscape is full of pachysandra and periwinkle ground cover, both of which are on invasive species lists. Do I need to pull all of it out this spring? These two are different from most non-native invasive plants. Yes, these popular groundcovers are invasive when they are planted adjacent to a natural or park area, where they'll expand indefinitely and crowd out native plants. However, in a typical yard, expansion can be controlled. And they do not produce berries that birds spread or seeds that blow or wash away.
NEWS
December 29, 2011
Your newspaper included two photos of the Polish Community Association's Christmas celebration on page 2 of the Dec. 24 edition. Unfortunately, the captions were not correct. We sang Christmas carols and hymns, not "seasonal songs. " We donned our Christmas finery for the event, not "holiday apparel. " We even stopped at three churches. Translation for my friends at the politically correct Sun: We were celebrating the birth of Jesus Christ. Merry Christmas! Maryann Nietubicz
NEWS
By Leah Davies and Allison Wilson | July 14, 2011
Every time it rains, buildings in the Chesapeake Bay watershed contribute to the bay's pollution. The culprit is stormwater runoff. Our impervious, hardscaped environment acts as a funnel for contaminants that speed down the sewer system into streams and lakes, eventually emptying into the Chesapeake. There just isn't enough greenery in the built environment to act as a natural filter for all the runoff. An important part of the path toward a healthier bay is to let the bay "build" the houses of the watershed - to design and construct bay-friendly homes.
BUSINESS
By Karen Youso and Karen Youso,McClatchy-Tribune | November 8, 2009
Every fall, we button up the house by cleaning and checking, fixing and sealing. Turns out that getting the house ready for winter isn't just a cold-winter thing - it's an eco-friendly thing, too. A tight house uses - and loses - less energy, requires fewer natural resources and produces less pollution. With just a bit of effort, you can make your fall house chores even greener. Here's how: Seal:: Gaps and spaces around windows and doors and in the attic can suck away up to 30 percent of your home's energy efficiency, according to the U.S. Department of Energy.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2009
The rain gardens that dot Ring Road on Anne Arundel Community College's campus have their roots in the mind of an honors student. Eileen Catte, 33, brainstormed the rain garden idea for her environmental science class. To earn honors credit, she agreed to assess whether the campus would benefit from tiny gardens strategically placed near storm water drains to slow rushing water and filter out impurities before they wash into larger bodies of water. With guidance from biology professor Susan Lamont, Catte determined that rain gardens would stop erosion near the walking trail on the Arnold campus and help prevent nitrogen and phosphorus from running into Mill and Dividing creeks.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2004
Olympic teammates share many things in the course of training: workload, strategy and private pep talks to name a few. Sailors Carol Cronin, Liz Filter and Nancy Haberland share those things and one more -- body weight. Four hundred fifty-one pounds, to be exact. That's all their nimble 21-foot Yngling sailboat will be allowed to carry in competition beginning next Saturday. "Divide it up any way you want," said Filter, laughing. "Just don't go over." There can be no secrets of the scales, no little white lies because adding blubber makes for landlubbers.
BUSINESS
By Karen Youso and Karen Youso,McClatchy-Tribune | November 8, 2009
Every fall, we button up the house by cleaning and checking, fixing and sealing. Turns out that getting the house ready for winter isn't just a cold-winter thing - it's an eco-friendly thing, too. A tight house uses - and loses - less energy, requires fewer natural resources and produces less pollution. With just a bit of effort, you can make your fall house chores even greener. Here's how: Seal:: Gaps and spaces around windows and doors and in the attic can suck away up to 30 percent of your home's energy efficiency, according to the U.S. Department of Energy.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | February 10, 2008
Noel Blair Hunter Cochrane, founder and president of an industrial valve and filtering business, died of a respiratory ailment Feb. 3 at his Lutherville home. He was 88. Born in London on Christmas Day and known as Blair, he emigrated at age 3 with his family to the United States. His father, great-grandnephew of Adm. Lord Thomas Cochrane, 10th Earl of Dundonald, was recruited to work in the United States. The elder Mr. Cochrane was chief financial officer of the newly opened Lord Baltimore Hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2007
Hometown -- Washington/Baltimore Current members --Nathan Graham, drums and vocals; Greg Maly, guitars and vocals; Blake Mobley, keyboards and vocals; Bradley Richmond, bass and vocals; Colin Woods, mandolin and vocals Founded in --2005 Style --jazz funk Influenced by --Jamiroquai, Herbie Hancock, DJ Shadow, the New Deal, the Band Notable --When Basshound was writing and recording its self-titled first EP last year, every member contributed to...
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