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NEWS
By Barry Levinson | February 6, 2013
There is joy in Charm City. The Baltimore Ravens are the champions of the football world. Tuesday, upon the Ravens' return from the Super Bowl in New Orleans, hundreds of thousands of fans lined the streets of Baltimore and filled the football stadium. The city was euphoric and the fan base ecstatic. For the second time in this new century, Baltimore's Ravens are the best team in football. And yet, if not for one man, none of this would have been possible. If not for one man, there would be no Ravens football team.
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EXPLORE
By Gwendolyn Glenn | January 31, 2013
On Capitol Hill, in African-American churches and at historically black colleges and universities, people are talking about a documentary film that challenges negative reports and statistics regarding blacks, especially black men. "Hoodwinked," produced by former Laurel resident Janks Morton, debuted in fall 2012 during the Congressional Black Caucus' annual legislative weekend, and is now being shown at special screenings around the country....
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2012
The Hubble Space Telescope has captured distant reaches of the universe over the past 22 years, but with the end of the space shuttle program, has not been repaired since 2009. A filmmaker is challenging that decision with the documentary "Saving Hubble" and will speak in Baltimore on Tuesday. David Gaynes will speak at the Space Telescope Science Institute with his message about saving Hubble, which is expected to continue operating only through next year. NASA is focused on replacing Hubble with the James Webb Space Telescope in 2018.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2012
CineMaryland, a television newsmagazine devoted to films and filmmaking in Maryland that has been available to local TV stations for 15 years, is going off the air. "We had a run of over 15 years, but at the end, nobody was watching," said show host and co-producer Rebecca Jessop. "It wasn't a tough decision to make, but it was sad. " Produced out of Howard Community College, CineMaryland had been broadcast on educational channels in Baltimore, Howard, Harford and Carroll counties, as well as other areas throughout the state.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2012
Baltimore Councilman Nick J. Mosby has Tweeted himself into a movie role. He'll be playing himself -- a guy who Tweets a lot. With just over 500 followers, the District 7 representative might not be the biggest presence on Twitter. But he's apparently being followed by the right people. He'll be one of 140 personalities from the millions on the social media site included in a documentary called "Follow Friday. " The documentary portrays filmmaker Erin Faulk as she travels the country to meet and interview 140 of the people she follows on Twitter.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2012
Matters of faith continue to divide people in dreadful ways, but there has always been at least one thing that religions have in common - the urge to express belief through art. That's a point driven home in a sumptuous 90-minute documentary by Baltimore filmmaker Robert Gardner airing this week on PBS. "Islamic Art: Mirror of the Invisible World," narrated by Susan Sarandon, provides a welcome look into a cultural legacy little known and little...
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2012
Nora Ephron was really all about the food. An acerbic observer of life whose wit translated so easily to the big screen, she was often as interested in the menu as she was in the script, and her appetite for moviemaking and crab cakes brought her to Baltimore in the early 1990s for the filming of "Sleepless in Seattle. " Ephron, who died Tuesday after a battle with leukemia, was called in to doctor a screenplay about a long-distance love affair between an architect in Seattle (Tom Hanks)
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2012
When a group of Betsy Adelman's students at Ellicott Mills Middle School learned that a low-pressure air zone created by wind turbines could kill endangered bats by causing their lungs to burst, they set about making a 41/2 -minute documentary instead of writing an essay. Titled"Gone with the Wind,"it was shown during a nonjuried screening of environmental films by the American Film Institute at the AFI Silver Theatre and Cultural Center in Silver Spring. Now it will get a second look as a tool for teaching teachers.
NEWS
By Barry Levinson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2012
There are a lot of stories I remember reading in The Sun , many of them about sports - the story about Baltimore getting an NFL football team, and the story about the St. Louis Browns moving to Baltimore. But the review of "Diner" is the one that sticks out, because "Diner" was the first movie I wrote and directed, and The Evening Sun 's Lou Cedrone, who reviewed it, was an established and important critic in Baltimore at that time. It was one of those reviews where you pick it up and go, "Oh, my God. This is devastating.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
"Lovely Molly," the horrific tale of a woman either demonically possessed or tragically insane, may be the film that makes Eduardo Sanchez someone other than one of the guys responsible for 1999's "The Blair Witch Project. " Which would be fine with the Maryland-raised filmmaker, whose movie gets its local premiere tonight to cap the first day of the 14th Maryland Film Festival. "I love being one of the guys that did 'Blair Witch,' but I'm really proud of 'Lovely Molly,'" Sanchez, 44, said about the film he shot last fall in and around Hagerstown.
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