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By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2010
He has worked in television, film and stage in London, Los Angeles and points in between, and now spends a fair amount of time lecturing on a luxury cruise ship. But the biggest constant in Robert Neal Marshall's life could be filmmaking. His grandfather's career in newsreels was catapulted by footage of Charles Lindbergh's historic flight to Paris in 1927, and Marshall's mother was a television and stage actress in New York, so the Columbia resident comes by his flair for visual and performing arts naturally, he said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2010
One of the marks of an artist is his or her ability to take something that we think we know inside and out and then show it to us in such a way that we see it in a totally different light. The great artists also often evoke a deep emotional response in us as part of that process. Ken Burns, public television's documentary filmmaker laureate, does that with Baltimore Orioles legend Cal Ripken in his new production, "The Tenth Inning," set to premiere Sept. 28 and 29 on PBS. Burns and his co-director, Lynn Novick, showed clips from the new film and fielded questions from staffers at The Baltimore Sun last week.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2010
Shanlei Cardwell could not fathom why so many people had wanted to kill the engaging old man standing before her. Meredith O'Connell laughed at his jokes and wondered how he had the spirit to tell them after all he'd endured. Both teenagers sensed that they'd be talking about Leo Bretholz for decades to come, that they would take on a small part of the quest that has driven him for almost 50 years. For all that time, Bretholz has crisscrossed the Baltimore area telling his harrowing tale of eluding capture and death as an Austrian Jew living in Europe through the Holocaust.
FEATURES
By Betsy Sharkey and Betsy Sharkey,Tribune Newspapers | January 22, 2010
"Extraordinary Measures," starring Brendan Fraser and Harrison Ford, is a desperate drama of a father racing against time to find a cure for a rare genetic disease that is killing two of his children. So you know going in that the challenge for director Tom Vaughan is how to handle the science and the sentiment - tear-soaked terrain that has proved difficult for filmmakers over the years, from "Love Story" to "Lorenzo's Oil." Vaughan opts for restraint on both fronts, giving us a life-and-death story that feels brisk, businesslike and oddly emotionless as we follow the deterioration of the kids and the difficulties of the research, as well as the business of turning a scientific theory into a life-saving and, just as important, a profit-generating treatment.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | November 29, 2009
Jim Lucio hadn't made a movie in years. But the combination of Edgar Allan Poe and the chance to have his work shown at the Baltimore Museum of Art proved irresistible. "I set out to make it funny; I hope it comes out this way," says Lucio of "APE," a film "very loosely" based on "The Murders In the Rue Morgue," which will be one of 17 Poe-inspired shorts to be shown at the BMA over the next two Fridays. "I haven't really made a film in years, since the '80s. But surprisingly, when I saw the finished product, it didn't stray too much from the visions I had in the '80s.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow | michael.sragow@baltsun.com | November 13, 2009
Casting director Pat Moran, a co-founder of John Waters' Dreamland Films, helped create the human tapestries that give Waters' midnight specials their Fellini-like ebullience. But she has also done her part to imbue such Barry Levinson memory plays as "Avalon" and "Liberty Heights" with their gnarly warmth and David Simon's hard-hitting TV shows, "The Corner" and "The Wire," with their bluesy grit. On the eve of the famous trio's first joint appearance for the Maryland Film Festival (Saturday night at MICA's Brown Hall)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | November 13, 2009
Casting director Pat Moran, a co-founder of John Waters' Dreamland Films, helped create the human tapestries that give Waters' midnight specials their Fellini-like ebullience. But she has also done her part to imbue such Barry Levinson memory plays as "Avalon" and "Liberty Heights" with their gnarly warmth and David Simon's hard-hitting TV shows, "The Corner" and "The Wire," with their bluesy grit. On the eve of the famous trio's first joint appearance for the Maryland Film Festival (Saturday night at MICA's Brown Hall)
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,Jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | October 11, 2009
It's a breezy morning in eastern Annapolis. Sea gulls squawk overhead. Boats bob beside a dock. And on the deck of a tied-up charter vessel, two folk musicians in ball caps strum a shuffle on a banjo and ukelele, looking every inch the easy-living Jimmy Buffetts of the Chesapeake. It's the final day of shooting for "Seize the Bay," the latest creation from Daphne Glover and Bob Ferrier, filmmakers from Severna Park, and as the two roll videotape, neither one can suppress a smile. "Fantastic," says Ferrier, the director, clapping his hands as the music ends.
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