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NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2012
Oscar-nominated director Josh Fox was arrested on Wednesday at a public hearing chaired by Maryland Rep. Andy Harris, a Capitol Police spokeswoman confirmed. Fox, whose 2010 documentary “Gasland” raised environmental concerns about the natural gas mining process known as fracking, was attempting to film a hearing of the House Subcommittee on Energy and Environment that was focused on the issue. The hearing, titled “fractured science,” was intended to question the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's finding that the fracking process has likely been responsible for groundwater contamination.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 25, 2011
Wallace "Wally" Henry Coberg, a theatrical designer and filmmaker who was at work on a new Edgar Allan Poe documentary, died of an apparent heart attack Nov. 18 at his Bolton Hill home. He was 63. Born in New York, N.Y, he lived in Edison, N.J., and Perrysburg, Ohio, before moving to Bel Air and graduating from Bel Air High School in 1966. He attended Boston University, Towson University and earned a degree at the Maryland Institute College of Art . In a 1974 Sun interview, he said he made a construction paper set at age 8 after watching Mary Martin play "Peter Pan" on television.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2011
The holiday movie season is a crowded beast. So we asked filmmaker Hilton Carter, a MICA grad who now lives in Los Angeles, to give us his picks for what he can't wait to see. Carter, 31, whose dark short film "Moth" aired earlier this year on HBO, cut his teeth directing music videos for the likes of Blaqstarr and E Major. His latest project, heist comedy "One Last Run," will tentatively begin filming in Baltimore in mid-December (read more about the project and contribute on kickstarter.com)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2011
"Witch's Brew," the latest effort from horrific Baltimore director Chris LaMartina, gets its world premiere at the Charles Theatre Wednesday night. The movie, filmed in and around Baltimore over the past two years, offers the twisted tale of a couple local brewmasters who run afoul of a witch. The results are predictably horrifying — especially to those unlucky enough to sample their "Slacker Lager. " As the movie's tagline so succinctly puts it, "Liver damage will be the LEAST of your problems.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2011
While the War of 1812 might be known as "America's Forgotten War" elsewhere, that's definitely not the case in Baltimore and Maryland. Our obsession with all things 1812 is one of the regional characteristics so pronounced that it is lampooned in "The Second City Does Baltimore" satire now running at Center Stage . And Monday night, area viewers will have the chance to feed that appetite with two hours of a carefully researched documentary about...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2011
The morning after an independent filmmaker heard he's been given a $25,000 arts award, he tried to assess what the check would mean. Matthew Porterfield, who walked away with the Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize on Saturday, worked seven years as a waiter at the Chameleon Cafe in Northeast Baltimore to support himself as an artist who made films the way he wanted. In his top-earning year, he once made $30,000 as a kindergarten teacher. Many years he made less than $12,000, despite high critical praise for his cinematic treatments involving the lives of people living in the Northeast Baltimore, where he was born and still resides.
NEWS
Baltimore Sun staff | July 9, 2011
Matthew Porterfield, the filmmaker behind "Putty Hill" and "Hamilton," was named the winner of the sixth annual Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize on Saturday. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and the Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts announced the winner of the $25,000 fellowship given every year in conjunction with Artscape at the Baltimore Museum of Art , where his installation is on display. "I'm speechless. To be a finalist among such fine artists is such an honor," Porterfield said Saturday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2011
Richard Yeagley fueled his punchy new film, "The Tradesmen: Making an Art of Work," with a fierce hometown nostalgia. This first-time documentary maker grew up near Loch Raven High School — he's a 2002 graduate — and went to Stevenson University when it was still called Villa Julie College. Film degree in hand, he took off for Los Angeles, where he found ready employment; during one stint at Toyota, he helped craft the multi-DVD history of the car manufacturer's first half-century in America.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2011
Common kept his cool last week — and his artistic faith. While controversy swirled around his appearance at the White House for a poetry reading, the rapper-actor was anchoring a movie in Baltimore that should quiet even those pundits who tried to paint him as a gangsta. With concentration and intensity, he was helping first-time writer-director Sheldon Candis and a superb ensemble flesh out a script that proves (among other things) that gangsterism doesn't pay. "LUV" — it stands for "Learning Uncle Vincent" — captures the turning point in the life of an 11-year-old boy named Woody (Michael Rainey Jr)
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