Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFilm Stock
IN THE NEWS

Film Stock

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By KEVIN SMOKLER | August 19, 1994
I magine going to the Louvre and noticing horrible changes. The Mona Lisa's smile has blurred into a muddy frown. The once brilliant colors of the Flemish masters have deteriorated to sludge.This horrifying vision is the reality of America's film history.The National Center for Film and Video Preservation (NCFVP) estimates that of the 21,000 feature films made before 1951, "only half exist today."Most of the remainder are falling victim to deterioration of their nitrate stock, the highly reactive substance base of pre-1951 film.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1999
Making any movie is hard enough, what with financing, temperamental actors, expensive equipment and location shooting to worry about.But making the sort of film playing at the local cineplex is a walk in the park compared with making an IMAX film like "Olympic Glory," which opens tomorrow at the Maryland Science Center's IMAX Theater.Just ask producer Frank Marshall. An impressive resume that includes "Raiders of the Lost Ark," "Who Framed Roger Rabbit" and "The Color Purple" hardly prepared him for the special challenges inherent in shooting film in 70mm -- twice the size of standard film stock -- to be shown on a screen 55 feet high.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN STAFF | May 8, 1998
Super-8 -- the film stock that captured thousands of home movies during the 1960s (not to mention the Zapruder film) -- has enjoyed something of a resurgence of late. The grainy, super-saturated look is a chic addition to music videos, television commercials and even feature films ("The Game," "U-Turn," "L.A. Confidential" and Joel Schumacher's upcoming "8 Millimeter" being a few recent examples).What many filmgoers don't realize is that Super-8 films have a long and storied life in the avant-garde: The cheap portability of equipment you can buy at most flea markets, as well as the rich tonal values of the film, have long attracted filmmakers who make experimental, non-narrative films.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN STAFF | May 8, 1998
Super-8 -- the film stock that captured thousands of home movies during the 1960s (not to mention the Zapruder film) -- has enjoyed something of a resurgence of late. The grainy, super-saturated look is a chic addition to music videos, television commercials and even feature films ("The Game," "U-Turn," "L.A. Confidential" and Joel Schumacher's upcoming "8 Millimeter" being a few recent examples).What many filmgoers don't realize is that Super-8 films have a long and storied life in the avant-garde: The cheap portability of equipment you can buy at most flea markets, as well as the rich tonal values of the film, have long attracted filmmakers who make experimental, non-narrative films.
ENTERTAINMENT
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1999
Making any movie is hard enough, what with financing, temperamental actors, expensive equipment and location shooting to worry about.But making the sort of film playing at the local cineplex is a walk in the park compared with making an IMAX film like "Olympic Glory," which opens tomorrow at the Maryland Science Center's IMAX Theater.Just ask producer Frank Marshall. An impressive resume that includes "Raiders of the Lost Ark," "Who Framed Roger Rabbit" and "The Color Purple" hardly prepared him for the special challenges inherent in shooting film in 70mm -- twice the size of standard film stock -- to be shown on a screen 55 feet high.
NEWS
By Stephen Hudak and Martin Comas and Stephen Hudak and Martin Comas,Orlando Sentinel | September 24, 2006
LEESBURG, Fla. -- Leesburg police released yesterday a note Melinda Duckett wrote just before she killed herself Sept. 8 at her grandparents' home. Duckett wrote a letter addressed to the "public," in which she spoke of her love for her missing 2-year-old son and the anguish she felt at being "faced with ridicule and criticism" as rumors swirled about her role in his disappearance. After completing the unsigned, two-page letter, the 21-year-old left it on the dashboard of her car, then took a shotgun and killed herself inside a closet at her grandparents' Lady Lake, Fla., home.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 17, 1996
They found "Gone With the Wind."And you didn't even know it was lost? Well, prints of the original 1939 acetate-base, Technicolor dye version have self-destructed over the years, infuriating purists the world over. What's been shown since the 50-year "restoration" of 1989 is a version whose brighter, more modern colors did not match the original palette of the Selznick production.But in a salt mine in Kansas, someone has discovered what has to be the closest version to the original Technicolor release print in 1939, a nearly perfect acetate Technicolor print evidently struck in 1966 for one videotaping.
NEWS
March 2, 1993
Actress Lillian Gish, who died Saturday at age 99, enjoyed a movie career that spanned nearly the entire history of the motion picture industry. She first appeared before the camera in 1909, at the age of 16, in a short film by the pioneering American director D.W. Griffith. Her last movie performance, as an indomitable old woman in "The Whales of August," came in 1987, when she co-starred with another screen legend, Bette Davis.Ms. Gish, whose family lived briefly in Baltimore during the 1890s, was only 5 when she made her acting debut.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 20, 1999
A lyrical, mysterious and provocative meditation on the power of memory and narrative, "After Life" is a fascinating speculation on life and death -- until its plot takes a turn so melodramatic that the spell is broken.Kore-eda Hirokazu ("Mabarosi") has germinated a fascinating idea: What if there were a way-station between Earth and heaven, where the recently deceased could sift through their memories, choose the most happy and meaningful moment of their lives, have it made into a movie, and then move into the next life, where they will live in that moment forever?
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 23, 2004
ROCHESTER, N.Y. - Facing a sharp drop in demand for conventional photographic film, Eastman Kodak Co. said yesterday that it was speeding its transition to digital imaging while cutting costs in its film business by eliminating up to 15,000 jobs worldwide, more than a fifth of its work force. The job cuts will come over the next three years, and the company said it would take restructuring charges of up to $1.7 billion against its earnings during that period. Worldwide sales of consumer film, one-use cameras and Advanced Photo System film stock fell 11 percent in terms of dollars and 15 percent in units in the fourth quarter compared with the corresponding quarter a year earlier, the company said.
NEWS
By KEVIN SMOKLER | August 19, 1994
I magine going to the Louvre and noticing horrible changes. The Mona Lisa's smile has blurred into a muddy frown. The once brilliant colors of the Flemish masters have deteriorated to sludge.This horrifying vision is the reality of America's film history.The National Center for Film and Video Preservation (NCFVP) estimates that of the 21,000 feature films made before 1951, "only half exist today."Most of the remainder are falling victim to deterioration of their nitrate stock, the highly reactive substance base of pre-1951 film.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | April 4, 1991
The 22nd annual Baltimore International Film Festival kicks off at 7:30 tonight at the Baltimore Museum of Art with a selection of shorts gathered under the rubric "Director's Showcase."The event begins with something of a coup: Organizers chose Adam Davidson's "Lunch Date" when it was nominated for an Academy Award in the Best Short Subject/Live Action category. Whether festival director George Udel, who made the selections, is lucky or good we'll never know. But "Lunch Date" won the Oscar.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 2, 1999
"20 Dates," Myles Berkowitz's self-indulgent, self-serving and ultimately empty documentary about his love life, is the kind of personal filmmaking that gives personal filmmaking a bad name.You can trace this sort of film back to Ross McElwee, whose 1986 movie, "Sherman's March," became a sleeper hit on the art circuit. Originally planning to make a film about the Civil War, McElwee instead turned his camera on himself -- or rather, the women in his life who had dumped him -- and transformed "Sherman's March" into an unexpectedly funny and engaging meditation on intimacy.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.