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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
Next month's Maryland Film Festival will feature the local debut of "Ping Pong Summer," writer-director Michael Tully's coming-of-age tale set in Ocean City in the 1980s and starring Susan Sarandon, Lea Thompson, John Hannah and Amy Sedaris. Tully's film, which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in January, was included in Wednesday's announcement of the first 10 movies scheduled for the festival, set to run May 7-11 at the Maryland Institute College of Art and other venues, mostly in the area of the Station North Arts and Entertainment District.
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NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
The potential pool of cash available for the film industry shrank by $3.5 million in the final minutes of the General Assembly session, leaving lawmakers asking: Is $15 million enough for "House of Cards" to stay? The Netflix political thriller, which filmed some of its second season in the Maryland State House, received more than $26 million in taxpayer money over the past two years to film in the state. When the O'Malley administration offered only $4 million in tax incentives for filming this year, the production company pushed back filming for its third season and threatened to break down its sets and move elsewhere.
NEWS
By David Horsey | April 8, 2014
Until Film director Darren Aronofsky got his hands on it, the old tale of Noah's Ark had devolved into a cute children's fable of giraffes and elephants and bears and bunnies crowding onto a big boat. Aronofsky has re-envisioned it as what it really has always been: an apocalyptic, end-of-the-world disaster story. Biblical literalists, though, are not entirely happy about this new telling of one of the most ancient stories in the Judeo-Christian tradition. Aronofsky's "Noah" opened Friday in theaters across America and the big question for Paramount, the studio that paid more than $130 million to produce the film, is whether the large Christian audience that showed up for Mel Gibson's "The Passion of the Christ" and the more recent "Son of God" will pay to see what Aronofsky has called "the least biblical film ever made.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
Bruce Joel Rubin, who won an Academy Award for his screenplay for the 1990 hit movie "Ghost," did not feel a compelling need to revisit the work. Not long after the film's release - it went on to earn half a billion dollars worldwide - Paramount Pictures asked Rubin to write a sequel to the story of a young man named Sam who, after being murdered during a mugging, hangs around in ectoplasmic form to keep his beloved Molly from danger. Rubin resisted the studio's overtures. "I really didn't know where to take it," he says.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2014
Netflix's Capitol Hill drama "House of Cards" may receive millions more in tax credits to continue filming in Maryland, now that the General Assembly has agreed to make more funding available. But the local arts community may not like the politics. To secure the extra funding, the General Assembly authorized state economic developers to dip into a $2.5 million pot of money called the Special Fund for the Preservation of Cultural Arts. It was created in 2009 to support arts organizations.
NEWS
By Kevin Klowden and Arthur Greenwald | April 3, 2014
Life imitated art recently in Maryland as the producers of "House of Cards" played political hardball with state officials. MRC Productions filmed the first two seasons of the hit series in Maryland, and, evoking Frank Underwood — the ruthless politician played by Kevin Spacey — MRC officials said "we will have to break down our stage, sets and offices and set up in another state" if Maryland doesn't provide another $15 million in production incentives....
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
A tentative deal was reached Thursday in Annapolis to increase tax credits for film and television productions shot in Maryland, in a bid to keep popular TV series like "House of Cards" and "Veep" from abandoning the state. A joint conference committee on the budget agreed to provide up to $18.5 million in film tax credits, significantly more than the $7.5 million that Gov. Martin O'Malley had originally proposed. Media Rights Capital, the California company producing the Netflix series "House of Cards," warned state officials by letter that it was putting off work on the show's third season until it could be assured that sufficient tax credits would be approved.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
Playwright, film director and LGBT cult favorite Del Shores will be in Baltimore on Sunday for a meet-and-greet with fans, a costume contest and a double billing of two of his films: "Sordid Lives" and "Southern Baptist Sissies. " The ticket-only event was put together as an early offering from B'More QFest , which is hosting a four-day film and media festival in Baltimore in June, of which Gay in Maryland is a sponsor. The event Sunday is being called the "Southern Tragic Humor Double Bill" -- perhaps for obvious reasons.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2014
As the General Assembly enters the final week of its 90-day session, lawmakers have fewer issues coming down to the wire than in a typical year — but some that remain are very thorny indeed. A proposal to raise the minimum wage, Gov. Martin O'Malley's top priority in his last year as governor, is stalled by a key senator's demand that the state also increase the pay of workers who care for the developmentally disabled. The House and Senate are wrangling over how much money to devote to a tax break intended to keep the production of the hit TV series "House of Cards" in Maryland.
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