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April 7, 2011
Jason Winer comes to feature films from TV's "Modern Family. " But he always dreamed that someday he'd make movies. These are three of the filmmakers who helped shape his approach to directing: Woody Allen "From an early age, I was oddly into Woody Allen — like, when I was 7 years old. From a very early age, I enjoyed watching 'Annie Hall.' I watched it again in preparation for 'Arthur' because it was another iconic New York movie. I was watching it and wondering, 'What did I possibly love about it when I was 8 years old?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
I took a deep dive last week into Baltimore's drug scene. And when I finally came up for air, I had a newfound clarity on the city's troubled TV image and the line between responsible documentary filmmaking and exploitative reality television. Online Monday, I previewed a National Geographic Channel program that depicted Baltimore as a drug-infested wasteland of vacant rowhouses and lost lives. It's titled “Drugs, Inc.: The High Wire,”and if you missed it last week, you can see it again this week at 8 p.m. Wednesday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2011
Common kept his cool last week — and his artistic faith. While controversy swirled around his appearance at the White House for a poetry reading, the rapper-actor was anchoring a movie in Baltimore that should quiet even those pundits who tried to paint him as a gangsta. With concentration and intensity, he was helping first-time writer-director Sheldon Candis and a superb ensemble flesh out a script that proves (among other things) that gangsterism doesn't pay. "LUV" — it stands for "Learning Uncle Vincent" — captures the turning point in the life of an 11-year-old boy named Woody (Michael Rainey Jr)
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
The Maryland Institute College of Art announced Wednesday that it will launch a master's program in filmmaking and will run it out of a historic Station North theater that will be home to both MICA and the Johns Hopkins University's film programs. The master of fine arts in filmmaking program will begin in fall 2015 and be led by Patrick Wright, who co-produced the 2010 Oscar-winning short documentary, "Music by Prudence," and other films on HIV/AIDS, clergy sexual abuse, and political commentator Ann Coulter.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2011
The 2011 Maryland Film Festival showcases an extraordinary number of movies by filmmakers who grew up in Baltimore or have adopted it as their hometown. Here are a feature director, a documentary maker and a creator of avant-garde fantasy talking about making movies in Mobtown. Josh Slates' "Small Pond" is about a girl who's floundering in the provincial life of Columbia, Mo. Slates says he filmed it in the summer of 2009 as part of a brief homecoming and sabbatical in the Show-Me State.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
The Maryland Institute College of Art announced Wednesday that it will launch a master's program in filmmaking and will run it out of a historic Station North theater that will be home to both MICA and the Johns Hopkins University's film programs. The master of fine arts in filmmaking program will begin in fall 2015 and be led by Patrick Wright, who co-produced the 2010 Oscar-winning short documentary, "Music by Prudence," and other films on HIV/AIDS, clergy sexual abuse, and political commentator Ann Coulter.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 28, 2005
The work of African-American filmmakers will be spotlighted in a touring film and discussion series opening in Baltimore next week. The National Black History Month Film & Discussion series, sponsored by Next Generation Awareness Foundation Inc., kicks off Feb. 5 with a daylong program of local and national films at the Maryland Institute College of Art's Brown Center, 1300 Mount Royal Ave. Included in the day's itinerary is a poetry showcase hosted by...
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 31, 2006
A trio of local guys are making good cinematically over the next few days, further evidence of the strength of Baltimore's standing as a still-nascent, but increasingly visible film colony. In theaters throughout Maryland today - indeed, in theaters throughout the country - Harford County's own Chris Robinson, a respected veteran of the music-video scene, makes his feature-length directing debut with ATL, a drama of depth and sensitivity about a group of African-American kids struggling to come of age on the often-unforgiving streets of Atlanta.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr | January 20, 1992
It's the little things about Baltimore that make Darryl Wharton want to create movies here -- like women's hairstyles.They're so "structured" and so sophisticated and so meticulously maintained, he explains. He knows women from other East Coast cities who come here just to get their hair done.Mr. Wharton is intrigued also by the way Baltimoreans talk. It's ideal for movie characters, he says."People in Baltimore have a definite vocal distinction about them," Mr. Wharton says.But, mostly, it's a great place for him to launch his movie-making career because the city is home for him and three other members of Middle Passage Cinema, his production company.
NEWS
By Bill Gilmore and Hannah Byron | February 24, 2005
AS PERHAPS NEVER before, Baltimore is on the radar screen of the country's moviemakers. For the first time, the city made MovieMaker magazine's list of "Top 10 Cities for Movie Makers," the fifth annual countdown of the best cities for independents to live in and make movies. Editors of the industry publication interviewed writers, directors, location scouts, film office representatives and dozens of cinematographers about their favorite cities in which to live and work. Baltimore ranked ninth, ahead of Orlando, Fla., Atlanta and San Diego, and among heavyweights such as New York, Los Angeles, Chicago and Miami.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
Trust John Waters to never go for the easy choice. "Abuse of Weakness," the latest work from controversial French filmmaker Catherine Breillat, is Waters' pick for this year's Maryland Film Festival, set for May 7-11, largely in the Station North Arts District. The film, which is getting its Maryland premiere, stars Isabelle Huppert as a director who, after suffering a stroke, is victimized by a notorious con man. It is based on a similar incident that happened to Breillat, who spent five months in a hospital recovering from a 2004 stroke.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2014
Filmmakers David Posamentier and Geoff Moore knew Annapolis was the perfect place to make their movie when someone heaved a trash can through a plate-glass window - and no one made a peep. The someone was actor Sam Rockwell, who stars in "Better Living Through Chemistry" as a nebbishy small-town pharmacist unexpectedly displaying a chemically enhanced backbone. The place was State Circle in Annapolis, just across the street from the Maryland State House. Posamentier and Moore were shooting a scene that involved Rockwell's character vandalizing his own pharmacy.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
Patricia W. Waters, a homemaker, Anglophile and mother of filmmaker John Waters, died Saturday of complications from a fall and recent surgery at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. She was 89. "She was our matriarch. She was an unusually strong and loving mother who was lovely and taught me the articles of good taste, which I turned into a career," said John S. Waters Jr. "She was equally proud of all of her children and their different lives. " "First of all, she was the epitome of a lady, and she was a mentor to me," said Martha Ann Robinson, a longtime friend.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2013
The "Diner" guys, Tracy Turnblad and the moody teens of Hamilton will be basking in the New York spotlight this month, thanks to a Museum of Modern Art exhibition focusing on the works of Baltimore filmmakers Barry Levinson, John Waters and Matt Porterfield. "Our Town: Baltimore," running through Dec. 24 at the venerable Manhattan art showcase, opens Thursday with Levinson's 1982 "Diner," an ode to '50s-era Colts fanaticism and the shift from the easy answers of adolescence to the complicated relationships of adulthood.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
Halloween night. 1987. Paranormal researcher Frank Stewart and his team try to prove an abandoned home is haunted. A local network camera crew is along for the ride, taping the EVP recordings and call-in seance. After the broadcast, Stewart and his team vanish. Too good to be true? It is. A good premise for a movie? It definitely is. With the "WNUF Halloween Special," screening Friday at the Creative Alliance , Baltimore filmmakers Chris LaMartina and Jimmy George (well, they're technically dubbed "archivists" on this project)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2013
Baltimore native Babatunde Salaam began working with New Lens, a youth-driven social justice organization that utilizes art to help explore different community perspectives, as a way to receive community service hours. Little did he know that his time there would create friendship and foster a passion for community outreach. At New Lens, Salaam participated in a discussion on cops and their interactions with the community, and found his inspiration. At 16, he created a documentary film, "Kids and Cops," illustrating the difficult relationship between Baltimore youths and the Police Department through nonprofit New Lens.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 21, 2006
If you're a documentary maker, American history can be yours, but only at a price that may include your independence. For many of America's leading documentary artists, that's the message of the deal recently sealed between Showtime Networks Inc. and the Smithsonian Institution. Documentary filmmakers who intend to base their work substantially on the Smithsonian collection or interviews with its staff now must have their proposals reviewed by a new company called Smithsonian Networks, which is starting Smithsonian on Demand, a pay cable service, in December.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | June 14, 2009
A record number of teams, 53 as of Friday afternoon, are out frantically making movies in and around Baltimore this weekend, part of the annual exercise in creative cinematic anarchy otherwise known as the 48-Hour Film Project. "There will be at least 500 people out on the streets," said Rob Hatch, project organizer for Baltimore. "If they're aiming something at you, it's just a camera." Under the competition's rules, teams of filmmakers have exactly 48 hours to make a film between four and seven minutes long.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2013
Charlie "Fruit Man" McLean has been "a-rabbing" in Baltimore for more than 40 years, and he still can't think of a better way to spend his time. As a boy, he rode with the men who sold fresh produce in the streets from their brightly colored horse-drawn wagons. He made the job his life's work. Even now, he says, he can get fresh food to people who might otherwise never see it. McLean, 53, is one of only about 10 people still "a-rabbing," as Baltimoreans have long called his line of work.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
Talk about a great story just falling into your lap. Baltimore filmmaker Ramona Diaz can't help but chuckle while recounting how she first heard about Arnel Pineda, the unlikely successor to Steve Perry as lead singer for Journey and the subject of her latest documentary, "Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's Journey," which is showing Tuesday at the Charles Theatre. "I heard about Arnel getting the gig through an unsolicited email," she says, "that connected me with a link that was sort of going viral among the Filipino community.
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