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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
A tentative deal was reached Thursday in Annapolis to increase tax credits for film and television productions shot in Maryland, in a bid to keep popular TV series like "House of Cards" and "Veep" from abandoning the state. A joint conference committee on the budget agreed to provide up to $18.5 million in film tax credits, significantly more than the $7.5 million that Gov. Martin O'Malley had originally proposed. Media Rights Capital, the California company producing the Netflix series "House of Cards," warned state officials by letter that it was putting off work on the show's third season until it could be assured that sufficient tax credits would be approved.
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FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
Playwright, film director and LGBT cult favorite Del Shores will be in Baltimore on Sunday for a meet-and-greet with fans, a costume contest and a double billing of two of his films: "Sordid Lives" and "Southern Baptist Sissies. " The ticket-only event was put together as an early offering from B'More QFest , which is hosting a four-day film and media festival in Baltimore in June, of which Gay in Maryland is a sponsor. The event Sunday is being called the "Southern Tragic Humor Double Bill" -- perhaps for obvious reasons.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2014
As the General Assembly enters the final week of its 90-day session, lawmakers have fewer issues coming down to the wire than in a typical year — but some that remain are very thorny indeed. A proposal to raise the minimum wage, Gov. Martin O'Malley's top priority in his last year as governor, is stalled by a key senator's demand that the state also increase the pay of workers who care for the developmentally disabled. The House and Senate are wrangling over how much money to devote to a tax break intended to keep the production of the hit TV series "House of Cards" in Maryland.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
Responding to a threat that the "House of Cards" television series may leave Maryland if it doesn't get more tax credits, the House of Delegates adopted budget language Thursday requiring the state to seize the production company's property if it stops filming in the state. Media Rights Capital, the Beverly Hills, Calif., company producing the popular Netflix show, wrote Gov. Martin O'Malley that it was putting off work on its third season until it could be assured that sufficient tax credits would be approved.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
For documentary filmmakers and Annapolis residents Patti White and Lee Anderson, establishing a film festival in their hometown wasn't a labor of love. It was a no-brainer. White and Anderson, business partners since 1990 when they founded an Annapolis-based production company now known as Filmsters, have traveled the film-festival circuit across America and always believed Maryland's capital was a natural for an industry "close-up. " "We've been to festivals in Colorado Springs - they have mountains, we have water - but the towns are not much different," White said.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
You can't see the Higgs boson, but you can watch its discovery. Scientists crowd around dozens of monitors as they collect data from experiments using a looping 17-mile underground tunnel and equipment likened to a five-story Swiss watch. They worry what the media might say if tests fail, and wonder whether the experiment should have been conducted in secret. And they clamor for a seat in the auditorium where physicists will present their findings in the hunt for the elusive "God particle," a subatomic building block that existed only in theory, but had never been detected.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
A bill to boost Maryland's film production tax credit cleared the Senate Monday night. The measure, approved 45 to 1, authorizes $18.5 million in tax credits the state may award in the next fiscal year for movie and television productions. The credit had been increased this year from $7.5 million to $25 million, but was set to return to the lower level next year, according to the Department of Legislative Services. Supporters have argued that without more tax credits, the state could lose lucrative projects like the Netflix series "House of Cards," which has filmed much of its first two seasons at sites in Harford County and Baltimore, including renting space in the Baltimore Sun building.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2014
Filmmakers David Posamentier and Geoff Moore knew Annapolis was the perfect place to make their movie when someone heaved a trash can through a plate-glass window - and no one made a peep. The someone was actor Sam Rockwell, who stars in "Better Living Through Chemistry" as a nebbishy small-town pharmacist unexpectedly displaying a chemically enhanced backbone. The place was State Circle in Annapolis, just across the street from the Maryland State House. Posamentier and Moore were shooting a scene that involved Rockwell's character vandalizing his own pharmacy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
For L. Bryan Koerber, president of Baltimore's Budeke's Paints & Decorating Inc., losing film projects like Netflix's "House of Cards" to another state would be devastating. Not fatal, perhaps, but devastating. "The impact on us is huge," Koerber told the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee on Thursday in Annapolis, during a hearing on a proposal to authorize $18.5 million in tax credits during the coming fiscal year for movie and television production in Maryland. Supplying paint and paint supplies to both "House of Cards" and HBO's "Veep" for the past two years has enabled his company to purchase new equipment and preserve jobs, he said, as well as award his employees a wage increase for the first time since 2009.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
The Baltimore Police Department has instituted a new policy that prohibits officers from stopping people from taping or photographing police actions, the agency said Wednesday. The new rules were unveiled as the city agreed to pay $250,000 to settle a lawsuit filed by a man who says police seized his cellphone and deleted the video of an arrest at the Preakness Stakes in 2010. "Four years ago, if we had taken the complaint seriously and addressed it in a very rapid manner, we may not be sitting here today," Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony Batts said Wednesday.
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